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Too young for movies..


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I read an article on how movies cater to younger audience,like 16 to 34 yrs.old.(most TV shows also) I know that most of us on the board aren't AHRP members but, classic movie lovers. In the days before the rating system most/all movies were for all audiences and were broken down to "Drama,Comedy,Horror,Melodrama.And were enjoyed by all,and there wasn't an age barrier. The thing is do you think that movies now-a-days are thrown together just to satisfy younger crowds and to utilize the flavor (star) of the month.What happened to the "Adult/thought provoking movies that were in the same line as our classics today.

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This is why 99% of the movies being churned out today are crap. Once in a blue moon we get lucky (the Aviator, DeLovely...) and Cinderella Man sounds like it may be a good one. How sad that the good ones usually don't do well at the box office.

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Don't fret. Box Office sales are down more than ever in 2005.....even more than last year. The only way to get us out of this 'Seen it before' era of Movies is to keep NOT going to theaters.

 

Its beginning to shift but still will take more time.

 

People have to quit buying into the FX Age as much and we'll be ok to see more original motion pictures.

 

Personally, I'm glad to be an independent filmmaker right now. Hollywood's chunking a lot of new/original material right now.

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I saw "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" over the weekend. Dreadful. The first half hour was enjoyable and fun as Pitt and Jolie go about their domestic suburban lives unaware that each has a secret identity as a spy. Then we get 90 minutes of shoot-outs, car chases, explosions. It was an assault on the senses and felt like a 4 hour movie.

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Its the "D" word - demographics. Seems to me the industry caters to the 15-25 age group - which is precisely why I rarely attend current films.

 

Our resident movie critic on the CBS network said it very succintly:

 

"Bleed and you lead

Think and you sink".

 

 

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It is much easier to make crap movie, just churn out that same formula.

The problem is that studios today don't nurture talent any more, not the way the old studio system did. Movie making was always a business, first and foremost, but in the olden days studios cared about the quality of the product they were putting out on the market. Sometimes when I watch one of DVDs out of my vast collection, I become aware of the fact that almost everyone involved with the making of that film is long gone. Yet, the studio is still making money out of that movie, because I, amongst millions of other people have bought the DVD.

I wonder if anyone 100 years from now will hunt for that rare copy of "Mr & Mrs Smith" or "Dude where's my car?".

It is sad to see this incredible art form reduced to these levels.

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I like the quote that has been posted at Moviediva.com:

 

"Giants like these (Independence Day, Godzilla, Pearl Harbor, the 2nd and 3rd Matrix movies) continue to stalk through the multiplexes, shaking gold from the heavens with their thunderous, THX Certified footsteps; but inside their high-definition, digitized craniums their tiny brains are dead."

 

--Louis Menand on the state of the cinema blockbuster in the February 7, 2005 New Yorker.

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It's so true that the new movies are mostly for teens. I'm a teen and I think I'm so lucky to have "discovered" classic movies because the movies for us are awful. There's almost nothing good about them. They try to make their movies funny with grose jokes. Like in the movie DODGEBALL. Most of the humor is pretty nasty. The new movies also try to make teens feel older by using bad language and sex. I'm not totally against these movies, I mean there are some really good ones, just not many.

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but I think the producers direct their product at the lowest common demoninator intelligence also.

 

I should bemoan this trend, but I feel I must somewhat blame myself.

 

For a product to continue unabated, it must sell. Back in the 1920's and 1930's, though children were always a part of the mix in theatres, it is my belief that adults were more often filling the nationwide Bijous, as they would go to the movies for live vaudeville entertainment, perhaps a magician, a short, a cartoon, a B-programmer, a main movie and so on, all in one fell swoop in an evening. I have relatives who say it was common for adults to go to films and the local theatre, two and three or more times a week.

 

So since adults were filling the coffers, the films were aimed at adult audiences. This is not to say there was not the occasional balderdash which was of Grade-Z quality, but the producers must have seen the major audience as being grown ups, with kid material a bit peripheral to the main scope of production. Sure...there was always the kiddie matinee and westerns, and serials, but big movies were made for big people.

 

So, I can somewhat blame myself, that films which are for kiddies are the norm, since I stopped paying to go to films quite a long time ago, and probably have not been supportive. On the other hand, the ticket prices are sky high, and often the films do not warrant paying that much, just because some star asked for a twenty million dollar salary.

 

Again...in the olden days, the stars weren't paid that much, the films were totally affordable, it was the only game in town, with no tv as competition, so doing good business, the studios could keep making the same product aimed at adults, like Bette Davis films or so many others.

 

I don't know what to say...all I know is that even films which advertise themselves as adult ones nowadays, seem like they are made for a childish mind, and are not very sophisticated or rewarding to watch.

 

I've become a hermit, just watching all the good old films at home on dvd's, and very few of the new. Every once in a while, I do go to a film, but they are few and far between.

 

So I've no solution, but I doubt you will be seeing a film like "The Pumpkin Eater" or "The Servant" anytime soon....

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Hmmm....yes, I know what you mean. I've been going to cinema once or twice a year for the last few years. I am 29 years old and feel there is absolutely nothing out there to grab my attention. Sad really, because nothing matches watching a movie on the big screen. Occasionally I go to the BFI (British Film Institute) to watch one of the classic movies in their full glory, but it is more expensive than the ordinary cinema (?12 a ticket=25 dollars), so it is a rare treat. Worth it, though!

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One other thing- apart from the dearth of quality entertainment for the viewing public - is that when you part with your movie dollar you HOPE to be able to enjoy the film without the accompaniment of tearing candy wrappers, or worse yet, couples who just have to comment on the action on screen. Or people who can't stay seated and are to-ing and fro-ing. Some folks just don't get it.

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It must be emphasized that we are talking about modern HOLLYWOOD movies. If you are adventurous enough, there are plenty of good, even great American Independent and Foreign films being made. Of course, if you live in a smaller town, you may have to drive a bit to find an arthouse theater in a bigger city or college town. I have noticed that some of the multiplexes I've been to around the country are dedicating a screen or two to smaller, artsy films. So, other choices do exist. I am always amazed when I see a mature, intelligent French or Italian film, for example, and think to myself that this movie would NEVER be produced by a Hollywood studio.

 

So, I agree that Hollywood is in a major rut, and usually aim their product at a younger, unsophisticated audience. I admit that I see my share of movies that merely fill the void until a great film comes along. I even enjoy the occasional blockbuster. But again, there are alternatives. We all love our classic films here and can watch some over and over again, but I am still interested in the future of cinema. There are still great stories being told. Unfortunately, not many are coming from the major Hollywood studios. Having said that, I still love seeing a film in a theater. I love my VCR and DVD player, but nothing beats the big screen for me.....

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