Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

National anthems in movies


skimpole
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been recently rewatching La commune (Paris 1871) and as one might expect, "La Marsellaise" plays a prominent role as an anthem. This leads me to ask about other uses of national anthems in movies, aside from the obvious example of Casablanca. The United States has several national anthems, one official and several other ones. One thinks of "God Bless America" being sung as the end of The Deer Hunter. And there are several movies that use "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" but none of them come to mind just this minute.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice link, thank you Mr Dobbs. (I didn't know you could sing in French :D ) Seriously, I wonder why the man grasped the flag the way he did. You can't even make out what it is. He should have placed it at his side so it could wave freely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes he does look like me when I was younger, fighting in the War between France and Liechtenstein. He is holding the flagpole tight because the Liechtensteiners would often sneak up and steal our flags. They made ladies dresses out of them.

 

You know this method of film synchronization was very good and it is too bad more music wasn't filmed like this. I think they recorded the music first, then the singer lip synched as he was listening to the music and being filmed, while the music was being played back. Today, such film and recordings can be easily synchronized with very simple equipment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is something that's funny, the fake Kazakhstan anthem in the film "Borat - Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" (2006) that was accidently played during a real sporting event. Wonder if there is a price on Sacha Cohen's head?

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/borat-fake-kazakhstan-national-anthem-303939

 

 

The *fake* National Anthem of Kazakhstan. ****

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pv5jLsLoYcE

 

Borat_ver2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>In The Smallest Show on Earth, the audience rushes out as the movie ends so they won't have to stand while "God Save the Queen" is played. They are called "anthem sprinters."

 

Just a few days ago something occurred to me. There seem to be very few films from the studio era in which we hear "The Star Spangled Banner".

 

I can think of two, curiously both comedies: The Music Box and No Time For Sergeants. In both cases, the characters in the film that are listening (civilian in the first example, military in the second) stand at attention.

 

Robert "Believe It Or Not!" Ripley made a BION short for Warners in the early '30s, in which we hear a quartet singing "To Anacreon in Heaven", an English drinking song whose tune Frances Scott Key appropriated for the SBB. This film was produced after the greatest triumph of Ripley's career, when he published a BION column claiming the US did not have an official national anthem. This caused a public furor (and avalanche of publicity for Ripley), leading to a Congressional act making the SBB America's official national anthem. The Music Box was released about a year later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>"The Star Spangled Banner" can be heard in a lot of movies.

 

Well, okay. Name some.

 

I just remembered that it's played in Tora Tora Tora by the Navy band as the planes attack, but that's outside my studio era time frame. And of course it's in Woodstock from the same year.

 

FWIW as late as 1971, the pilot for Happy Days showed Richie and his dad standing hand over heart as the TV station signs off. But song they're listening to is "God Bless America".

 

Clearly, there was some hesitancy in the old days about using the SBB onscreen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> Clearly, there was some hesitancy in the old days about using the SBB onscreen.

 

 

Like in the old pre-"product placement" days, where props were made up with unknown brand names, or cameras( "Rear Window" is an example) had their maker's names taped over. I STILL see instances of guitars with the maker's name on the headstock taped over. And was it out of some sort of respect, or against the law to film actual currency? Notice in all studio era movies clear into the '50's used that hokey looking paper money.

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>And was it out of some sort of respect, or against the law to film actual currency? Notice in all studio era movies clear into the '50's used that hokey looking paper money.

 

It was actually against US law. I know of one exception this -- Anthony Mann's T-Men, where it is mentioned at the beginning that they have government approval to photograph the bills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't forget:

 

The Soviet anthem as sung by submariners in THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER (the only reason I know their national anthem).

 

The Nazi version of the German national anthem is heard most memorably (to me) in THE PRODUCERS (followed, of course, by "I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy" so no one suspects anything).

 

And remember Snoopy's patriotic version of the Star Spangled Banner in A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN?

]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLASfUl_mAE]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...