Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

DODSWORTH


HoldenIsHere
 Share

Recommended Posts

I tuned into DODSWORTH last night more than half way into the movie.

I'm looking forward to seeing the entire movie.

 

I was especially impressed that Ruth Chatterton's character (Fran) was presented in such a complex way in this film from 1936.

Granted, she is clearly supposed to be seen negatively, but she is portrayed as a flawed human being rather than a one-dimensional character.

In the scene where Baroness von Obersdorf (Kurt's mother) insults her, I enjoyed seeing her get her "just deserts" but also felt sorry for her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dodsworth is really a great movie. The main characters are more than one-dimensional characters. Well Dodsworth is somewhat one-dimensional at the start but this was a reflection of who he was. One can understand why Fran would get bored with a husband that was only interested in his business. But we see that if given a chance Dodsworth was willing to change and allow himself to smell the roses (just so happens that rose is Mary Astor!).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>A rather thankless role, but she runs with it.

 

I think you're right in the sense that she plays an unlikeable character, but OTOH it's a role that many an actress would go for, she is the most interesting character in the story and she has so much to do. Very challenging role. Chatterton makes this so her own, she is so good at being strong women. There varying amounts of sympathy Fran Dodsworth garners with viewers, but the fact she can get any at all is a credit to her performance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>One can understand why Fran would get bored with a husband that was only interested in his business. But we see that if given a chance Dodsworth was willing to change and allow himself to smell the roses (just so happens that rose is Mary Astor!).

 

I think this film was about something that was never spoken or mentioned...... sex-boredom between two people who have been married for many years.

 

Bored Dodsworth got his younger girlfriend at the end, but unfortunately his bored wife did not get her younger boyfriend. Yet, in this film, the wife is blamed for everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I stated before Dodsworth did NOT get a younger women (or at least a much younger women). In the Fran birthday scene, the two women discuss their ages. Fran lies and says she is 35 years old. Astor's character makes it clear she is a few years older than that. While we don't know their ages I assume that they have very similar ages, with the Astor character not being more than 5 years younger than Fran.

 

(their characters NOT the actual actresses).

 

With regards to sex; Why assume Fran didn't have sex with her younger boyfriend. While he couldn't marry her because he was a mommy's boy, that didn't mean he couldn't have sex with her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this film was about something that was never spoken or mentioned...... sex-boredom between two people who have been married for many years.

 

 

Yes, I think the film delicately suggests that or tries to (with the code in force)......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, if Fran was out all night, she might not necessarily spend the whole time dancing. With the code, they couldnt be too suggestive of that.

 

I always assumed Ruth and Mary's characters were around the same age. Mary's remark to Fran in that scene lets her know she's on to her lie and she knows she's not 35........letting her know that she felt she'd look like her at her age (meaning they were the same age or close....)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Mary Astor was 30 years old when she made the film, while Ruth Chatterton was 44, and they both looked their true ages. Walter Huston was 53.

 

FredC,

 

But Mary Astor's character, Edith, was closer to Fran's age than Mary actually was at the time she played the role.

 

As others have pointed out, in her scene with Fran, Edith makes it clear that Fran is not much older than Edith, the character- not Mary Astor the actress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>FredC,

>

>But Mary Astor's character, Edith, was closer to Fran's age than Mary actually was at the time she played the role.

 

I've got eyes. I can see.

 

Dodsworth's chubby older wife winds up with no younger man, while Dodsworth winds up with a younger thin woman.

 

End of story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Dodsworth's chubby older wife winds up with no younger man, while Dodsworth winds up with a younger thin woman.

 

Younger by five years at the most and Fran was hardly what one would call chubby or unattractive.

 

The story is much deeper than you are giving it credit for.

 

Dodsworth was attracted to Edith, not because of her figure or her age, but because she found him interesting, wasn't interested in keeping up with the Joneses (so to speak) and didn't care to dine each evening with the social classes.

 

Chances are, all the things Fran once had been interested in before they got wealthy and Fran felt the need to secure their place in social circles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>You're a hoot Fred.

 

Just look at them, James. Mary Astor is much younger than Ruth Chatterton, plus Chatterton is either fat or has padding under her dresses to make her have no youthful figure. Mary has a younthful figure and is only 30 years old and looks only 30 years old.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:) Surely you noticed the padding around her stomach and rear end and hips. Typical of the character she was playing. She wasn't ugly, she was just 44 years old and looked it. While Mary was 30 and looked it.

 

It took a while for old Doddsworth to begin to notice Mary's figure and good looks, but in the end, that's what he went back to. :)

 

 

*Baroness Von Obersdorf: [to Fran] "Have you thought how little happiness there can be for the... old wife... of a young husband?"*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that Astor the ACTRESS is younger and better looking than Chatterton the ACTRESS. But note that Dodsworth the fictional CHARACTER doesn't end up with either ACTRESS.

 

Fred, Dodsworth is a MOVIE. The characters are NOT real people. They are characters being played by ACTORS.

 

The Dodsworth CHARACTER dumps his CHARACTER wife and end up with a CHARACTER girlfriend that is only a few years younger than this wife (again, based on the scene where age of said CHARACTERS is discussed).

 

Therefore if you really feel Astor looks a lot younger than Chatterton then you believe Astor was miscast. i.e. Astor was too young to play the part and the producer should of picked an actress more suited for the part (one that looked closer in age to Chatterton).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Have you thought how little happiness there can be for the... old wife... of a young husband?

 

1caulfields.png

Juliet Mills & Maxwell Caulfield: 18 year age difference, married for 34 years and counting

 

imgres1.jpg

Mary Tyler Moore & Dr. Robert Levine: 18 year age difference, married for 31 years and counting

 

imgres2.jpg

Zsa Zsa Gabor & Prince Frederic von Anhalt: 27 year age difference, married for 28 years and counting

 

imgres.jpg

Joan Collins & Percy Gibson: 32 year age difference, married for 12 years and counting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>I agree that Astor the ACTRESS is younger and better looking than Chatterton the ACTRESS. But note that Dodsworth the fictional CHARACTER doesn't end up with either ACTRESS.

 

Yes he does. He winds up with Mary Astor, the actress playing Edith.

 

Mary was much younger and better looking than Ruth, and that's why they cast them like that. That's what they do when casting actors and actresses for movie. Edith was much younger and better looking than Fran.

 

See: Casting 101, UCLA Film School

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fred, you're so confused. Dodsworth doesn't end up with the actual actress Mary Astor. Dodsworth ends up with Edith, the character Astor played in the film. Mary Astor was divorced while making this movie because she had affairs. She didn't need Dodsworth as a lover!

 

Anyhow, you're flat out wrong about their age difference based on what we learn from the birthday scene. Everyone has told you so, but continue to march on!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eh semantics. Relax youse guys.

 

What I like about this picture is: in general, if you were to hear of an older guy leaving his wife for another woman, you'd most likely conjure up an image of some guy going through a mid-life crisis, trolling in bars and picking up some chickie in his Stingray.

 

DODSWORTH tells a completely different slant, a very possible one. Almost reminds me of Paul Henreid's loyal "Jerry" in Now Voyager with the mentally "unwell" wife.

 

We really admire Dodsworth for his loyalty. We feel badly for Mrs Dodsworth because she's so clueless. We admire Mary Astor's charactor because of her grace and restraint.

 

If the film was made today, it would be resolved by a free-for-all ****. I like the class and dignity of this movie. (even Mrs Dodsworth-she's just weak)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL. I dont think its so much padding as dressing a bit too young for her age in some clinging gowns, which was probably the intent of the designer/director. Chatterton does look older, but not THAT much older. She still looks good..........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...