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RMeingast

Boycotting Woody Allen Films??

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OH yeah! My best buddy back in L.A. and I would(and still over the phone) will occasionally do a version of that. I'll ask him somethin' like, "Jew eat yet?" and he'll reply, No(or yes) I HAVE, you damn anti-Semite you!" LOL

 

(...yeah, yeah, I know...what a shock my best buddy would be one to appreciate a pun too, huh!) ;)

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Well, thanks again for the free lessons, lavender b.

 

I was starting to feel emoticonally upset. ;)

 

Jew know what I mean? :)

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Glad to help. This was a pay it forward sort of thing, a few years back someone was kind enough to help me with the emoticons :) since I felt left out I certainly knew how you felt. Back to Woody :)

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Well we agree on Harlow looks. She was OK, but stars like Young are more attractive to me also. Don?t get me wrong I?m a Harlow fan. She is funny and I love her spunk. I just get a wrong side of the tracks type of vibe from her (in a not so good way), in many of her films.

 

Maybe Bimbo isn't the right term for her but she was the first blonde bombshell and I don't see much of a difference between the two terms. Harlow, Monroe and Manfield are often lumped together but I can see how that is unfair to Harlow. She had more talent and a better movie legacy than those two combined.

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>Anyone care to tell me what magical keyboard powers everyone seems to be conjuring in order to create those emoticons?

 

I like gif emoticons-ones that move. I have several "libraries" of sites I visit....this one is pretty full (warning-can be raunchy!) Just pick a category at the top:

http://home.no/femma/smilies/

 

An innteresting wink:Nudge%20Nudge.gif

 

For when I say something stupid: icon_redface.gif

 

A response for "who likes XXX" hiya.gif

 

Pretty articulate: hengt.gifwhipping.gifvb_wtf.gif

 

>too much colon talk

moon.gif

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I like gif emoticons-ones that move. I have several "libraries" of sites I visit....this one is pretty full (warning-can be raunchy!) Just pick a category at the top:

 

http://home.no/femma/smilies/

 

So let's see if this thing works.

 

http://home.no/femma/smilies/803.gif

 

Nope, doesn't look like it. How do you actually move those images onto here? Is there a secret code you have to know?

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You're saying that Harlow left Monroe in the dust. I don't agree. I give her a slight edge.

 

I'm with James. Monroe's comic persona was pretty much limited to "clueless", while Harlow exhibited an wide range of comic talent that encompassed a multitude of moods and speech rhythms. Underneath the Bimbo surface, Harlow was almost always in full control of her situation, and when she got stymied in her wishes and ambitions the resulting outbursts were masterpieces of comic performance.

 

Think of her rants about "NOOOSEpapers" in Libeled Lady, or the way she reacted to news of William Powell's marriage to Myrna Loy by saying *"That's arson!"* with a totally deadpan face of outrage. There were a hundred Harlow moments like that in her short career that Monroe couldn't begin to match.

 

In fairness, Monroe might have developed into a passably good dramatic actress if she'd been given more roles like the ones she had in Don't Bother to Knock and Niagara. But we'll never know. Part of the problem is that in the 50's all the great comic writing was on TV. No 50's movie comedies were remotely on the same level as Your Show of Shows, or even I Love Lucy, because the center of comic gravity had migrated to the small box.

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> ..How do you actually move those images onto here? Is there a secret code you have to know?

 

Hi Andy,

 

Here's the way I do it: It's the same as posting a pic.

 

Using Internet Explorer (I'm using IE11), right-click the emoticon image and select COPY. Go to your picture hosting site (I use TinyPic), select URL as your File Type and PASTE into the File window.. hit Enter and go from there. This will come back to you as a picture which you then copy it's new URL and post here as a pic.

 

Now you say.. "I have no idea how to post a pic." (just kidding ;) ) If you need help with posting pics here one of us will be glad to help :)

 

Google Chrome is just as easy but the wording is slightly different.

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Okay, I'll try it with Firefox, which is what I use most of the time:

 

Big%20Thumb%20Up.gif

 

On Firefox, I just right clicked on the emoticon and copied the image location, and then pasted it here with the two ! ! bracketing the URL. Thanks for the elaboration.

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Harlow's greatest work as a comedienne was, arguably, as the vulgar gold digging wife of Wally Beery in Dinner at Eight, just craving to get into high society.

 

The pre-code period has her best work (Red Dust, Bombshell, not to mention that wild sexy dance of her's in Beast of the City), but after the code was enforced MGM started trying to turn her into more family fare, all to her detriment as a performer.

 

Hold Your Man, while still made during the code, after a great raunchy start, then decides to strip all the sex appeal away from both Harlow and Gable in the second half. It's almost symbolic of how Harlow's later efforts (excluding Libeled Lady) are less interesting to me.

 

Monroe's best comedy work was probably in her two Wilder comedies, Seven Year Itch and Some Like It Hot. Monroe also showed fine signs of being an effective dramatic performer in Bus Stop and The Misfits, while Harlow was modestly effective in Wife Versus Secretary (her potential for drama is there though the final effort in that film is a bit too muted, I feel).

 

Monroe exudes far greater warmth than Harlow, who often comes across on screen as quite hard boiled (though, at times, with a touch of vulnerability, to be sure, but not nearly as much as MM).

 

No matter how you slice it, Monroe's screen immortality is assured while Harlow is remembered primarily by fans of the Golden Era.

 

MM remains, I strongly suspect, the most famous actress in screen history. (Thus, I suspect, one of the key reasons why some like to knock her talents and dismiss her as a bimbo).

 

It would have been fun to have watched Woody Allen try to play off either actress, though I feel he would have probably been eaten alive by a tough Harlow.

 

(Sorry, I felt compelled to bring Woody back into the discussion again). :)

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Harlow's greatest work as a comedienne was, arguably, as the vulgar gold digging wife of Wally Beery in Dinner at Eight, just craving to get into high society.

 

The pre-code period has her best work (Red Dust, Bombshell, not to mention that wild sexy dance of her's in Beast of the City), but after the code was enforced MGM started trying to turn her into more family fare, all to her detrimentment as a performer. Hold Your Man, while still made during the code, after a great raunchy start, then decides to strip all the sex appeal away from both Harlow and Gable in the second half. It's almost symbolic of how Harlow's later efforts (excluding Libeled Lady) are less interesting to me.

 

Monroe's best comedy work was probably in her two Wilder comedies, Seven Year Itch and Some Like It Hot. Monroe also showed fine signs of being an effective dramatic performer in Bus Stop and The Misfits, while Harlow was modestly effective in Wife Versus Secretary (her potential for drama is there though the final effort in that film is a bit too muted, I feel).

 

That's a good distinction, and it kind of parallels the point I made about Marilyn's lack of comedy credentials. It's not that the potential wasn't there, but the writing talent had migrated to the small screen. I agree that other than Libeled Lady, Harlow's best work came before Joe Breen's Goon Squad stepped in to force the sublimation of every hint of sexual expression.

 

Monroe exudes far greater warmth than Harlow, who often comes across on screen as quite hard boiled (though, at times, with a touch of vulnerability, to be sure, but not nearly as much as MM).

 

That's a matter of taste. There are more than a few times when Harlow shows considerable warmth, particularly in the movies she made with Gable.

 

No matter how you slice it, Monroe's screen immortality is assured while Harlow is remembered primarily by fans of the Golden Era.

 

No question about that, but then that's like saying that JFK is better remembered by people today than Franklin D. Roosevelt. It's true, but it doesn't say much of any substance.

 

MM remains, I strongly suspect, the most famous actress in screen history. (Thus, I suspect, one of the key reasons why some like to knock her talents and dismiss her as a bimbo).

 

That may be true in some cases, but I just don't find her movies all that great. Other than The Asphalt Jungle and Don't Bother to Knock, I can't think of any other movie of hers I'd want to see again. But that's got nothing to do with surrogated "jealousy", and everything to do with my particular taste in comedy. Taste is individual.

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With all this talk about whether or not Keaton was a "step up" from Farrow or vice-versa in concerns of Woody Allen, where do you suppose LOUISE LASSER fits into all this?

 

ON MONROE vs HARLOW: It's apples and oranges to me. Each of their "screen personas" come from different eras. Monroe was relegated to more "bimbo" type roles by studio suits who figured that was where her largest appeal to the general pulbic lied. Even after NIAGRA, they failed to see any other potential for her. At least they gave Harlow more of a chance in this regard. Oh, to clear up one conception---I didn't see Harlow's character in HELL'S ANGELS as "bimbo-ish". Her character was more self serving and callous. In movies, bimbos usually get taken advantage of. Harlow in "Angels" was the one who took advantage.

 

Sepiatone

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WELL! (said with a fain expression of contempt and outrage...kinda like Franklin Pangborn would do it)

 

I'm CERTAINLY glad we're now done with all this talk of "emoticons" and "Harlow vs Monroe" and are NOW back ON-TOPIC and discussing Woody Allen again in this thread!!!

 

(...'cause I had NO idea on how to bring this thing back on-topic myself!!!)

 

LOL

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Note that when I made this Harlow Monroe comparison I mentioned talent and film legacy; Ok, trying to compare talent is often folly, while film legacy is more tangible.

 

So when I said Harlow had a greater film legacy, I meant that Harlow was in more films than Monroe that I find interesting and enjoy more.

 

One simple reason is that we are comparing 30's comedies with 50's comedies as it relates to their film legacy; to me the 30's was the best era for comedies so that gives Harlow a big boost (never considered the 'small box' theory related to the 50's but it makes sense).

 

Another factor is Harlow co-stars; ?m just a much bigger fan of the MGM actors Harlow stared with from her era than the ones Monroe did.

 

But if one counts All About Eve and The Asphalt Jungle as Monroe movies than that gives a major boost to Monroe. So rethinking my position on movie legacy I?d still place Harlow's movie legacy above Monroe's but it is closer than I first implied.

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Your analysis doesn't explain how the '50s film comedy SOME LIKE IT HOT, which happens to co-star Monroe (though she WAS clueless) is ranked by AFI the greatest comedy ever. Thank God Billy Wilder wasn't working on TV.....Was Monroe clueless in ALL her later films? How about BUS STOP or THE MISFITS?

 

Edited by: finance on Mar 29, 2014 11:49 AM

 

Edited by: finance on Mar 29, 2014 11:50 AM

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Your analysis doesn't explain how the '50s film comedy SOME LIKE IT HOT, which happens to co-star Monroe (though she WAS clueless) is ranked by AFI the greatest comedy ever. Thank God Billy Wilder wasn't working on TV.....Was Monroe clueless in ALL her later films? How about BUS STOP or THE MISFITS?

 

It's not hard to explain unless you think that everyone has some obligation to agree with the AFI's choices. I like Some Like It Hot, but I wouldn't put it in my top 25 comedies.

 

And I've said she was clueless in her comedies, not in every single movie she was in. I only wish she'd had more dramatic roles as in Don't Bother to Knock and Niagara. A few more films like that and I'd revise my opinion of her upwards, but in general her whole screen persona just leaves me cold. I'm not the only one who feels this way, but even if I were, what of it?

 

Bottom line: It's opinion based on subjective criteria. I can "explain" why I don't particularly care for Monroe, but only by my own standards, not by the standards of Norman Mailer or Gloria Steinem or Hugh Hefner or the esteemed critics who mark AFI ballots.

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Whether the AFI ranks Some Like It Hot highly or not, that Billy Wilder production ranks as my all time favourite comedy. It's a brilliant production in so many ways.

 

While some might argue that the film belongs to Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis, Marilyn Monroe makes an invaluable contribution to its success, as well. This was her greatest film, without doubt. (To think that I believe I've heard talk of Mitzi Gaynor being originally considered for the role).

 

By the way, this thread has really wandered off course. Perhaps I started it by mentioning Diane Keaton's performance in Annie Hall, which lead to a discussion contrasting her to screen "bimbos." Somehow Monroe and Harlow got mixed up in it.

 

For those who still want to discuss Woody Allen on a thread that is supposed to be about him, I hope you will still feel free to chime in.

 

How about this, since we just had a discussion that included Some Like It Hot. A remake of that film, with Woody Allen and Mel Brooks in drag.

 

What, not so good?

 

Okay, how about a remake a couple of decades ago with a YOUNG Woody and Mel in drag, with Madeline Kahn in the Monroe part? Now you like it, don't you? ;)

 

 

 

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!

 

Okay,okay, maybe Mel doesn't care for the suggestion.

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LOL

 

Perfectly used pic of Mel there, Tom.

 

However, maybe the reason Mel looks so aghast at your suggestion there is because the original SLIH, while being played for broad laughs(okay, pun intended here) and lot of "inside" Hollywood humor, it never overtly "winks at the audience" like many if not most of Woody's and Mel's movies do.

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I went back and read the original post and I feel this thread was never really about Woody Allen, but instead about the act of boycotting artists because one has 'issues' with their character. Allen was used because he is the current poster boy. Someone like Polanski could of played the same role if the article was written anytime his case because relevant in the news (e.g. the L.A. DA's attempt to bring him to trail during an election year).

 

I'm still very surprised at the low bar some people have with regards to boycotting someone; e.g. an actor makes comments about another actor, like the ones Emma Thompson made about Audrey Hepburn and My Fair Lady.

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>However, maybe the reason Mel looks so aghast at your suggestion there is because the original SLIH, while being played for broad laughs(okay, pun intended here) and lot of "inside" Hollywood humor, it never overtly "winks at the audience" like many if not most of Woody's and Mel's movies do.

 

Exactly, Dargo! That's why the Woody-Mel remake of Some Like It Hot would be a fresh take, inasmuch as it would have plenty of ;) .

 

I'm sorry, but the whole idea of Woody lying in a train berth, while trying to hold onto his falsies, at the same time oogling a campy Madeline Kahn, is too much for me to NOT wish that it had happened. (How I miss that very funny lady).

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Who would play the Tony Curtis part? Curtis was a very good looking man. To me that part calls for a good looking man. A man good looking enough to land a gal like Monroe, if he wasn't in disguise.

 

Woody or Mel don't cut it in this regard.

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James, the only thing that I can say now is that I would definitely NOT boycott Woody and Mel appearing in a new version of Some Like It Hot. ;)

 

Only they would probably have to update it a bit to bring in younger audiences - How about SOME LIKE IT ****?

 

Come on, guys, let's start a petition or somethin'. Lets' start writing letters to Woody and Mel (they're both writers, right? They'll come up with a great script). We can make it happen, and the birth of it will be on this thread!

 

Woody in a bra, Mel with a high falsie, err, make that falsetto. I can't wait!

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