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  • 2 months later...

I find it interesting that sometimes the actors in a movie poster don't look much like the actual actors in the the movie.   Some are right on.   

 

I assume that some of the images are from photos and of course they look like the actor.   But some that are 'right on' look like drawings while other drawings are 'off'.

 

 

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A print of this film exists -- anyone here seen it?

 

A rare appearance from Jeanne Eagels, but note especially how Gilbert is cringing in fear and hiding behind Eagels's skirt -- hardly the image you'd think a studio would want to present for their superstar leading man.

 

Uwxp6G6.jpg

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note especially how Gilbert is cringing in fear and hiding behind Eagels's skirt -- hardly the image you'd think a studio would want to present for their superstar leading man.

 

In keeping with his slightly unusual character in the film, an innocent "Mama's boy". The film emphasizes its moral that young men ought to spend their evenings at home with their mother and not go running after fascinating society editors - that spells big time trouble.

 

But to balance that image:

 

iHiYK6W.jpg

 

Can't blame John for being fascinated, though:

 

FxBpldV.jpg

 

An1S86W.jpg

 

I've seen it in a 15th-generation copy ... One for the restoration dept.?

 

On a more light-hearted note, My Lady of Whims (1925) also moralizes against the wild life, in typical 1920s having-your-cake-and-

eat-it fashion. It plays almost like a precursor to Breakfast at Tiffany's: Clara Bow runs around with a bohemian Greenwich Village crowd, but what she really wants is Peppardian square Donald Keith to dress her down and steer her into the decent way of life...

 

IoFnGQi.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not movie-related  -- and I've complained plenty when people posted non-movie stuff in the Interesting Pic thread... But I'm gonna post it here anyway, since it is poster-related, and some poster expert may have the answers for my questions (after the photo):

 

Women creating World War II propaganda posters in Port Washington, New York -- July 8th, 1942

 

fn6UajP.jpg

 

 

I'm posting this to ask: Why are these women all working on the same poster? Wouldn't SOP be to make one poster and then have it mass-produced? What process would be used for this mass production? And to make it semi-relevant to this thread, were movie posters made this way?

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