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Gigot


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I thought the film was...interesting. Robert Osborne explained that after filming was complete, the project was taken over by Twentieth-Century-Fox and rather severely edited from the film Jackie Gleason and Gene Kelly intended for audiences to see.

 

Overall I enjoyed the film -- perhaps largely because I enjoy Jackie Gleason in anything. I also enjoyed the location shooting in Paris -- a city I must travel to again some day.

 

My big complaint is that the picture was just a bit too sentimental for my taste. A little cinematic sentimentality goes a long way in my opinion.

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It's been so long since I've seen it, I dont remember much about it. I discovered it was on about halfway through, but didnt want to watch just part of it. I hope TCM is planning another showing... I forgot to check the prime time schedule yesterday. :(

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I have tried to watch this several times, but Gleason is just too dirty looking for me to be able to watch it.

 

After watching a few minutes, I begin to itch all over and I want to go take a bath.

 

I think they should have kept him in clean old ragged clothes.

 

Charlie Chaplin always looked ragged as the Tramp, but he never looked dirty.

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I remember seeing this movie as a child, and I have a great fondness for it. I find the scene in the church especially moving. Some people can't bear its sentimentality, but I think it's a great performance by Gleason. Also, I'm of French descent, so I enjoy the Gallic humor and depiction of French village life.

 

Edited by: rosebette on Feb 18, 2014 6:19 PM

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I've only watched the first half hour of the film so far but, generally, I've liked what I've seen.

 

Robert Osborne introduced the film as the first wholly silent screen performance since Jane Wyman in Johnny Belinda. But what about Jacques Tati? Or perhaps he only meant among American actors.

 

Speaking of Tati, with the Paris on location shooting adding immensely to the film's atmosphere (I love those narrow cobblestone streets, at times), and watching the way that Gigot seems to have with stray dogs, it reminds me of the dogs seen at both the opening and closing of Mr. Hulot's Holiday.

 

Did Paris have a lot of feral dogs?

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Gleason's "Gigot" reminded me of the "Pool Soul" character he portrayed on TV but I'm glad I watched it and did enjoy the film. His dirty appearance was a bit much but then again he was a portraying a dimwitted janitor who lived in a dirty basement. The fact he composed the music for the film is evident to me although it was arranged and conducted by Michel Magne.

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> I think they should have kept him in clean old ragged clothes.

 

 

Dang, Fred! My EYES nearly rolled out of my head. C'mon, now!

 

My ex HATED this movie. Complained mostly that all it seemed to be to her was, "A guy walking around never SAYING anything!"

 

Then years later, my daughter told me she was a big fan of "Mr. Bean". Go figure...

 

I, however, always loved it. In spite of it's sugary sentimentality, I thought it was Gleason's best screen work along with REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT, which came out around the same time.

 

Sepiatone

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From the archives:

 

>Jackie Gleason was notoriously difficult to work with on the set of a motion picture. He amazed his fellow actors and co-workers on Gigot with his openness. Now during the downtime he mingled with the cast and crew, which was something he rarely ever did. He even gave in when director Gene Kelly imposed a strict exercise regimen on the star. Kelly had Gleason running up and down a flight of stairs to get him into better physical shape. But rather than refusing, Gleason responded by putting up a sign in his dressing room that stated "Gene Kelly is always right." Other directors who had worked with Gleason couldn't believe it. Some friends found a reason for Gleason?s good mood. He had a starring role in which he didn?t have to remember any lines. -- For American Movie Classics, I?m John Burke. (In front of a very empty main theater at Radio City Music Hall, c. 1999)

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