Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

MARTY - enjoyed


classiccinemafan
 Share

Recommended Posts

I enjoy this one as well. Been waiting for TCM to show this again - I believe the last time it aired was during a tribute to Mr. Borgnine shortly after his passing in 2012. Did you know the TCM version of this film includes a scene that is not present on the earlier DVDs - it's the one where Clara returns home and talks to her parents about how she enjoyed her evening and her plans for the future. How they could remove this from the DVD is beyond me. Great to see the 'entire' movie again. Thanks again, TCM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Simply a wonderful uplifting movie of two very lonely people finding love after their first bloom of youth subsides and of parents having to let go. All in a massive city where finding love is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Borgnine's very best performance and the one he seemed destined for. Betsy Blair was just as terrific as the lonely schoolteacher. +A movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find the Steiger original more pathetic than anything else. I'm actually uncomfortable watching it. I think the picture producers made excellent choices that resulted in more accessible characters. Borgnine's Marty was more a victim of circumstance than being the depressing character that Steiger portrayed. The TV play may have been more realistic, but if Hecht-Hill-Lancaster wanted people to buy tickets in droves, there had to be a bit more optimism in the film.

 

My only complaint about the picture is the theme song being used for the main title. It elevated the atmosphere too far above the complacent setting of the opening of the film. Roy Webb should have been allowed to use the melody in a more adaptive manner and not in a full-out major key arrangement. The theme worked alright in the underscoring and it's fine for the curtain call. But I didn't like it as a table-setter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>I find the Steiger original more pathetic than anything else. I'm actually uncomfortable watching it.

 

I think that was the point.

 

>Borgnine's Marty was more a victim of circumstance than being the depressing character that Steiger portrayed.

 

So he's not an "ugly little man", but really a take-charge guy just waiting for the right girl to come along? I don't think that's what Chayefsky intended

 

>The TV play may have been more realistic, but if Hecht-Hill-Lancaster wanted people to buy tickets in droves, there had to be a bit more optimism in the film.

 

The movie was produced as a tax write-off, so I doubt if the producers were too worried about tickets at that stage.

 

FWIW Steiger was offered the role in the film first, but he refused to sign a longterm contract with the HHL production company. That's why they signed Borgnine (who after the Oscar did his damnedest to get out of his own HHL contract).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I missed it last night, but I'm sure it'll be back before too long.

 

My fondest memory of this movie( which I've mentioned before) was when my wife and I were watching it one evening. There was a scene where Marty's Mother and Aunt were talking about being "old and useless", over the hill and ready for mothballs and such. They were dressed in dowdy print dresses, hair done back in buns, and clunky "old lady" shoes. And then the Aunt mentions them being 58 YEARS OLD!

 

And there was my wife, dressed in running slacks, a bright yellow T-shirt, New Balance shoes on her feet and a cute "pixie" type hair-do watching all this....at the age of 64!

 

I STILL laugh thinking about it.

 

I also laugh when I think of two of my nieces, in college, and soon to be "One step-a from the STREET!"

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RichardKimble wrote:

I prefer the TV version with Rod Steiger

 

Hey, Doc, when did you see the Rod Stieger TV version being on the run and all? I'd like to for comparison.

 

I taped the movie for watching this morning and fell in love with it all over again. These folks look like real people with problems most folks were dealing with back then. The movie doesn't solve them all which makes it seen even more real. It looks like the streets of New York rather than a set and the clothes from the local store racks rather than a Hollywood costume department.

 

The story also shows the major changes that beginning to creep into American life. Young couples and families are caught between wanting to be one their own rather than live in an extended family yet feeling disloyal to family members. Clara feels women should have lives of their own outside of being wives and mothers. Raised in the Depression, Marty is unsure whether or not to go into debt and buy the butcher shop which is being threatened by the supermarkets. Older traditional women are becoming "empty nesters" with little options to fill their lives. All this is done so subtlety that you don't catch it until later which causes you to think more than being obvious.

 

All this from a movie made as a tax write-off which became so much more! It deserves everything it got.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Marty" is my second favorite movie, Chayefsky's "Middle of the Night" is my number one.

 

I am currently reading "Mad As Hell" a biography of Chayefsky as well as his screenplays and stage plays.

 

Here's the oddity: Several years ago I attended a screening of "Marty" in Hollywood, hosted by Delbert Mann, the director. When the floor was opened for questions, I asked the audience if anyone had seen the scene with Clara and her parents, No one had.

 

Delbert Mann told us that that scene was in the original movie but was cut to make room for TV commercials.

 

The SCENE WITH CLARA IS NOT IN THE SCREENPLAY. Go figure!

 

The only other deviations from the screenplay to the movie are minor. Watching Sid Caesar on Saturday night is switched to "Your Hit Parade" but the missing scene business is puzzling.

 

Edited by: johnpressman on Feb 15, 2014 8:56 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer the TV version with Rod Steiger

 

I've only seen that version once, many years ago, and at that time I would have agreed with you. Of course both Steiger and Borgnine are marvelous actors, and physically suited for the part.

 

Since then, I've seen the Borgnine version many times and can't imagine anything being better than that, but I'd love to see TCM get a hold of the Steiger version just to make the comparison. I think a lot of viewers who've never seen this "other" version would be in for a pleasant revelation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Finance, a couple of years back "The Catered Affair" was made into a Broadway musical. I saw the production pre-Broadway at the Globe Theater in San Diego. Although I enjoyed it very much, I was disappointed in that the musical version of "Marty" with John C. Reilly (he can really sing!) never made it to Broadway, only showcased in Connecticut.

 

As for the missing scene, I have no doubt that it was included in the original release of the movie, then trimmed for television, now restored for TCM and the DVD release, but why was it not in the screenplay? I just read it the other day and am puzzled. I wish Delbert Mann was alive so I could ask him again.

 

By the way, I have met Ernest Borgnine several times, my pal had to chase him up the aisle of the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood after a TCM-sponsored screening of "From Here To Eternity" in order to get his autograph on a copy of "Ernie" his autobiography. Great Guy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Delbert Mann told us that that scene was in the original movie but was cut to make room for TV commercials.

 

Are you saying that Mann showed your group a cut version of the film? Was it a 16 mm print or a 35 mm print? He could have shown you an edited TV print instead of the original theatrical version.

 

I haven't watched the full TCM version in a few years, but I'm pretty sure I remember a scene in the TCM copy with Clara talking to her parents. Didn't she say something about moving out an getting her own apartment?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I first saw this film in a theater when I was about 13 years old, and I thought it was boring.

 

But I saw the film again years later and I thought it was great. The reason being is that many millions of young men, and young women, have to face the very same problem Marty faces. If we are shy, or ugly, or goofy, or whatever, we young men don't usually get the chance to date the most beautiful girls, and the same with the girls who have to settle for us average guys, who are not handsome movie-star types. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't make sense - cutting the scene for commercial time. The picture runs 90 minutes. Until the early 80's, even local stations aired 92 minutes of film during a two-hour time slot. Networks ran 100 minutes. I don't have a B&B here so I don't know if MARTY played on a Network. Mann might have seen a local airing that ran in a 90 minute time slot, in which case it would have been cut to 72 minutes. And, believe me, that happened!

 

What I don't understand is a home video release being cut. Which release was this? MGM/UA Home Video VHS?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Watched "Marty" the other day with the screenplay at hand. This is the screenplay not the television play.

 

Some of the dialogue is different and several sentences are cut out in the movie. Several scenes are switched around, most notably the scenes at the Stardust Ballroom with Clara and her date as opposed to the scene with Marty and Angie on the stag line. Also the scene with Marty's mother and aunt are in different sequence.

 

But still, most puzzling, the scene with Clara and her parents is not in the screenplay. I do have two different versions of "Marty", both recorded from TV, one with Clara's scene and one without.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've often heard that some films were issued in slightly different versions, often because the studio heads, directors, and producers sometimes disagreed on the films lengths and what should or should not be cut out for various reasons.

 

Something like the first and later versions of Apocalypse Now. I saw the first version, with the jungle village at the end being napalmed, and THAT version is the one that I think is the only correct version. Coppola is supposed to have later had a sudden vision or insight telling him that the first ending was the wrong one, and he changed all the later prints to show the village not being bombed, which, I think, is silly, since the film clearly included dialogue about the ALMIGHTY code word command that would call in the bombing raid, which was part of the original plan of Willard's assignment, and of course the napalming of the village was filmed for that very purpose of showing it at the end of the movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't give examples, but I've experienced that before. Some movie I haven't seen since it was at the theater would "premier" on TV, and I'd notice the ending was different than I remembered it. Or sometimes several scenes seemed changed somehow.

 

Thought it was ME!

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...