Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Warner Brothers Directors


mrroberts
 Share

Recommended Posts

Many years after her Warners days had ended, Olivia de Havilland was reunited with director Michael Curtiz for a final film in 1957, a lovely, sensitive little western called The Proud Rebel.

 

At the wrapup party for the film Errol Flynn impulsively popped into the party to say hello to Olivia. (The two hadn't seen one another in 15 years and Flynn's features had greatly changed with his years of heavy boozing and drugs). The actor snuck up behind de Havilland and kissed her on the back of the neck.

 

Olivia swung around, angrily demanding, "Do I know you?" (Some reports also say that she slapped him in the face).

 

It took the actress a few seconds before she finally recognized her former famous co-star of eight films. It must have been a terribly embarrassing moment for both of them.

 

Afterward they went out to lunch together to talk over old times. That lunch was the last time they would see one another. Olivia later made reference to the mischief that was gone from Flynn's eyes. (Many friends would comment upon the sadness they saw in the actor's eyes in his final years).

 

Around the same time as this occurence Mike Curtiz made a comment about his former swashbuckling star. I'm paraphrasing the director now, but it was words, to the effect, "That bum, he photographed good at any angle. You couldn't get a bad side on him. Now all he wants to do is kill himself."

 

It's difficult to tell exactly from the way in which Curtiz worded his statement. It may be, however, that, with his wars with Flynn 16 years removed, and, taking into account the Hungarian's broken English, he may actually having been feeling sorry for the old boy.

 

After all those years, is it possible that Curtiz had actually softened a little in his feelings about the actor?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom, I totally agree that the comedy in SYLVIA SCARLETT allowed Grant to begin to discover his screen niche. But had he been cast in CAPTAIN BLOOD, we might never have known that. Since he wasnt known for comedic performances, that lack of humor in CB would not have made a difference, since he wasnt being considered then for roles with humor. AND being in CAPTAIN BLOOD might have kept him from being cast in SS (I think that timewise the filming of these overlapped somewhat) so that part of the Grant persona might never have developed. And whether he was a success in CB or not, there might never been opportunities in the romantic comedies at which he would soon excel, since the demonstration of these latent talents would not have occurred the way it did had he not been cast in SS.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Feb 21, 2014 10:58 AM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Tom but when you say you disagree with Arturo, I?m just not seeing it. The points you make don't contradict the points Arturo made as far as I can tell.

 

The overall point Arturo is making is that IF Grant had done CB and might have changed his entire career path. The main point being that Grant might not have done Sylvia Scarlett. The possible impact to films if this had happened is endless; e.g. Hepburn's career as a comic actress may not have taken off as well.

 

While I agree that if Grant had some early successes in dramas it is very unlikely his legacy would have been as big as it was today, I don't see where anyone said otherwise.

 

As for your last point: Well did anyone envision that the stiff actor Grant had in him his Sylvia Scarlett performance when he was cast in that movie? So it is possible that Grant might of viewed being loaned out for GB has it ?make it or your history? type of role and rose to the occasion. (But we all agree not as well as Flynn did).

 

Note I love this discussion. To me it is similar to a "what if" with Bogie and Raft. If Raft wasn?t so pig-headed Bogie might just be Bogart, "the guy that didn?t do much"! The difference here is that Raft never really recovered from his bad choices. He was a much bigger star before he made these poor choices.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Opportunity knocks only so many times in ones life. If Cary Grant had played *Captain Blood* , and done well at it, his career would have followed that path for awhile. He may have built on that image and evolved into a great success at that. Then if at some future point in time he had an opportunity to do a comedic role, playing against his established type, he may or may not have been accepted by the public as a "comic" actor. What's really important is what you do with the opportunities that come your way, sometimes it takes years and going down different roads before the right opportunities are there. Just like it did for Bogart. I believe that everyone has their special talent, hopefully you can hang around long enough until that special opportunity comes your way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the compliment (I take a bow ;) ) I don't have a big library of movie related books but when I see one (used and at a bargain price) I tend to grab it. This book doesn't necessarily go into a lot of detail but it gives a nice overall history of these prominent directors who were for a period of time under contract to Warners. I can't say that someone hasn't done any similar books of this type. As for the thread, I am just happy to get a topic going that brings up some interesting discussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Opportunity knocks only so many times in ones life. If Cary Grant had played Captain Blood , and done well at it, his career would have followed that path for awhile. He may have built on that image and evolved into a great success at that.

 

I must conceed, mrroberts, that you, arturo and jamesjazzguitar all make interesting speculations about the quirks in life that can come to any actor with an unexpected opportunity, and how the rest of their career may travel down a path largely divergent from how we view them today.

 

It sure as heck happened to a bit player named Errol Flynn with Captain Blood.

 

And I can't say for certain that it wouldn't have been the same for Cary Grant if he had been cast in the same role EXCEPT that I simply fail to see real signs of potential for the 1935 Grant to be that good in the part.

 

As I stated earlier, or should have, if I didn't, Grant is wonderful (truly a marvelous performance) in Gunga Din, an adventure film allowing him full bent for his comedy talents (as well as athletic abilities). Rather than reminding me of Flynn in that film, Grant makes me think rather more of the tongue-in-cheek flavour that Burt Lancaster would later bring to his acrobatic heroics in The Crimson Pirate.

 

But Captain Blood is far more conventional material than Gunga Din (or Crimson Pirate). I have a bit of a problem envisioning Grant doing particularly well in such a straight forward leading man role, unlike Flynn who turned out to have a natural flair for it. There's nothing about Grant's work in the adventure Last Outpost (a Bengal Lancer type film), made the same year as Blood, to make anyone take notice of him.

 

Having said that, though, Flynn also succeeded in Blood because of the collaborative effort of an entire studio system behind him, in particular the direction of Michael Curtiz (bringing this thread back to your Warners directors theme).

 

Would Grant have fared as well? I doubt it very much, but he may have had some success in the role, if only because of those studio technicians in support. I have a real problem, though, seeing the role as a natural fit for the actor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great point about Michael Curtiz and the WB 'machine' and that this was a primary reason CB is one of the top 5 adventure films. So I wonder if Jack Warner and the producers (Harry Brown and Gorden Hollingshead) viewed rushes and had the vision to see that Flynn and Dehavilland could be future superstars if the movie was a major hit.

 

Would the WB machine put in the same effort when the lead actor was a loan out from another studio? Being professionals one would assume 'yes' but maybe the crew was given an extra push. Regardless the team did a kick **** job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And I agree with you Tom that in time Cary Grant was able to find his ideal , special place in the movie business, fortunate for him, and for us. And Flynn's great opportunity to get a major role that was tailor made for him dropped in his lap was probably a once in a lifetime opportunity. One can only guess how many talented actors and actresses never got those big breaks. I keep thinking about one of my favorite "obscure" actresses, Noel Francis, who I really think had a lot of potential but never got that one major part to play that could have made her a big star. If only some studio boss or prominent director would have given her that one chance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>So I wonder if Jack Warner and the producers (Harry Brown and Gorden Hollingshead) viewed rushes and had the vision to see that Flynn and Dehavilland could be future superstars if the movie was a major hit.

 

I don't think so, at least not in the case of Olivia. They saw that these two youngsters looked great together on the Captain Blood set, and they would like their box office numbers together.

 

However, neither Jack Warner nor Hal Wallis initially considered Olivia to be anything other than just another pretty young thing. She was just "the girl" in a Flynn film to them. The only reason Warner finally decided to cast her as Maid Marian (over Anita Louise) was because of her box office numbers with Flynn in their two previous films together, rather than because he thought her more suitable for the role.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Close, finance, but not quite. Tone was nominated as Best Actor for Mutiny on the Bounty, but failed to win (and rightfully so, I might add).

 

That same year, however, 1935, over at Paramount, Franchot Tone gave a marvelous performance in another adventure film, Lives of a Bengal Lancer, scheduled for broadcast on TCM on March 3.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just looked at the IMDb entry for the 1935 awards results and noticed that there were several entries that were write in ballots. Someone was pushing " Captain Blood" entries, there were write ins for Curtiz (director) and Casey Robinson (screenplay). With *Mutiny on the Bounty* having 3 actors nominated for the best actor award the voting was probably split up amongst them. Just like the 3 nominees for best supporting actor from *On The Waterfront* split their votes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's rather interesting, mrroberts, to compare those two 1935 sea faring adventures to one another, and how they can be seen as reflective, to a degree, of their studios.

 

MGM's Mutiny on the Bounty deals with the tyranny of an individual, Captain Bligh. At the end of the film he is reprimanded by members of the naval academy.

 

Warner's Captain Blood, on the other hand, deals with the injustice of a system, with a king willfully blind to potentially innocent men being either executed or sentenced to slavery.

 

Flynn, in fact, has a great line after being sentenced by a judge who gives him a rushed conviction: " What a creature must sit on the throne who lets a man like you deal out his justice." (I've always thought that might be the best line of dialogue in the entire film).

 

In that respect, this film carries on its studio's tradition of sympathizing with victims of society, be it 1930s (I Am A Fugitive from a Chain Gang, Angels with Dirty Faces) or the 1600s with Captain Blood. Robin Hood, soon afterward, would also sympathize with the disadvantaged in a not-so-merry Old England.

 

Warner Brothers, studio of the underdog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's always nice to return from a hard day of dealing with near illiterate college students and be able to climb into a good discussion.

 

TomJH, thanks for mentioning John Garfield in The Breaking Point, which is also the more faithful film version of Hemingway's To Have and Have Not than the movie by that name.

 

I haven't seen Lives of a Bengal Lancer in years, and I'm looking forward to it. I remember liking Tone in that, as well as in another Paramount picture, Five Graves to Cairo. I also like him in Three Comrades, which is an MGM picture, but I think it's just because it's a Frank Borzage picture and has a great script. He was also good in his later career Advise and Consent. Perhaps those films gave him more to do than just be the body in the tux in Joan Crawford films.

 

I'm of the disposition to want to dispense with the "what if" speculations about Flynn and Grant's careers. Without Flynn as Captain Blood, we would not have the greatest Robin Hood ever. Without Sylvia Scarlett, we would not have The Awful Truth or Holiday the following year. I'm content to enjoy what was. Both these men had remarkable gifts and left great film legacies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

rosebette, I've got a very large soft spot for Franchot Tone's performance in Lives of a Bengal Lancer as, indeed, I do for the entire film.

 

I love the needling and bantering between Tone and career soldier Gary Cooper in that film. Tone just loves to tweak Cooper's nose, including playing the off-chord (to Coop) sounds of a snake charmer's pungi (the flute used to "hypnotize" a cobra).

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTXnP63s8sjppukSast-fT

 

As a matter of fact, if it hadn't been for the 1935 box office success of Bengal Lancer Flynn's followup to Captain Blood would not have been Charge of the Light Brigade. And, in turn, those two films would eventually lead a couple of years later to Gunga Din.

 

Yes, rosebette, Breaking Point is infinitely more faithful to Hemingway's novella than the more famous Bogart version. I think the Garfield-Curtiz version has a heck of a lot of heart. It's a film I truly love.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jamesjazzguitar, I am referring back to a question you had at the beginning of this thread. Were directors ever put on suspension? Apparently Curtis Bernhardt had several run ins with Mr Warner. German born Bernhardt had come to the US in 1939 right after the war started and signed on at Warner Bros. He quickly found out that in Hollywood the producer typically had much control over the director (just ask Hitchcock), something he wasn't accustomed to. Bernhardt had several assignments that he either didn't want at all or he wasn't allowed any freedom to make changes. So Mr. Warner either suspended him for a time or lent him out to another studio. I admit I am not very familiar with many of his films but I do see that he directed the Bogart movie *Conflict* , a film I happen to think is quite good. By the way *Conflict* was done in 1943 but held for release until 1945.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again way back to the beginning of this thread; MilesArcher had asked about Busby Berkley leaving Warners. Was it because they only wanted him for musicals? The book seems to give conflicting views on this. On the one hand he wanted to move away from musicals and while still at Warners he directed the John Garfield film *They Made Me a Criminal* , which was one of his favorite assignments. But that was Berkley's last Warners film, his contract was up and Warner balked at giving him a raise. So Berkley signed up with MGM and guess what he did at his new home, mostly musicals. Sounds like the money (and maybe the prestige of working at MGM) was the deciding factor for him.

 

Edited by: mrroberts on Feb 21, 2014 8:19 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since you made reference to Curtis Bernhardt, mrroberts, one of the less well remembered Warners directors, here are a few shots of him on the sets of some of his productions for that studio that may stir the memories of some readers:

 

crawford-bernhardt-possessed.jpg

 

Directing Crawford in Possessed

 

 

bernhardt-greenstreet-smith-bogart-conflict.jpg

 

Rehearsing with Alexis Smith and Bogart in Conflict

 

 

bernhardt-sheridan-break-juke_opt.jpg

 

Tempting Ann Sheridan with his cup of coffee on the Juke Girl set

Link to comment
Share on other sites

0000000000000000aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaerroll_zpsd64c2268.jpg

 

Wonderful shot during the production of CAPTAIN BLOOD. This is the trial set in which Peter Blood will be convicted for treason and sentenced to slavery.

 

That's director Michael Curtiz giving instructions to Errol Flynn, with cinematographer Hal Mohr listening just behind Curtiz.

 

This is, in my opinion, one of Flynn's most effective scenes in the film, ending with that great line of dialogue I earlier sighted in the thread, "What a creature must sit on the throne that lets a man like you deal out his justice."

 

Flynn was learning the ropes while making this film, constantly harassed and brow beaten by the demanding Curtiz, who not only helped make him a star but pulled such a surprisingly good performance from the neophyte actor.

 

In this particular scene Flynn is wonderful because he is so nervous and on edge. I strongly suspect that that was a reflection of the intimidating atmosphere in which he was working, with few things more intimidating for the Australian than that director towering over him.

 

!data:image/jpeg;base64,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!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The often told story is that Curtiz had Flynn and Basil Rathbone do their dueling scene without using the safety tips on their swords. This was apparently done as an act of intimidation towards Flynn and helped establish the ongoing volatile relationship between the two. Some directors seemed to think it was always necessary to use such tactics to motivate their actors. I can understand that might apply in very special circumstances but not as a regular policy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...