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Boycotting Woody Allen Films??


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And was labeled as such by James Monaco in his book American Film Now, published only 5 years after Sleeper's release. It sort of equivalent (for Americans) to all those Monty Python references to English politicians and TV stars (they must've really hated one Reginald Maudling; he gets mentioned at least half a dozen times on the TV show, sometimes in totally non-sequitur situations).

 

IMHO the Shanker **** is far from the best moment in Sleeper, which holds up pretty well aside from the topical jokes and Diane Keaton's usual annoying presence.

 

Or like all those figures in The Divine Comedy  who were very significant

to Dante, but who modern readers don't have a clue about, thus annotation.

The Shanker line is funny in itself, even if it doesn't play a big role in the movie. I

haven't seen it in a while, so I don't want to comment on it too much.

 

I happened to see Richard  Kimble tonight. Through a series of not very believable

circumstances, he wound up on the same bus as Lt. Gerard's wife.

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I happened to see Richard  Kimble tonight. Through a series of not very believable

circumstances, he wound up on the same bus as Lt. Gerard's wife.

 

Well if you're going to nitpick...

 

The Fugitive is like grand opera or kabuki theatre -- you must accept its conventions in order to enjoy it:

 

-- Wherever he goes, Kimble will have no problem finding a job or a place to stay.

 

-- Even though he is a convicted murderer, the people Kimble meets will believe and trust him. The women will generally fall in love with him.

 

-- And of course he will always make a last-second escape just before the final commercial.

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Well if you're going to nitpick...

 

The Fugitive is like grand opera or kabuki theatre -- you must accept its conventions in order to enjoy it:

 

-- Wherever he goes, Kimble will have no problem finding a job or a place to stay.

 

-- Even though he is a convicted murderer, the people Kimble meets will believe and trust him. The women will generally fall in love with him.

 

-- And of course he will always make a last-second escape just before the final commercial.

 

I think any true blue couch potato is long used to the way TV shows play out

in terms of realismand, in general, doesn't have a problem with this fact, though

every once in a while there is something that sets off the absurdity detector. I

don't believe The Fugitive is anything out of the ordinary in this regard. I accept

Kimble's great good luck, even while realizing it's almost supernatural. He does

seem to attract the ladies and, often along with them, a jealous guy who's eager

to upset things.

 

I was watching the other day and noticed, through the ability to freeze the frame,

that an article that had been in a different newspaper a number of episodes ago

was the same as the one in the present episode. And Kimble must go through

more small suitcases and those plastic tote bags than a Samsonite salesman.

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Well if you're going to nitpick...

 

The Fugitive is like grand opera or kabuki theatre -- you must accept its conventions in order to enjoy it:

 

-- Wherever he goes, Kimble will have no problem finding a job or a place to stay.

 

-- Even though he is a convicted murderer, the people Kimble meets will believe and trust him. The women will generally fall in love with him.

 

-- And of course he will always make a last-second escape just before the final commercial.

 

I think any true blue couch potato is long used to the way TV shows play out

in terms of realismand, in general, doesn't have a problem with this fact, though

every once in a while there is something that sets off the absurdity detector. I

don't believe The Fugitive is anything out of the ordinary in this regard. I accept

Kimble's great good luck, even while realizing it's almost supernatural. He does

seem to attract the ladies and, often along with them, a jealous guy who's eager

to upset things.

 

I was watching the other day and noticed, through the ability to freeze the frame,

that an article that had been in a different newspaper a number of episodes ago

was the same as the one in the present episode. And Kimble must go through

more small suitcases and those plastic tote bags than a Samsonite salesman.

 

Remember, the job market was a lot better back in the '60s. To get a job, you only had to be "willing to work", unless you were looking to be, e.g., president of General Motors.

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Remember, the job market was a lot better back in the '60s. To get a job, you only had to be "willing to work", unless you were looking to be, e.g., president of General Motors.

 

That was part of the unspoken background of the period. He has no trouble

finding menial jobs wherever he happens to go. Just taking a wild guess, I'd say

his two most frequent job categories are transportation--trucking or chauffeuring and agri-

culture. Things might be a lot tougher today.

 

I really miss SpellCheck. It worked on the old system, but not on this one.

Bumner mann.

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I think this thread may have had its time in the sun, and all good things must come to an end.

 

However, before I let this thread "pass away" (an expression I normally hate, by the way, but I suppose we can use it when referring to a thread, because that's literally what most threads do after a while), I'd like to say a little about Woody Allen's most popular film, Hannah and Her Sisters.

 

There's a reason why this movie is so popular. It's what I call a "life-affirming" film.A lot of people complain that Woody's always whining and worrying about the inevitability of death, that he's neurotic and "negative".

But in some ways he's an extremely "positive" filmmaker. And there's no better example of that than Hannah and Her Sisters.

One of my favourite scenes, not only from the film, but one of my favourite scenes of all time, is the one where Woody(Mickey) is telling Holly (Dianne Wiest) about his desperate quest to find meaning in life. He tries on all kinds of different religions and philosophies, but finally decides not knowing for sure what, if anything, happens after death is "not good enough".

In a world that cannot give him concrete answers to why he is there, he decides to shoot himself, "end it all". But in typical Woody Allen fashion, he bumbles it. His finger on the gun trigger slips, the gun slides away from his head and goes off in the air, and Mickey, overwhelmed with confusion and bewilderment, rushes out of his apartment.

He walks and walks, with no particular destination and a jumbled rush of thoughts in his head.

Finally, he finds himself standing in front of an old movie rep cinema he likes and frequents. He walks in, not thinking much about what he's doing, and finds an old movie he knows and loves playing up on the screen.

So he settles down and watches the movie. 

He starts to enjoy it. And he realizes that life is sweet. Life can be sweet, even if it's the odd moment watching a funny film that makes you laugh and feel good.

He starts thinking about how many reasons there are to enjoy life, to want to keep on living, even if there is no guarantee of anything beyond that life, the one we're in right now, here on earth. 

This is one of the simplest and yet most profound arguments I've ever heard in favour of choosing life over death. Every time I hear MIckey tell this story, I am deeply moved.

 

And isn't it kind of gratifying for us movie-lovers to see that it was a movie that helped him come to that realization? (Although it could have been anything - music, flowers, the sound of the sea, anything that makes you glad to be alive. Sorry about the cliche.)

 

(By the way, I've always wanted Holly to ask MIckey what the movie was. She doesn't, and it wouldn't have really fit in with the script at that point. But it's Duck Soup.)

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Or Hal Roach's films, Andy. I find it amusing that this thread is in danger of 'passing away', but has been bumped up.

 

And no, of course Woody Allen's films should not be boycotted simply because he was a perv. Hitch was a perv too, and who would boycott his films?

 

Exactly.   :D

 

 

I read The Ethicist every week, and what he didn't really address is the strong possibility that there might be a better case for boycotting Mia Farrow's films.

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 I find it amusing that this thread is in danger of 'passing away', but has been bumped up.

 

I don't know why it's amusing.

I went out of my way to say that it looked to me as though the thread was "passing away", and that that was ok, all good things must come to an end, etc.

 

Then I said there was something I wanted to say about Woody Allen's films, and that one film in particular, Hannah and Her Sisters, before it did (pass away - the thread, I mean.)

 

So of course I bumped it up. I'd been meaning to say that about HAHS for some time on this thread, and I wanted to say it before the thread faded into obscurity.

 

Ain't nothin wrong with that, is there?

 

hannah_and_her_sisters_diane_wiest.jpg

 

"Well, I know exactly what Edith's talking about."

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Edith, you struck the nail!

 

I don't know if Hannah and Her Sisters is my favorite Woody Allen film, but it's certainly up there.  There are several profound moments, big and small, in that film.  Besides the scenarios you mentioned, there's a small one in the midst of it when Mickey tries to explain his obsession with trying different religions and finding "the meaning of it all." to his puzzled Father.  Mickey asks something like,"Don't you want to know what the truth of it all is?", and his Father replies, "I don't know how the toaster works!".  As if to say that he appreciates that it does work, and it's good enough for him.  Which basically is what Mickey eventually learns in the theater.

 

Sepiatone

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Sepia, I've seen the film many times, I've heard that line about the toaster many times, and every single time I hear it , I laugh. Sometimes I think it's the best response of all to people angsting about the meaning of life.

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Edith, you struck the nail!

 

I don't know if Hannah and Her Sisters is my favorite Woody Allen film, but it's certainly up there.  There are several profound moments, big and small, in that film.  Besides the scenarios you mentioned, there's a small one in the midst of it when Mickey tries to explain his obsession with trying different religions and finding "the meaning of it all." to his puzzled Father.  Mickey asks something like,"Don't you want to know what the truth of it all is?", and his Father replies, "I don't know how the toaster works!".  As if to say that he appreciates that it does work, and it's good enough for him.  Which basically is what Mickey eventually learns in the theater.

 

Sepiatone

For latter-day Woody Allen films, I have a slight preference for CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS

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How did you determine Hannah and Her Sisters is Allen's most popular film?  DVD rentals?  

 

james and finance, this is so typical of you guys.I write paragraphs about Hannah and Her Sisters , trying to make a point about the film that I feel very strongly about, and all you two have to say is "Do you really think Hannah and Her Sisters is Woody Allen's most popular film?"

 

Missing the point.

I should have written, " one of his most popular films". Then you'd have to talk about what I actually said in the post, instead of seizing upon that one detail.

The post wasn't about whether HAHS was Woody Allen's first, second, or tenth most popular film. No, I did not look up its DVD rentals. Stuff like that is boring to me.

Hannah and Her Sisters is, I assume you would both agree, ONE OF Woody Allen's more well-known and popular films. 

 

My post was about a scene in the film, and a theme that often escapes Allen's detractors. The film's specific degree of popularity was irrelevant. I regret the error. I should not have mentioned anything about popularity, it was clearly a great distraction for you two.

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james and finance, this is so typical of you guys.I write paragraphs about Hannah and Her Sisters , trying to make a point about the film that I feel very strongly about, and all you two have to say is "Do you really think Hannah and Her Sisters is Woody Allen's most popular film?"

 

Missing the point.

I should have written, " one of his most popular films". Then you'd have to talk about what I actually said in the post, instead of seizing upon that one detail.

The post wasn't about whether HAHS was Woody Allen's first, second, or tenth most popular film. No, I did not look up its DVD rentals. Stuff like that is boring to me.

Hannah and Her Sisters is, I assume you would both agree, ONE OF Woody Allen's more well-known and popular films. 

 

My post was about a scene in the film, and a theme that often escapes Allen's detractors. The film's specific degree of popularity was irrelevant. I regret the error. I should not have mentioned anything about popularity, it was clearly a great distraction for you two.

I tend to get distracted very easily.

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I tend to get distracted very easily.

 

I also get distracted easily.   e.g.   take the revised picture for Edith.   That was the first thing I noticed today.    Who knows why that got my attention,  but I would rather look at a picture of Grace Kelly then Edith's head.

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I also get distracted easily.   e.g.   take the revised picture for Edith.   That was the first thing I noticed today.    Who knows why that got my attention,  but I would rather look at a picture of Grace Kelly then Edith's head.

At least you knew it was Grace Kelly. I was distracted while looking at the picture, and couldn't tell who it was. I knew it was no longer Edith Head. I thought it might have been Edith Bunker.

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And obviously in the opposite, as you stated, it has not:

 

I think this thread may have had its time in the sun, and all good things must come to an end.

 

but continues to be popular. Yup, it is amusing, sarcastically amusing. Nope, nuthin' wrong with nuthin'. :D

 

And no, I still don't care that the perv Woody Allen is popular. I like his films, as I like the films of the other perv, Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Not to worry, this thread ain't gone nowhere. Woody Allen has a magnificent body of work, too bad he had to muck it up with his pervy private life.

 

 

I don't know why it's amusing.
I went out of my way to say that it looked to me as though the thread was "passing away", and that that was ok, all good things must come to an end, etc.

 

Then I said there was something I wanted to say about Woody Allen's films, and that one film in particular, Hannah and Her Sisters, before it did (pass away - the thread, I mean.)

 

So of course I bumped it up. I'd been meaning to say that about HAHS for some time on this thread, and I wanted to say it before the thread faded into obscurity.

 

Ain't nothin wrong with that, is there?

 

 

 

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And obviously in the opposite, as you stated, it has not:

 

I think this thread may have had its time in the sun, and all good things must come to an end.

 

but continues to be popular. Yup, it is amusing, sarcastically amusing. Nope, nuthin' wrong with nuthin'. :D

 

And no, I still don't care that the perv Woody Allen is popular. I like his films, as I like the films of the other perv, Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Not to worry, this thread ain't gone nowhere. Woody Allen has a magnificent body of work, too bad he had to muck it up with his pervy private life.

Ok primos X 2. Yes, the thread has continued, but quite possibly- in fact, probably - because I revived it. I'm guessing that it was on its last gasps before I dredged it up again from page 3 or however the pages go now in this brave new world.

Anyway, it's a trivial point. Let us both regard ourselves as above such quibbling. If people still want to talk about Mr. Konigsberg, it's fine with me.

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An interesting question.  I haven't seen much of his latest work because one film "Melinda and Melinda" (or something like that) several years was so unmemorable I decided to skip any of his future movies, though I do love "Hannah and Her Sisters" and a few of his older ones.

 

Recently I had planned to see "The Grand Budapest Hotel" until a TV preview showed a cat thrown out the window.  Apparently an employee throws a guest's cat out the window to its death on the pavement below.  I assume that was meant to be amusing.  A New Yorker writer did a piece on Wes Anderson's portrayal of animals in his other films (which I've not seen), and they do not fare well.  I decided against seeing this film, and don't plan to see any of his others.  Nothing worse than seeing an animal on screen and worrying and wondering if it will be cruelly bumped off at some point in the picture!  (I still haven't gotten over a mule being shot in "Merrill's Marauder's"--my mother had to take me out to the lobby.)   Call me silly, but I guess it's just a matter of individual conscience.  

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MissW, I too just love that scene in HAHS when he walks into the theater and muses over the Marx Brothers movie. I like that he uses the word "absurdity" to describe human life.

 

Also recall Allen's PURPLE ROSE OF CAIRO ends in a movie theater with the lead charactor watching Astaire & Rogers dancing in the CHEEK TO CHEEK number. A perfect touch.

 

My favorite line from HAHS that always kills me is when the Allen charactor whines to his assistant & friend, "cause it hit me, all right, so, you know, I'm not going to go today I'm not going to go tomorrow, but eventually, I'm going to DIE."

 

And Kavner replies, "You're just realizing this now?"

I love the utter horror and simplicity of that scene. Kavner's delivery of the line is perfect.

 

Kind of like Bob Newhart's sketch of the psychiatrist- when the client complains about his life Newhart simply states, "Well, get over it."

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Just wanted to add that as perverse as Woody Allen may be in his personal life, his films are certainly restrained. Even when the actual subject of the film is sex, as in A MIDSUMMER NIGHT SEX COMEDY ('82) and VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA('08) there is no nudity or crass off color language.

 

Woody Allen films don't include much to offend my mother, nor embarrass me in front of a teen. It just goes to show a good movie can be made without:

•super special effects

•sex

•bad language

•tired rock & roll hits 

 

Rather than judge the guy on his personal mores, I'd rather judge his work. Who knows what went on in that household? Although it strikes me as kind of weird, he did nothing illegal, it's really none of my business.

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