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TCM On Demand (Comcast)


jakeem
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TCM On Demand for January 13, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:                                                                                                                                  
1. Gidget Goes to Rome (1963) -- James Darren, Cindy Carol, Don Porter, Jeff Donnell, Jessie Royce Landis, Cesare Danova, Danielle de Metz, Joby Baker, Trudi Ames, Noreen Corcoran, Peter Brooks, Lisa Gastoni, Claudio Gora. Carol became the third actress (after Sandra Dee and Deborah Walley) to play Frances "Francie" Lawrence, the teen known in Malibu surfing circles as "Gidget" (girl + midget = her nickname). Having graduated from high school, she joins her boyfriend Moondoggie (Darren) and several friends on a summer vacation to Rome. The group is chaperoned by the eccentric Albertina Blythe (Landis). Gidget's parents are played by Porter and Donnell. Porter went on to reprise the role of Russ Lawrence in the 1965-1966 ABC television version of "Gidget" that starred Sally Field.
The film was directed by Paul Wendkos ("The Mephisto Waltz"), who was behind the camera for the first two efforts based on novel by Frederick Kohner -- "Gidget" (1959) and "Gidget Goes Hawaiian" (1961).
 
Expires January 19, 2015.
 
2. Luise Rainer: Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival (2011) -- Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne sits down with actress Luise Rainer (pronounced RYE-ner), who, at the time the session was filmed, reigned as the oldest-living Academy Award winner for acting. She died on December 30, 2014, less than two weeks shy of her 105th birthday. TCM observed her birth and death on Monday, January 12, 2015 by scheduling seven of her movies and this interview filmed in 2010. The German-born actress, who lived her final years in London, was the first person in history to win back-to-back acting Oscars. She won the 1936 Best Actress award for her performance in "The Great Ziegfeld" and then followed it with the 1937 Best Actress award for "The Good Earth."
 
Expires January 19, 2015.
 
3. Roman Holiday (1953) -- Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, Eddie Albert, Hartley Power, Harcourt Williams, Margaret Rawlings, Tullio Carminati, Paolo, Carlini, Claudio Ermelli, Paola Borboni, Alfredo Rizzo, Laura Solari, Gorella Gori. For her performance in this film, Hepburn won the Academy Award for Best Actress and became a major star. Directed by William Wyler, the black-and-white romantic tale stars Peck as an American journalist who becomes the unwitting companion of an AWOL European princess (Hepburn) during her official visit to Rome. 
The film also won Oscars for Best Writing, Motion Picture Story (credited to Ian McLellan Hunter, a front for the blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo) and Best Black-and-White Costume Design (Edith Head). It received nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Albert), Best Writing, Screenplay (Hunter, John Dighton), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Franz Planer, Henri Alekan), Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Set Decoration (Hal Pereira, Walter H. Tyler) and Best Film Editing (Robert Swink).
 
Memorable scene: The writer tells the princess the legend of the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth), which is located in the portico of the Church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin:
 
 

Classy move: This was Peck's movie in terms of star billing, but he was so impressed by Hepburn's work that he insisted both their names should come before the film's title in the opening credits. Her credit says "Introducing Audrey Hepburn," although she had appeared in seven other films before this one.

 

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One of 12: Hepburn's Oscar was the first of the four major entertainment awards that she won. She became one of only 12 people to achieve EGOT status -- winning at least one Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony. She picked up a 1954 Tony for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play for her role in "Ondine." After her death on January 20, 1993, she was voted a Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Individual Achievement – Informational Programming for her PBS series "Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn." She also earned a posthumous Grammy in 1994 in the Best Spoken Word Album for Children category for "Audrey Hepburn's Enchanted Tales." 

 
Expires January 19, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for January 14, 2015

 

The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:  

 

1. The Chase (1966) -- Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Martha Hyer, Richard Bradford, Robert Duvall, James Fox, Diana Hyland, Henry Hull, Jocelyn Brando, Katherine Walsh, Lori Martin, Marc Seaton, Paul Williams, Clifton James, Malcolm Atterbury, Nydia Westman, Joel Fluellen, Steve Ihnat, Maurice Manson, Bruce Cabot, Steve Whittaker, Pamela Curran, Ken Renard. Uncredited actors: Eduardo Ciannelli, Davis Roberts, Grady Sutton. Redford, Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month for January 2015, stars as Bubber Reeves, an escaped convict who shakes up his Southern hometown when it appears he is headed back there. Brando plays the town's sheriff, who has many other problems to deal with besides being on the lookout for the escapee.

 

In the following clip, the sheriff tries to protect Bubber from town vigilantes. Meanwhile, Bubber's wife Anna (Fonda) watches helplessly as her wealthy and powerful lover (Fox) is seriously wounded after an explosion. 

 


 

Produced by Sam Spiegel and directed by Arthur Penn ("Bonnie and Clyde," "Little Big Man"), the film's screenplay was adapted by Lillian Hellman from a 1950s novel-turned-play by Horton Foote.

Redford and Fonda appeared in the same film two other times -- in the 1967 screen version of Neil Simon's play "Barefoot in the Park," and in the 1979 Western romantic comedy "The Electric Horseman."

Redford would later co-star with Duvall in "The Natural" (1984), and direct Bradford in "The Milagro Beanfield War" (1988). Expires January 20, 2015.

 

This was the penultimate film in the long career of Hopkins, who plays the mother of the prison escapee. Her final screen role was in the 1970 film "Savage Intruder." Hyer, who co-stars as Mary Fuller, died on May 31, 2014 at the age of 89.

 


Expires January 20, 2015.

 


2. Inside Daisy Clover (1965) -- Natalie Wood, Christopher Plummer, Robert Redford, Ruth Gordon, Roddy McDowall, Katharine Bard, Peter Helm, Betty Harford, John Hale, Harold Gould, Ottola Nesmith, Edna Holland. Tale of a Depression-era teen (Wood) who becomes an overnight success as a movie star despite many trials and tribulations. 

 

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Wood

 

This was the first of three films in which Wood and Redford appeared together. The two others: "This Property Is Condemned" (1966) and "The Candidate" (1972, in which Wood appears briefly as herself). Based on the novel by Gavin Lambert -- who adapted it for the movie's screenplay -- the film was produced by Alan J. Pakula and directed by Robert Mulligan, the team that brought "To Kill a Mockingbird" to the screen. 

 

The film received three Academy Award nominations: Best Supporting Actress (Gordon), Best Color Art Direction-Set Decoration (Robert Clatworthy, George James Hopkins) and Best Color Costume Design (Edith Head, Bill Thomas).

 

Plummer, a standout as hard-nosed film producer Raymond Swan, starred in another picture of interest released the same year -- "The Sound of Music." 

 

Memorable scene: After experiencing a series of setbacks -- including a failed marriage to actor Wade Lewis (Redford) and the death of her mother (Gordon), Daisy suffers an emotional breakdown while looping a musical performance at a movie studio:


 



 


Expires January 20, 2015.

 


3. This Property Is Condemned (1966) -- Natalie Wood, Robert Redford, Charles Bronson, Kate Reid, Mary Badham, Alan Baxter, Robert Blake, Dabney Coleman, John Harding, Ray Hemphill, Brett Pearson, Jon Provost, Bob Random, Quintin Sondergaard, Mike Steen, Bruce Watson. Uncredited: Nick Stuart. This Great Depression-era drama, based on a one-act play by Tennessee Williams, stars Redford as Owen Legate, a railroad representative who comes to a small town Mississippi town with bad news. Many railway workers are to be laid off because of hard times. Meanwhile, Legate becomes enamored with Alva Starr (Wood), the desirable daughter of the local boardinghouse owner (Reid).

 

This was the first of many collaborations between Redford and director Sydney Pollack. Among their other films together: "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972), "The Way We Were" (1973), "Three Days of the Condor" (1975), "The Electric Horseman" (1979), "Out of Africa" (1985) and "Havana" (1990).

 

Badham, Oscar-nominated as Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird," plays Alva Starr's younger sister Willie. After this film was released, she retired from filmmaking at the age of 14. She returned in 2005 for a small role in the film "Our Very Own," which starred David Carradine and Allison Janney. Her older brother John Badham achieved success as a director with such films as "Saturday Night Fever" (1977), "War Games" (1983), "Blue Thunder" (1983), "Short Circuit" (1985) and "Stakeout" (1986). He continues to stay busy in 2015 as the director of recent television episodes of "Supernatural," "12 Monkeys" and "Constantine."

 

Expires January 20, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 15, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:
 
1. Bikini Beach (1964) -- Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, Keenan Wynn, Martha Hyer, Don Rickles, Harvey Lembeck, John Ashley, Jody McCrea, Candy Johnson, Danielle Aubry, Janos Prohaska, Sheila MacRae, Meredith MacRae, Delores Wells, Paul Smith, James Westerfield, Timothy Carey, Michael Nader, Donna Loren, Little Stevie Wonder, Boris Karloff. Directed and co-written by William Asher, this was the third of seven installments in the popular "Beach Party" series of films produced by American International Pictures. Avalon plays a dual role as beach regular Frankie and a British singer named Potato Bug.
 
 
Asher, who helmed most of the "Beach Party" movies, directed numerous episodes of the television series "I Love Lucy" and "Bewitched." The latter show starred his wife Elizabeth Montgomery (who provides the voice of Yvonne the Lady Bug for this film). The director of photography for the movie was Academy Award-winning cinematographer Floyd Crosby ("Tabu," "High Noon"), the father of rock great David Crosby of the Byrds and Crosby, Stills and Nash.
 

Expires January 21, 2015.

 
 
2. The Lady from Shanghai (1947) -- Rita Hayworth, Orson Welles, Everett Sloane, Glenn Anders, Ted de Corsia, Erskine Sanford, Gus Schilling, Carl Frank, Louis Merrill, Evelyn Ellis, Harry Shannon. Uncredited: Errol Flynn, William Alland. Welles -- who also directed, produced and co-adapted the screenplay-- stars as Michael O'Hara, the movie's worldly protagonist and narrator. He becomes involved in a boatload of intrigue when he goes to work for a high-powered West Coast couple -- the seductive title character (Hayworth, Mrs. Welles at the time) and her husband (Sloane), an attorney with a disability. 
 
In the following scene, O'Hara finds himself enchanted by the charms of his employer's wife: 
 
 
The 2007 documentary "Spine Tingler! The William Castle Story," directed by Jeffrey Schwarz, reveals that producer-director Castle ("The Tingler," "House on Haunted Hill") optioned the movie rights for the 1938 novel "If I Die Before I Wake" by Sherwood King. Castle hoped to direct it at Columbia Pictures, and asked Welles to talk about it with studio chief Harry Cohn. But Cohn would only give it a green light if Welles directed it. It was retitled "The Lady from Shanghai." Although the picture did not do well at the box office in its original run, it is considered to be one of Welles' best films -- and a film noir classic.

 

Expires January 21, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 16, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:
 
1. Colorado Territory (1949) -- Joel McCrea, Virginia Mayo, Dorothy Malone, Henry Hull, John Archer, James Mitchell, Morris Ankrum, Basil Ruysdael, Frank Puglia, Ian Wolfe, Harry Woods, Houseley Stevenson. Uncredited: Victor Kilian, Maudie Prickett, James Mitchum. Directed by Raoul Walsh, this is a Western remake of the 1941 Humphrey Bogart film "High Sierra," which was filmed by Walsh. McCrea stars as outlaw Wes McQueen, who breaks out of jail to participate in a train robbery. He begins to have second thoughts after he meets a woman (Malone) he would consider settling down with.
The movie's screenwriters were Edmund H. North, who shared the 1970 Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Francis Ford Coppola for "Patton," and John Twist.

 

Expires January 22, 2015.

 
 
2. The Great Train Robbery (1979) -- Sir Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland, Lesley-Anne Down, Alan Webb, Malcolm Terris, Robert Lang, Michael Elphick, Wayne Sleep, Pamela Salem, Gabrielle Lloyd, George Downing, James Cossins, John Bett, Peter Benson, Janine Duvitski, Brian De Salvo, André Morell. Uncredited: Brooke Adams. Michael Crichton directed this caper film -- set in mid-19th-century England -- about a meticulous plan to rob a train of its gold shipment. The mastermind behind the bold heist is Edward Pierce (Connery), who assembles a top-notch team, including characters played by Sutherland and Down.
The film, with a screenplay written by Crichton, was based on his 1975 novel of the same title. He modeled the tale after a real-life incident that occurred in England in 1855.
 
This was one of the last pictures photographed by the great British cinematographer Geoffrey Unsworth, who died in October 1978 -- four months before the film's release in America. He was voted a posthumous 1980 Academy Award for "Tess" (shared with Ghislain Cloquet, who completed the film). Both "Superman" (1978) and this film were dedicated to Unsworth.
 
Connery did many of his own stunts atop a moving train, and reportedly almost fell off at one point:
 
 

Expires January 22, 2015.

 

 

3. Man of the West (1958) -- Gary Cooper, Julie London, Lee J. Cobb, Arthur O'Connell, Jack Lord, John Dehner, Royal Dano, Robert J. Wilke. Uncredited: Frank Ferguson, Chuck Roberson. Director Anthony Mann, known for his Western movies with James Stewart ("The Man from Laramie," "The Naked Spur"), collaborated with Cooper for the first time. In a role intended for Stewart, Cooper stars as a former outlaw-turned-respected pillar of a Western community. When he sets out by train on a special mission to hire a new schoolteacher, he runs into some of his former gang members. They pressure him to help them pull a bank robbery.

 

This was one of the final films in Cooper's long and prestigious career. He died of cancer at the age of 60 on May 13, 1961, a month after the presentation of a special Academy Award "for his many memorable screen performances and the international recognition he, as an individual, has gained for the motion picture industry." The award was accepted for the ailing Cooper by Stewart.

 

Expires January 22, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 17, 2015

 

The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Neil Simon's 'Chapter Two' (1977) -- James Caan, Marsha Mason, Joseph Bologna, Valerie Harper, Alan Fudge, Judy Farrell, Debra Mooney, Isabel Cooley, Imogene Bliss, Barry Michlin, Ray Young, Greg Zadikov, Dr. Paul Singh, Sumant Sumant, Cheryl Bianchi. Mason, who was married to playwright Simon from 1973 to 1983, received her third of four Oscar nominations as Best Actress for this film. The story was based on Simon's stage play about his real-life romance with Mason after the death of his first wife. Expires January 23, 2015.

 

 

2. Jack the Giant Killer (1962) -- Kerwin Mathews, Judi Meredith, Torin Thatcher, Walter Burke, Don Beddoe, Barry Kelley, Dayton Lummis, Anna Lee, Roger Mobley, Robert Gist, Tudor Owen, Ken Mayer. Mathews and Thatcher played adversaries in the 1958 fantasy "The 7th Voyage of Sinbad." They battled again in this film by Nathan Juran, the director of the earlier film.

 



 


Mathews plays the title character, a farm boy who must battle a powerful wizard (Thatcher) in order to protect a beautiful princess (Meredith). The actress, who retired from acting in the early 1970s, died on April 30, 2014 at the age of 77.


 


Expires January 23, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 18, 2015

 

The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Contraband (1940) -- Conrad Veidt, Valerie Hobson, Hay Petrie, Joss Ambler, Raymond Lovell, Esmond Knight, Charles Victor, Phoebe Kershaw, Harold Warrender, John Longden, Eric Maturin, Paddy Browne, Henry Wolston, Julian Vedey, Sydney Moncton, Hamilton Keen, Leo Genn, Stuart Latham, Peter Bull. Uncredited: Milo O'Shea. Torin Thatcher. Originally titled "Blackout" in the United Kingdon, this World War II drama was an early film collaboration by the acclaimed team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. In this instance, Powell directed while Pressburger came up with the story and screenplay. The film reteams Veidt and Hobson, who starred previously starred in "The Spy in Black" (1939), the first Powell-Pressburger production.


A young Deborah Kerr filmed scenes as a cigarette girl, but they did not make it into the finished film.

 


Expires January 24, 2015.



 

 

2. Foreign Correspondent (1940) -- Joel McCrea, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Albert Basserman, Robert Benchley, Eduardo Ciannelli, Edmund Gwenn, Harry Davenport. Sir Alfred Hitchcock's first American film was "Rebecca," which won the 1940 Academy Award for Best Picture. But the British-born filmmaker also had a second Best Picture contender with this spectacular thriller that anticipated the outbreak of World War II. McCrea stars as Johnny Jones, a hard-nosed newspaper reporter for the fictional New York Globe. When the publication's editor (Davenport) decides he needs a top-notch correspondent to cover the gathering storm in Europe, he gives the job to Jones and rechristens him "Huntley Haverstock." Upon his arrival in London, Jones/Haverstock immediately becomes involved in international political intrigue that puts his life in danger.



 

Memorable scene No. 1: Gwenn, who won an Oscar for playing Santa Claus in "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), appears as Haverstock's "genial" bodyguard who tries to dispose of the foreign correspondent by pushing him from the bell tower of Westminster Cathedral. Gwenn was a Hitchcock favorite who appeared in four of the director's films between 1931 and 1955.

 

Memorable scene No. 2: An airplane carrying Haverstock and other principal characters is shot down over the Atlantic Ocean by a German destroyer. Hitchcock filmed the shooting and the resulting crash into the ocean from the point of view of the passengers.

 


 

In a 1972 interview on ABC's "The Dick Cavett Show," Hitchcock explained how the plane crash sequence was shot:

 


 

Hitch's traditional cameo: It occurs approximately 12 minutes into the film as Haverstock walks out of a hotel and encounters the Dutch diplomat Van Meer (Basserman).

 

The role of Haverstock originally was offered to actor Gary Cooper, who declined it. The actor later expressed regrets about not accepting the part. Unfortunately, McCrea, despite his solid work in this movie, never worked with Hitchcock again. Besides the Best Picture nomination, the film earned five other nods for the 13th Academy Awards held on February 27, 1941: Best Supporting Actor (Basserman, for a double role), Best Writing, Original Screenplay (Charles Bennett and Joan Harrison), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Rudolph Maté), Best Black-and-White Art Direction (Alexander Golitzen) and Best Special Effects (Paul Eagler, photographic; Thomas T. Moulton, sound). Harrison later became a producer of Hitchcock's long-running anthology series on television during the 1950s and 1960s. 

 

Expires January 24, 2015.

 

 

3. Maximum Overdrive (1986) -- Emilio Estevez, Pat Hingle, Laura Harrington, Yeardley Smith, John Short, Ellen McElduff, J.C. Quinn, Christopher Murney, Holter Graham, Frankie Faison, Pat Miller, Jack Canon, Barry Bell, John Brasington, J. Don Ferguson, Leon Rippy, Giancarlo Esposito, Marla Maples. Stephen King made his debut as a director with this apocalyptic horror tale about machines creating havoc after the Earth passes through a comet's tail. The author also wrote the screenplay, adapted from his short story "Trucks," and appears briefly as a man at an ATM.

A year after this film was released, Smith, who plays Connie, began serving as the voice of Lisa Simpson in animated shorts on "The Tracey Ullman Show" on FOX. Almost 30 years -- and one Primetime Emmy -- later, she is still performing as Lisa on "The Simpsons."

 

The film's soundtrack was provided by the rock group AC/DC, King's favorite band.

 



Expires January 24, 2015.


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TCM On Demand for January 19, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:
 
1. Fiddler on the Roof (1971) -- Topol, Norma Crane, Leonard Frey, Molly Picon, Paul Mann, Rosalind Harris, Michele Marsh, Neva Small, Paul Michael Glaser, Raymond Lovelock, Elaine Edwards, Candy Bonstein, Shimen Ruskin, Zvee Scooler, Louis Zorich. Norman Jewison ("In the Heat of the Night," "Moonstruck") directed and co-produced this screen version of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical based on the tales of Yiddish author Sholem Aleichem (1859-1916). Composer John Williams, who has earned a whopping 49 Academy Award nominations during his prolific career, received his first of five Oscars for his Best Song Score Adaptation. Oscars also went to Oswald Morris for his cinematography and to Gordon McCallum and David Hildyard for Best Sound. The British-born Morris died on March 17, 2014 at the age of 98.
 
The film also was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Topol), Best Supporting Actor (Frey) and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Robert F. Boyle, Michael Stringer and Peter Lamont).
 
Set in early 20th-century Russia -- on the eve of repressive anti-Jewish pogroms -- the film stars the Israeli actor Topol as Tevye the milkman, the role originated on Broadway by Zero Mostel in 1964. The movie's screenplay was adapted by Joseph Stein; the music was composed by Jerry Bock with lyrics by Sheldon Harnick. Among the familiar musical numbers featured in the film: "Tradition," "Matchmaker," "To Life," "Sunrise, Sunset," "Do You Love Me?" and "If I Were a Rich Man."
 
 
Expires January 25, 2015.
 
 
2. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) -- Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Philip Alford, Brock Peters, Robert Duvall, William Windom, Frank Overton, Rosemary Murphy, Ruth White, Collin Wilcox, Paul Fix, John Megna, Estelle Evans, James Anderson, Alice Ghostley, Crahan Denton, Richard Hale. Uncredited actors: Kim Stanley (narrator), Bill Walker. Peck won his only Academy Award for his performance as Atticus Finch, a gentlemanly lawyer who takes on a controversial case in his Alabama hometown. The widower father of two children -- Jem (Alford) and Scout (Badham) -- defends Tom Robinson (Peters), a black man falsely accused of assaulting a white woman (Wilcox). Produced by Alan J. Pakula and directed by Robert Mulligan, the film was based on the 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee. In addition to Peck's Best Actor win, the drama also received Oscars for Best Adapted Screenplay (Horton Foote) and Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Set Decoration (Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead and Oliver Emert). The film received nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actress (Badham), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Russell Harlan) and Best Original Score (Elmer Bernstein).
 

In 1998, the American Film Institute ranked the film No. 34 on its list of the 100 greatest movies of all time. When AFI updated the list in 2007, the film climbed to No. 25.

On June 4, 2003, CBS televised a special about AFI's survey of the top heroes and villains in movie history. Atticus Finch was the No. 1 hero, followed by Indiana Jones ("Raiders of the Lost Ark"), James Bond ("Dr. No"), Rick Blaine ("Casablanca") and Marshal Will Kane ("High Noon"). The No. 1 villain was Dr. Hannibal Lecter of "The Silence of the Lambs."

 

Eight days after the AFI special aired, Peck died of bronchopneumonia at the age of 87. At a public memorial service in Los Angeles on June 16, 2003, Peck was eulogized by actor Peters, who had become a friend after the filming of this movie. "In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love," Peters said. "Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure. To this day, the children of 'Mockingbird'...call him Atticus."

 

In 2005, Bernstein's score placed 17th on the American Film Institute's ranking of the top 25 film scores of all time. It was one of two Bernstein compositions on the list. The other: His score for "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), which ranked No. 7.

 

The novel was Lee's only published work until 2015. It was announced in February that "Go Set a Watchman," a work of fiction written by the author in the 1950s but presumed lost, will be released in July. The book, set in the '50s, reportedly focuses on the adult Scout Finch and her relationship with her father 20 years after the events in the first novel.

This movie marked the screen debut of Duvall (as Boo Radley), who is still going strong in movies 53 years later. On January 15, 2015, 10 days after his 84th birthday, he received his seventh Academy Award nomination. He was honored in the Best Supporting Actor category for his performance as the title character in "The Judge." Duvall won the 1983 Best Actor Oscar for his work in the drama "Tender Mercies."

 
 
Memorable quote: "Miss Jean Louise. Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father's passing" -- The Reverend Sykes (Walker), speaking to Scout, who sat next to him in the courthouse balcony -- the "blacks only" section -- during Robinson's trial. As attorney Finch prepares to leave the courtroom after his stirring but unsuccessful defense, all of the people in the section rise to their feet. Finch, lost in thought, is oblivious to their tribute.
 
Memorable dialogue: 
 
Jem: How old were you when you got your first gun, Atticus?
 
Atticus Finch: Thirteen or 14. I remember when my daddy gave me that gun. He told me that I should never point it at anything in the house. And that he'd rather I'd shoot at tin cans in the backyard. But he said that sooner or later he supposed the temptation to go after birds would be too much. And that I could shoot all the blue jays I wanted, if I could hit 'em. But to remember it was a sin to kill a mockingbird.
 
Jem: Why?
 
Atticus Finch: Well, I reckon because mockingbirds don't do anything but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat people's gardens, don't nest in the corncribs. They don't do one thing but just sing their hearts out for us.
 

Observations: The character of Dill (played by Megna) was based on Lee's best friend since childhood, author Truman Capote...Actress Catherine Keener earned an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Lee in the 2005 biopic "Capote." The film provided a Best Actor Oscar for the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, who played the author as he conducted research on his 1965 nonfiction best seller "In Cold Blood"...Sandra Bullock appeared as Lee in another film about Capote, the 2006 drama "Infamous," in which British actor Toby Jones portrayed the author.

 

In memoriam: Murphy, the Emmy Award-winning actress who appears as Miss Maudie Atkinson, died of cancer on July 5, 2014. She was 89. Her Emmy win was for her portrayal of FDR's mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, in the 1976 made-for-television movie "Eleanor and Franklin."

 
Would you believe? In a 1969 episode of the sitcom "Get Smart," CONTROL agents Maxwell Smart (Don Adams) and 99 (Barbara Feldon) went to Mexico in search of the famed figurine known as the Tequila Mockingbird.
 
Expires January 25, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for January 20, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:
 

1. The Defiant Ones (1958) -- Tony Curtis, Sidney Poitier, Theodore Bikel, Charles McGraw, Lon Chaney, Jr., King Donovan, Claude Akins, Lawrence Dobkin, Whit Bissell, Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Kevin Coughlin, Cara Williams. Uncredited: Ned Glass. Stanley Kramer's drama about escaped convicts -- one white (Curtis) and one black (Poitier) -- received nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. It also earned Best Actor nominations for its two stars, making Poitier the first black performer to be honored in that category. The Oscar went to David Niven of "Separate Tables," but Poitier would win the 1963 Best Actor award for his performance in "Lilies of the Field."

 

 

The drama won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay (Nedrick Young and Harold Jacob Smith. Young, who had been blacklisted, was nominated under the pseudonym Nathan E. Douglas. His true credit was restored by the Academy after his death). The film also was honored for Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Sam Leavitt).

 

Its other Oscar nominations were: Best Supporting Actor (Bikel); Best Supporting Actress (Williams) and Best Film Editing (Frederick Knudtson).

 

Although he played Max Muller, a Southern sheriff in this film, Bikel actually was born in Austria and grew up in Palestine (now Israel). He moved to London in the 1940s and then to the United States in the 1950s. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1961. Bikel, who died on July 20, 2015 at the age of 91, also was an accomplished singer and recording artist. Interestingly, he lost the Best Supporting Actor Oscar to another renowned actor-musician, Burl Ives of "The Big Country."

 

Despite being honored for her performance in a drama, Williams earned a reputation as a comedic actress on television. She starred with Harry Morgan in the CBS situation comedy "Pete and Gladys" (a spinoff of "December Bride") from 1960 to 1962. She then headlined another CBS sitcom -- "The Cara Williams Show" -- during the 1964-1965 season. Williams was married to actor John Drew Barrymore -- the father of Drew Barrymore -- from 1952 to 1959. They had a son, John Blyth Barrymore, who also became an actor.

 

 

Expires January 26, 2015.


 

2. Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) -- Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Sidney Poitier, Katharine Houghton, Cecil Kellaway, Beah Richards, Roy E. Glenn, Sr., Virginia Christine, Alexandra Hay, Isabel Sanford, Barbara Randolph, D'Urville Martin. Stanley Kramer's comedy/drama about an interracial relationship received 10 Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture. It also was Tracy's last film -- he died at the age of 67 on June 10, 1967, 17 days after completing it. He received a Best Actor nomination posthumously, but the Oscar went to Rod Steiger of "In the Heat of the Night" (the year's Best Picture winner). Hepburn, Tracy's longtime partner onscreen and off, won a Best Actress Oscar for the film -- her first since the 1932-33 award she won at the age of 26 for "Morning Glory." Despite his status as the No. 1 box-office star for 1967, Poitier did not receive an Academy Award nomination. He also starred in two other hit films that year -- "In the Heat of the Night" and "To Sir, With Love." Houghton, whose screen debut was in the role of Tracy and Hepburn's daughter, actually was Hepburn's niece. Both actresses were named for Hepburn's mother, the opinionated New England suffragette Katharine Martha Houghton Hepburn (1878-1951).

 

In 1999, AFI released its survey of history's 50 greatest screen legends -- the top 25 actresses and top 25 actors of all time. Tracy was the No. 7 male, followed by Poitier at No. 22. Hepburn was the was the No. 1 female. 

 
Memorable scene: Tracy's eight-minute long speech -- in which his character endorses his daughter's marriage plans -- was the last scene that the ailing actor ever filmed. Hepburn's teary-eyed reaction shots are unforgettable.
 


 
Memorable quote: "Dad...Dad, you're my father. I'm your son. I love you. I always have. And I always will. But you think of yourself as a colored man. I think of myself as a man" -- John Prentiss (Poitier) during an exchange of words with his concerned father (Glenn).

Kramer, who was nominated for Best Director for this project, was a socially conscious filmmaker applauded for such movies as "The Defiant Ones" (1958), "On the Beach" (1959), "Inherit the Wind" (1960), "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961) and "Ship of Fools" (1965). He also found the time to direct and produce the 1963 star-studded laugh riot with the lengthy title -- "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World." In 1975, Kramer directed a television version of the Tracy-Hepburn-Poitier film, starring Eleanor Parker (who died on December 9, 2013), Richard Dysart ("L.A. Law"), Leslie Charleson ("General Hospital") and Bill Overton. The 2005 comedy "Guess Who" flipped the premise of the original movie. In the new version, Ashton Kutcher's character romances a black woman played by Zoe Saldana, whose parents were played by Bernie Mac and Judith Scott. Richards, who received a Best Supporting Actress nomination as Poitier's sympathetic mother, also appeared with the actor in "In the Heat of the Night," in which she played a medicine woman named Mama Caleba. This was one of the final feature film roles for veteran actor Kellaway, who earned a Best Supporting Actor nod as Monsignor Ryan. Sanford, who played the Drayton family's disapproving maid Tillie Binks, attained television immortality as Louise "Weezie" Jefferson during the long run of her CBS comedy series "The Jeffersons." In 1981, she became the first African-American woman to win a Primetime Emmy Award as the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series. 
 
 
Expires January 26, 2015.
 
3. One Potato, Two Potato (1964) -- Barbara Barrie, Bernie Hamilton, Richard Mulligan, Harry Bellaver, Marti Mericka, Robert Earl Jones, Vinnette Carroll, Sam Weston, Faith Burwell, Jack Stamberger, Michael Shane, Paul S. Orgill. For her performance in this film, directed by Larry Peerce ("Goodbye, Columbus," "The Other Side of the Mountain"), Barrie tied Anne Bancroft of "The Pumpkin Eater" for Best Actress at the 1964 Cannes Film Festival. She stars as a divorced white woman in Ohio who risks losing her young daughter after she marries a black man (Hamilton). Sure enough, her ex-husband (Mulligan) goes to court to win custody of the girl.
The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay (Orville H. Hampton and Raphael Hayes).

 

Expires January 26, 2015.
 

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TCM On Demand for January 21, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. The Great Gatsby (1974) -- Robert Redford, Mia Farrow, Sam Waterston, Bruce Dern, Karen Black, Scott Wilson, Lois Chiles, Howard Da Silva, Roberts Blossom, Edward Herrmann, Elliott Sullivan, Arthur Hughes, Kathryn Leigh Scott, Beth Porter, Paul Tamarin, John Devlin, Patsy Kensit, Marjorie Wildes, Blain Fairman, Bob Sherman, Norman Chancer, Regina Baff, Janet Arters, Louise Arters, Sammy Smith. Uncredited: Brooke Adams, Tom Ewell, Vincent Schiavelli. Francis Ford Coppola adapted this screen version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great American Novel about the Roaring Twenties. Redford stars as the title character, a mysterious man of wealth who throws lavish summer parties in Long Island, N.Y. Farrow is Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby's lost love who is now married to millionaire Tom Buchanan (Dern).

 

Directed by British filmmaker Jack Clayton ("Room at the Top"), this film won Academy Awards for Best Costume Design (Theoni V. Aldridge) and Best Adaptation Score (Nelson Riddle). Coppola's screenplay was not nominated, but he went on to win three 1974 Oscars -- Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay (with Mario Puzo) -- for "The Godfather Part II." 

 

This film is one of four screen versions based on Fitzgerald's 1925 novel. The first was a 1926 silent film starring Warner Baxter, Lois Wilson, Neil Hamilton, Georgia Hale and William Powell. It has been lost. A 1949 edition, headlined by Alan Ladd, Betty Field, Macdonald Carey, Ruth Hussey, Barry Sullivan, Shelley Winters and Da Silva, is seldom seen because of legal entanglements. It originally was to be directed by John Farrow, Mia's father.

 

A 2013 adaptation by Australian director Baz Luhrmann ("Moulin Rouge!" "Romeo + Juliet") starred Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Tobey Maguire, Joel Edgerton and Isla Fisher. Catherine Martin, Luhrmann's wife and co-producer, received Academy Awards for Best Costume Design and Best Production Design (shared with Beverley Dunn).

 

The role of Daisy in the 1974 version originally was to be played by Ali MacGraw, who was married to Paramount production chief Robert Evans. But when MacGraw became involved with Steve McQueen during the filming of Sam Peckinpah's 1972 caper film "The Getaway," the role went to Farrow. She also became the first person to appear on the cover of People magazine.

 

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Waterston, who plays the film's narrator Nick Carraway, went on to receive an Academy Award nomination as Best Actor for his portrayal of New York Times writer Sydney Schanberg in "The Killing Fields" (1984). He also starred in the long-running "Law and Order" television series and the recent HBO drama "The Newsroom."

 

Professional golfer Jordan Baker, Daisy's friend and Carraway's romantic interest, is played by Chiles, who appeared in her second consecutive film with Redford. She had a minor role in "The Way We Were" (1973). Chiles later co-starred -- as Dr. Holly Goodhead -- with Roger Moore in "Moonraker," the 1979 out-of-this-world James Bond film.

 

Wilson, who played veterinarian Hershel Greene in "The Walking Dead" television series, co-stars as George Wilson -- the husband of Tom's mistress Myrtle (Black) and the man who becomes the unfortunate catalyst for Gatsby's undoing. 

 

Kensit, who appears as Daisy's daughter Pamela Buchanan, was 6 years old when the film was released. She grew up to co-star as Mel Gibson's doomed South African love interest in "Lethal Weapon 2" (1989). In 1995, she portrayed her screen mother in the FOX television miniseries "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story," based on Farrow's rocky relationship with Woody Allen.

 

Herrmann, who plays a perpetual partygoer named Klipspringer, died on New Year's Eve, 2014 at the age of 71. The distinguished actor probably was best known for his recurring role as family partriarch Richard Gilmore on the television series "Gilmore Girls," and for his portrayals of Franklin Delano Roosevelt on screen and on TV.

 

Memorable quote: "I thought of Gatsby's wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy's dock. He had come a long way to this lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him" -- Carraway's final words in the film. Interestingly, the drama does not conclude with Fitzgerald's famous ending: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."
 

Expires January 27, 2015.

 
 
2. Out of Africa (1985) -- Meryl Streep, Robert Redford, Klaus Maria Brandauer, Michael Kitchen, Malick Bowens, Joseph Thiaka, Stephen Kinyanjui, Michael Gough, Suzanna Hamilton, Rachel Kempson, Graham Crowden, Leslie Phillips, Shane Rimmer, Mike Bugara, Job Seda, Mohammed Umar, Donal McCann, Kenneth Mason, Tristram Jellinek, Stephen B. Grimes, Annabel Maule, Benny Young, Iman. Sydney Pollack's film version of autobiographical material by the Danish author Isak Dinesen (and other sources) won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay (Kurt Luedtke). It also won for John Barry's original score and for Best Cinematography (David Watkin), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Stephen B. Grimes and Josie MacAvin) and Best Sound (Chris Jenkins, Gary Alexander, Larry Stensvold and Peter Handford).
In 2005, the American Film Institute selected the Top 25 film scores of all time. Barry's romantic composition for this movie was ranked No. 15. 
Streep, who received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress, portrays Karen Blixen (1885-1962), who wrote about her experiences in early 20th-century colonial Kenya under the pen name of Dinesen. The film details her unhappy marriage to a roguish Swedish baron (portrayed by Brandauer, who was nominated for Best Supporting Actor). And it focuses on her involvement with a dashing British aviator and hunter Denys Finch-Hatton (played by the All-American Redford).
 
 
 
This was one of many film collaborations between Pollack and Redford, who met as young actors during the filming of "War Hunt," a 1962 drama about the Korean conflict. After Pollack turned to directing in the mid-1960s, he and Redford teamed up for other projects, including "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972), "The Way We Were" (1973), "Three Days of the Condor" (1975), "The Electric Horseman" (1979) and "Havana" (1990).
 
Memorable quote: "I had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills." -- This was the opening sentence of Dinesen's 1937 book "Out of Africa," and it is one of the first lines of the movie, spoken by Streep as Blixen in a voiceover.
 
Expires January 27, 2015.
 
 
3. The Way We Were (1973) -- Barbra Streisand, Robert Redford, Bradford Dillman, Lois Chiles, James Woods, Patrick O'Neal, Sally Kirkland, Susan Blakely, Viveca Lindfors. Directed by Sydney Pollack, this very popular romantic drama is about opposites (Streisand, Redford) who fall in love and marry despite their differences. She's a liberal Jewish activist; he's a golden boy and an apolitical WASP. Their relationship begins at a college just before World War II. The film reaches its climax during the politically tumultuous McCarthy era of the early 1950s.
 
 
Marvin Hamlisch won two Academy Awards for this movie: Best Original Dramatic Score and Best Original Song (for the title tune, shared with lyricists Alan and Marilyn Bergman). Hamlisch picked up a third award on Oscar Night 1974, winning in the Best Original Song Score and/or Adaptation category for his use of Scott Joplin rags in "The Sting." Streisand's version of the title song became a No. 1 pop hit and a standard.
 
Redford and Kirkland also appeared together in "The Sting," which won the 1973 Best Picture Oscar and produced the onetime Sundance Kid's only Best Actor nomination. A year later, Redford co-starred with Chiles in the much-hyped remake of "The Great Gatsby," based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel.
 
Expires January 27, 2015.

 

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TCM On Demand for January 22, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. The Man in the Iron Mask (1939) -- Louis Hayward, Joan Bennett, Warren William, Joseph Schildkraut, Alan Hale, Sr., Walter Kingsford, Miles Mander, Bert Roach, Marion Martin, Montagu Love, Doris Kenyon, Albert Dekker, Nigel De Brulier, William Royle, Boyd Irwin, Howard Brooks, Reginald Barlow, Lane Chandler, Wyndham Standing, Dorothy Vaughan, Sheila Darcy, Robert Milasch, D'Arcy Corrigan, Harry Woods, Peter Cushing, Emmett King, The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir. Uncredited: Dwight Frye. Directed by James Whale ("Frankenstein," "The Bride of Frankenstein"), this swashbuckling film is set in 17th century France and based on the legendary tale by Alexandre Dumas the Elder ("The Three Musketeers"). Hayward plays the dual roles of King Louis XIV and Philippe of Gascony, his little-known twin brother. Philippe is a protégé of D'Artagnan (William) and the other famed Musketeers -- Athos (Roach), Porthos (Hale) and Aramis (Mander). The film is full of palace intrigue revolving around the machinations of Fouquet (Schildkraut), Louis' devious advisor, to secure the king's power.

The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Music, Original Score (Lud Gluskin, Lucien Moraweck ).

 

Expires January 28, 2015.  
 
2. A Place in the Sun (1951) -- Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, Shelley Winters, Anne Revere, Keefe Brasselle, Fred Clark, Raymond Burr, Herbert Heyes, Shepperd Strudwick, Frieda Inescort, Kathryn Givney, Walter Sande, Ted de Corsia, John Ridgely, Lois Chartrand. Uncredited: Kathleen Freeman, Kasey Rogers, Ian Wolfe. George Stevens' drama -- derived from Theodore Dreiser's 1925 novel "An American Tragedy" -- was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Clift) and Best Actress (Winters). It won six Oscars: Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay (Michael Wilson, Harry Brown), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (William C. Mellor), Best Black-and-White Costume Design (Edith Head), Best Film Editing (William Hornbeck) and Best Original Score (Franz Waxman).
 
 
In 1998, the American Film Institure ranked the film No. 92 on its list of the 100 greatest movies of all time. When AFI updated the list in 2007, the film did not make the Top 100. By the way, George Stevens, Jr., the son of the director, was a founder of AFI and its driving force from 1967 to 1980.
 
This was the first of three films that paired Clift and Taylor, who became great friends. They also co-starred in "Raintree County" (1957) and "Suddenly, Last Summer" (1959), both of which yielded Best Actress nominations for Taylor. It was after a visit to Taylor's residence that Clift sustained serious facial injuries as the result of an automobile accident on May 12, 1956. 
 
Taylor and George Stevens, Sr. worked together again on the screen project that earned the director his second Academy Award -- "Giant" (1956), based on the novel by Edna Ferber. His last film, the 1970 drama "The Only Game in Town," also featured Taylor.
 
Stevens directed Winters to her first of two Oscars for Best Supporting Actress in "The Diary of Anne Frank" (1959).
 
Memorable quote: "I love you. I've loved you since the first moment I saw you. I guess maybe I’ve even loved you before I saw you." -- George Eastman (Clift) to socialite Angela Vickers (Taylor).
 
Expires January 28, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for January 23, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1.  She Done Him Wrong (1933) -- Mae West, Cary Grant, Owen Moore, Gilbert Roland, Noah Beery, Sr., David Landau, Rafaela Ottiano, Dewey Robinson, Rochelle Hudson, Tammany Young, Fuzzy Knight, Grace La Rue, Robert Homas, Louise Beavers. This film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture of 1932-1933, and its success was credited with helping to save Paramount Pictures from bankruptcy during the Great Depression. The story is derived from "Diamond Lil," the racy 1928 Broadway hit written by West, its irrepressible star. In this version, directed by Lowell Sherman, she appears as Lady Lou, the No. 1 attraction at a popular 1890s Manhattan saloon that attracts both underworld figures and the police. Grant co-stars as the head of a Salvation Army-like organization who catches Lou's attention. Grant also appeared with West in another 1933 film, "I'm No Angel," but he wouldn't become a major star until the late 1930s.

 
Memorable scene: Lou flirts with Grant's character and tries to lure him to her dressing room. The famous and very forward question she asks him was ranked No.26 on the American Film Institute's 2005 list of the 100 greatest movie quotes of all time.
 
Expires January 29, 2015.
 
 
2. Trouble in Paradise (1932) -- Miriam Hopkins, Kay Francis, Herbert Marshall, Charlie Ruggles, Edward Everett Horton, Sir C. Aubrey Smith, Robert Greig, Leonid Kinskey, George Humbert. The great Ernst Lubitsch produced and directed this Pre-Code romantic comedy based on the 1931 Hungarian stage play "The Honest Finder." The film revolves around a pickpocket (Hopkins) who teams up with an accomplished thief (Marshall) to embezzle funds from the safe of a Parisian perfume manufacturer (Francis). The film's screenplay was adapted by Samson Raphaelson and Grover Jones, with contributions by Lubitsch. This was one of three films in which Hopkins was directed by Lubitsch. The others: "The Smiling Lieutenant" (1931) and "Design for Living" (1933). 
 
Expires January 29, 2015.
 
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TCM On Demand for January 24, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Neil Simon's 'Biloxi Blues' (1988) -- Matthew Broderick, Christopher Walken, Matt Mulhern, Corey Parker, Markus Flanagan, Casey Siemaszko, Michael Dolan, Penelope Ann Miller, Park Overall, Alan Pottinger, Mark Evan Jacobs, Dave Kienzle, Matthew Kimbrough, Kirby Mitchell, Allen Turner. Simon wrote the screenplay for this screen version of his 1985 Tony Award-winning play, the middle installment of his Eugene Morris Jerome trilogy. Jerome, played by Broderick in the semi-autobiographical play and the film, is an alter ego for Simon. Broderick won a 1983 Tony for playing the character on stage in "Brighton Beach Memoirs" (Jonathan Silverman took the role for the 1986 film version and for the third stage version, "Broadway Bound").

 
Expires January 30, 2015.
 
2. Neil Simon's 'Lost in Yonkers' (1993) -- Richard Dreyfuss, Mercedes Ruehl, Irene Worth, Brad Stoll, Mike Damus, David Strathairn, Robert Guy Miranda, Jack Laufer, Susan Merson, Illya Haase, Calvin Stillwell, Dick Hagerman, Jesse Vincent, Howard Newstate, Peter Gannon, Lori Schubeler, Jean Zarzour, Mary Scott Gudaitis. Simon's 1991 stage play won the Pulitzer Prize and four Tony Awards, including Best Play. This screen adaptation features two Tony winning members of the original cast (Ruehl and Worth), while Dreyfuss takes on the role played on stage by another Tony winner, Kevin Spacey. The storyline revolves around two young boys (Stoll, Damus) who begin living with relatives in Yonkers, N.Y., while their widowed father (Laufer) tries to recoup financial losses while working in the Deep South. The Yonkers household is dominated by the boys' no-nonsense grandmother (Worth), who runs a candy store downstairs. But it is brightened by the presence of Bella (Ruehl), their sweet but mentally challenged aunt, and the sudden appearance of their mysterious Uncle Louie (Dreyfuss).
Simon's adapted screenplay was directed by Martha Coolidge, whose previous screen efforts included "Valley Girl" (1983) and "Real Genius" (1985). 
 
Expires January 30, 2015.
 
3. Neil Simon's 'Seems Like Old Times' (1980) -- Goldie Hawn, Chevy Chase, Charles Grodin, Robert Guillaume, Harold Gould, George Grizzard, Yvonne Wilder, T.K.Carter, Judd Omen, Marc Alaimo, Bill Zucker, Jerry Houser, David Haskell, Chris Lemmon, Ed Griffith. This screwball comedy -- which reunited "Foul Play" stars Hawn and Chase -- was written for the screen by playwright Simon. Chase stars as a writer who is forced by a couple of bad hombres to rob a bank and give them the money. In desperation, he turns to his ex-wife (Hawn), a passionate public defender who happens to be married to the district attorney (Grodin). The film was the only feature directed by Emmy Award-winner Jay Sandrich, whose television credits included the series "Mary Tyler Moore," "Soap," "The Cosby Show" and "The Golden Girls."
 
Expires January 30, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for January 25, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. The Perils of Pauline (1947) -- Betty Hutton, John Lund, Billy De Wolfe, William Demarest, Constance Collier, Frank Faylen, William Farnum, Chester Conklin, Paul Panzer, "Snub" Pollard, James Finlayson, Creighton Hale, Hank Mann, Francis McDonald, Bert Roach, Heinie Conklin. Uncredited: Frank Ferguson, Max "Slapsie Maxie" Rosenbloom. Directed by George Marshall ("Destry Rides Again"), this is a fictionalized film biography of actress Pearl White (1889-1938), who became a major silent movie star before the 1920s. She starred as the title character in the popular serials about "The Perils of Pauline." Hutton stars as White and re-creates her rise from vaudeville performer to movie stardom. Lund plays Michael Farrington, the boss of a vaudeville troupe that White joins. 

 

The film features songs by Frank Loesser ("Guys and Dolls," "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying"), including "Wish I Didn't Love You So," which received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song.

 

In 1967, Pat Boone and Pamela Austin, star of numerous Dodge automobile commercials, headlined an updated version of "The Perils of Pauline." Austin played the heroine of the title.

 

Expires January 31, 2015.

 

2. The Poseidon Adventure (1972) -- Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Red Buttons, Leslie Nielsen, Carol Lynley, Roddy McDowall, Stella Stevens, Shelley Winters, Jack Albertson, Pamela Sue Martin, Arthur O'Connell, Eric Shea, Fred Sadoff, Sheila Mathews, Jan Arvan, Byron Webster, John Crawford, Bob Hastings, Erik Nelson. Disaster film producer Irwin Allen brought to the screen this suspenseful tale of an aging ocean liner upended by a tidal wave on New Year's Eve. The storyline revolves around a group of desperate survivors -- led by a take-charge minister played by Hackman -- who try to climb to safety.

 

 

Directed by Ronald Neame ("Tunes of Glory," "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie"), the film won the Academy Award for Best Original Song ("The Morning After" by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn). It became a No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hit for Maureen McGovern in August 1973. The songwriters would also win the Best Song Oscar for "We May Never Love Like This Again" from Allen's 1974 disaster film "The Towering Inferno." 

 

The disaster-at-sea film received seven other Oscar nominations: Best Supporting Actress (Winters), Best Cinematography (Harold E. Stine), Best Film Editing (Harold F. Kress), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (William J. Creber, Raphael Bretton), Best Costume Design (Paul Zastupnevich), Best Sound (Theodore Soderberg, Herman Lewis), and Best Music, Original Dramatic Score (John Williams).

 

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences also voted a Special Achievement Award to L.B. Abbott and A.D. Flowers for the visual effects they created. 

 

There have been two remakes of the film in the past decade. In 2005, a made-for-television production starred Rutger Hauer, Alexa Hamilton, Adam Baldwin, Steve Guttenberg and Bryan Brown. In 2006, German director Wolfgang Peterson helmed "Poseidon," a feature film starring Kurt Russell, Josh Lucas, Richard Dreyfuss, Emmy Rossum, Mike Vogel and Jacinda Barrett.

 

There also was a 1979 sequel of sorts -- "Beyond the Poseidon Adventure" -- that starred Sir Michael Caine, Sally Field, Telly Savalas, Karl Malden and Shirley Jones.

 

Expires January 31, 2015.

 

3. Vigilante (1983) -- Robert Forster, Fred Williamson, Richard Bright, Rutanya Alda, Don Blakely, Joseph Carberry, Willie Colon, Joe Spinell, Carol Lynley, Woody Strode, Vincent Beck, Bo Rucker, Peter Savage, Frank Pesce, Steve James, Randy Jurgenson, Henry Judd Baker, Dante Joseph, Vincent Russo, Donna Patti, Mike Miller, Hyla Marrow, Frank Gio, Ray Serra. Directed by William Lustig ("Maniac," "Maniac Cop"), this drama stars Forster as a New York City factory worker who experiences personal tragedies tied to criminals. Fed up with widespread illegal activity, he joins a mini-army of vigilantes dedicated to cleaning up the streets.

 
Expires January 31, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for January 26, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Cyrano de Bergerac (1950) -- José Ferrer, Mala Powers, William Prince, Morris Carnovsky, Ralph Clanton, Lloyd Corrigan, Virginia Farmer, Edgar Barrier, Elena Verdugo, Albert Cavens, Arthur Blake, Don Beddoe, Percy Helton, Virginia Christine, Gil Warren, Philip Van Zandt, Eric Sinclair, Richard Avonde, Paul Dubov, John Crawford, Jerry Paris. For his portrayal of playwright Edmond Rostand's famous 17th century go-between, the Puerto Rican-born Ferrer became the first Latino actor to win an Academy Award (Best Actor, 1950).

 

 

 

The romantic film was produced by Stanley Kramer, better known for his groundbreaking social dramas of the 1950s and 1960s ("The Defiant Ones," "On the Beach," "Judgment at Nuremberg," "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner"). The character of Cyrano later provided a Best Actor nomination for Gérard Depardieu, who starred in a 1990 French-language version.

 

Expires February 1, 2015.

 

 

2. Trapeze (1956) -- Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis, Gina Lollobrigida, Katy Jurado, Thomas Gomez, Johnny Puleo, Minor Watson, Gérard Landry, Jean-Pierre Kérien, Sidney James, Gamil Ratib, Pierre Tabard, Edward Hagopian, Gimma Boys, Los Arriolas. Lancaster, who was a young acrobat in the 1930s before he became an actor, revisits some old territory in this drama directed by Sir Carol Reed ("The Third Man," "Oliver!"). The actor plays Mike Ribble, a onetime great circus trapeze artist who once pulled off a rare triple somersault in the air. But an accident short-circuited his career and left him with a permanently injured leg. In Paris, he soon finds himself working with two promising trapeze artists -- an American named Tino Orsini (Curtis) and an Italian bombshell named Lola (Lollobrigida).  

 

Expires February 1, 2015. 

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TCM On Demand for January 27, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. The Earrings of Madame de... (1953) -- Charles Boyer (Général André de...) , Danielle Darrieux (Comtesse Louise de...), Vittorio De Sica (Baron Fabrizio Donati), Jean Debucourt (Monsieur Rémy), Jean Galland (Monsieur de Bernac), Mireille Perrey (Nanny), Paul Azaïs (First coachman), Hubert Noël (Henri de Maleville), Lia Di Leo (Lola). Tje German-born filmmaker Max Ophüls ("La Ronde," "House of Pleasure") directed and co-wrote the screenplay for this tale, based on the 1951 novel "Madame de" by French author Louise Lévêque de Vilmorin.

 
Darrieux stars as the title character (we never quite hear her last name), the spendthrift wife of a French general (Boyer). In an attempt to get out of debt, she sells a pair of diamond earrings given to her as a wedding present by her husband. The movie focuses on how she manages -- by chance -- to recover the earrings time after time.
 
25raff600.jpg
Darrieux
 
The film reunited Boyer and Darrieux, who starred as doomed lovers in Anatole Litvak's 1936 drama "Mayerling" -- remade 32 years later as a film vehicle for Omar Sharif and Catherine Deneuve.
 
The picture received an Academy Award nomination for Best Black-and-White Costume Design (Georges Annenkov and Rosine Delamare). 
 
 

Darrieux, who began her career in 1931, observed her 99th birthday on May 1, 2016.

 
Expires February 2, 2015.

 

 

2. The Exterminating Angel (1962) -- Silvia Pinal, Enrique Rambal, Claudio Brook, José Baviera, Augusto Benedico, Antonio Bravo, Jacqueline Andere, César del Campo, Rosa Elena Durgel, Lucy Gallardo, Enrique García Álvarez, Ofelia Guilmáin, Nadia Haro Oliva, Tito Juncom, Xavier Loyá, Francisco Avila. This film from Spanish director Luis Buñuel's Mexican period (1949-1965) tells the unforgettable story of a dinner party in Mexico City hosted by society couple Edmundo and Lucia Nobile (Rambal, Gallardo). Despite an enjoyable beginning, things begin to go downhill when the partygoers realize they cannot leave the music room of the Nobiles' estate.

 

The late film critic Roger Ebert, who included Buñuel's film in his "Great Movies" list, called it "a macabre comedy, a mordant view of human nature that suggests we harbor savage instincts and unspeakable secrets. Take a group of prosperous dinner guests and pen them up long enough, [buñuel] suggests, and they'll turn on one another like rats in an overpopulation study."

Ebert also noted the film's political symbolism, which was derived from the exiled director's anti-fascist views, which were critical of Spain's government under Generalissimo Francisco Franco.

"Obviously, the dinner guests represent the ruling class in Franco's Spain," Ebert wrote. "Having set a banquet table for themselves by defeating the workers in the Spanish Civil War, they sit down for a feast, only to find it never ends. They're trapped in their own bourgeois cul-de-sac. Increasingly resentful at being shut off from the world outside, they grow mean and restless; their worst tendencies are revealed."

 

The 2013 book "A Companion to Luis Buñuel," edited by Rob Stone and Julian Daniel Gutierrez-Albilla, mentions that Woody Allen wanted to use Buñuel in "Annie Hall" (1977) for the scene in which Alvy Singer silences a know-it-all Marshall McLuhan expert by bringing in McLuhan. Allen eventually got a chance to use Buñuel, who died in 1983, as a character in his 2011 Oscar-winning screenplay "Midnight in Paris." The movie features Owen Wilson as Gil Pender, an American tourist who somehow finds himself in the Paris of the 1920s. At a restaurant, he sits down with surrealists Buñuel (portrayed by Adrien de Van), Salvadore Dali (Adrien Brody) and Man Ray (Tom Cordier). At one point, Gil can't resist suggesting a movie idea to Buñuel:

 
Gil: A group of people attend a very formal dinner party, and at the end of dinner when they try to leave the room, they can't.
 
Buñuel: Why not?
 
Gil: They just can't seem to exit the door.
 
Buñuel: But...But why?
 
Gil: Well...when they're forced to stay together, the veneer of civilization quickly fades away. And what you're left with is who they really are -- animals.
 
Buñuel: But I don't get it. Why don't they just walk out of the room?
 
Gil: All I'm saying is just think about it. Who knows? Maybe when you're shaving one day, it'll tickle your fancy. (Walks away).
 
Buñuel: I don't understand. What's holding them in the room?
 
 

Expires February 2, 2015.

 

 

3. Irma La Douce (1963) -- Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Lou Jacobi, Bruce Yarnell, Herschel Bernardi, Hope Holiday, Joan Shawlee, Grace Lee Whitney, Paul Dubov, Howard McNear, Cliff Osmond, Diki Lerner, Herb Jones, Ruth Earl, Jane Earl. Uncredited: Louis Jourdan (narrator), James Caan. Billy Wilder's reunion with his stars of "The Apartment" (1960) earned an Academy Award for André Previn's music score. It also received nominations for Best Actress (MacLaine) and Best Color Cinematography (Joseph LaShelle). Set in Paris, the film stars Lemmon as a gendarme who gets into hot water after he causes a stir in a prostitution-related case. When he loses his job because of it, he becomes enamored with the title character, a streetwalker whose name in English means "Irma the Sweet." 

 

 
Narrator Jourdan died on February 14, 2015 at the age of 93. Actress Whitney, who appears as Kiki the Cossack, died May 1, 2015 at 85.

 

Expires February 2, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 28, 2015
 
The following feature is now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:  

 

2. The Candidate (1972) -- Robert Redford, Peter Boyle, Melvyn Douglas, Don Porter, Allen Garfield, Karen Carlson, Quinn Redeker, Morgan Upton, Michael Lerner, Kenneth Tobey, Chris Pray, Joe Miksak, Jenny Sullivan, Tom Dahlgren, Gerald Hiken. Cameos: Natalie Wood, Senator George McGovern, Mike Wallace. Jeremy Larner won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for this satire about the ups and downs of American political campaigns. Directed by Michael Ritchie ("Downhill Racer," "The Bad News Bears," "Smile," "Fletch"), the film stars Redford as Bill McKay -- an idealistic attorney and son of a former California governor (Douglas) -- who is persuaded to run as a Democrat for the U.S. Senate. In addition to his charisma and political connection, McKay is blessed with a photogenic wife (Carlson) and a savvy consultant (Boyle). But as his chances of winning increase, the candidate begins to compromise his values.
 
McKay's opponent: Republican incumbent Crocker Jarmon (Porter), who is no pushover when it comes to the hustings.
 
 
The film features an appearance by Wood -- Redford's co-star in the 1960s pictures "Inside Daisy Clover" and "This Property Is Condemned" -- who plays herself. 
 
 

Memorable scene: McKay learns about the advantages of incumbency the hard way. When a fire breaks out in Malibu, the candidate and his aides arrive at the scene to show support and discuss watershed erosion and fire disaster insurance with reporters. Moments later, Senator Jarmon arrives in a helicopter to announce he had spoken by phone to the president, who declared Malibu a national disaster area. Jarmon also reveals his intention to introduce in the Senate a watershed erosion bill with provisions for fire disaster insurance. Jarmon predicts the measure will pass because he is the chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

 

Memorable quote: McKay's final line in the movie says a lot about chasing a political goal.

 

 

Memorable dialogue: 

 

McKay: I'm still hoping to debate you.

 

Jarmon: I don't blame you a bit.

 

Seems like old times: This movie's subject matter was familiar territory for Douglas, who won Best Supporting Actor Oscars for his performances in "Hud" (1963) and "Being There" (1979). The veteran actor was married to onetime actress Helen Gahagan, who starred in the 1935 film version of "She." In the 1940s, as Helen Gahagan Douglas, she became a three-term Democratic congresswoman from California. She lost a tough 1950 Senate race to Republican congressman Richard Milhous Nixon. He labeled her as being soft on Communism. She was the first opponent to refer to him as "Tricky Dick."

 

The Candidate, Part II: Redford reportedly tried to put together a sequel featuring McKay as a Democratic president seeking re-election. The actor and political activist had hoped to produce, direct and star in an updated film with a screenplay by Larry Gelbart ("Tootsie," the TV series "M*A*S*H"). But Gelbart died of cancer in 2009 at the age of 81, and the project apparently is on hold. 

 

Expires February 3, 2015. 

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TCM On Demand for January 28, 2015
 
The following feature is now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. All the President's Men (1976) -- Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, Hal Holbrook, Jason Robards, Jane Alexander, Meredith Baxter Birney, Ned Beatty, Stephen Collins, Penny Fuller, John McMartin, Robert Walden, F. Murray Abraham, David Arkin, Henry Calvert, Dominic Chianese, Bryan E. Clark, Nicolas Coster, Lindsay Crouse, Valerie Curtin, Gene Dynarski, Nate Esformes, Ron Hale, Richard Herd, Polly Holliday, James Karen, Paul Lambert, Frank Latimore, Gene Lindsey, Anthony Mannino, Allyn Ann McLerie, James Murtaugh, Neva Patterson, Penny Peyser, George Wyner, Basil Hoffman. This real-life drama, which gives the inside scoop on The Washington Post's landmark reporting on the Watergate break-in and subsequent coverup by Richard Nixon's White House, was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director (Alan J. Pakula). The film won Oscars for Best Supporting Actor (Robards, for his portrayal of The Post's hard-nosed executive editor Ben Bradlee), Best Adapted Screenplay (William Goldman), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (George Jenkins, George Gaines) and Best Sound (Arthur Piantadosi, Les Fresholtz, Dick Alexander and James E. Webb). The movie also received nominations for Best Supporting Actress (Alexander) and Best Film Editing (Robert L. Wolfe).

 

The cinematography was by Gordon Willis, who died on May 18, 2014 at the age of 82. Despite his credits, which included "Annie Hall," "Manhattan" and all three installments of "The Godfather," he never won a competitive Academy Award. On November 14, 2009, however, Willis was presented an honorary Oscar for "unsurpassed mastery of light, shadow, color and motion." His photography for this film is noteworthy for its good vs. evil imagery. On one hand, there will be a tension-filled, night scene in a downtown garage, focusing on wrongdoing in Washington D.C. Moments later, there is a jarring shot of the brightly lit newsroom of The Post, representing the search for truth. 

 

In 2007, the American Film Institute updated its 1998 list of the 100 greatest movies of all time. This film was added to the ranking and came in at No. 77. 

 

The drama stars Redford as Bob Woodward and Hoffman as Carl Bernstein, mismatched reporters assigned to cover the Watergate case. Between the break-in on June 17, 1972 and Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974, the duo broke several significant stories that linked the White House to the ill-fated burglary attempt at the Watergate apartment complex in Washington.

 
The film begins on June 1, 1972, with Nixon at the height of his presidency as he prepares to address a joint session of Congress after his eventful trip to the Soviet Union. In the very next scene, set 16 days later, an alert security guard named Frank Wills (who appears as himself) notices tape on a door at the Watergate offices. He immediately calls the police.
 
Later that day, Woodward is assigned by The Post to cover a court proceeding involving the Watergate burglars, who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee. He tries to elicit information from a defense attorney (Coster):
 
 
As Woodward begins working on the story, he has an awkward encounter with veteran Post reporter Bernstein:
 
 
Redford, renowned for his political activism, pursued Woodward and Bernstein for the film rights to their story after he read their reporting in The Washington Post. He reportedly suggested that their non-fiction book, also titled "All the President's Men," be written in the third person in the style of a detective novel. The 1974 non-fiction book was a major best seller, as was "The Final Days," the reporters' 1976 follow up about the last stages of Nixon's presidency.
 
One of the best things about the movie is that the president and his men are not portrayed by actors, but are shown primarily through film and television footage.
 
1101760329_400.jpg
Cover Credit: STANLEY TRETICK
 
According to a March 29, 1976 Time magazine cover story on the movie, it cost Warner Bros. $450,000 to re-create the newsroom of The Washington Post on a lot in Burbank, California. Time said the set was a duplicate "right down to the wastebaskets...then they had real Washington Post trash shipped west to fill those baskets."
 
Oscar gold: Robards' Academy Award for this film was the first of two he would win for portraying a real-life figure. A year later, he received the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance as mystery writer Dashiell Hammett in "Julia." The veteran actor became one of five people -- Luise Rainer, Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn and Tom Hanks were the others -- to win back-to-back Oscars...Goldman's Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay was his second award for a Redford movie. He won the 1969 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," which made Redford a major star. 
 
 
Movie glossary:
  • Ben Bradlee -- The veteran journalist-turned-executive editor, who shepherded Woodward and Bernstein's reporting in The Post to a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, died October 21, 2014 at the age of 93. His stewardship at the newspaper -- from 1968 to 1991 -- helped it become one of the leading publications in the world.
  • CREEP -- The dubious nickname for the Committee to Re-Elect the Presidentwhich was headed by former Nixon Attorney General John Mitchell. Many of the illegal and unethical activities uncovered by Woodward and Bernstein originated there.
  • Deep Throat -- Woodward's key source, a government insider (played in the movie by Holbrook). The nickname was coined by managing editor Howard Simons (portrayed by Balsam) as a reference to the journalistic term "deep background" as well as the sensational X-rated film of the time that starred Linda Lovelace. The reporters vowed never to disclose the identity of the informant while he was alive. But in 2005, former FBI higher-up Mark Felt outed himself to Vanity Fair magazine. Woodward and Bernstein said nothing until Felt's death on December 18, 2008 at the age of 95. Only then did they confirm that he indeed was Deep Throat. The nickname also was used in television episodes of "The X-Files," in which Jerry Hardin played a government informant for FBI agent Fox Mulder (David Duchovny).
  • Katie Graham -- The Post's publisher and owner, Katharine Graham (1917-2001), is mentioned in a notorious statement to the newspaper by former Attorney General Mitchell. But she is never seen in the film. Her family owned The Post from 1933 until it was purchased for $250 million in 2013 by Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos.
  • Non-denial denial -- A White House statement designed to refute the accuracy of a newspaper story or a question, but it never actually admits that the story or question has merit.
  • Rat****ing -- Political sabotage or dirty tricks designed to undermine a political candidate.
  • Woodstein -- Joint nickname for Woodward and Bernstein within the newsroom of The Post. When Bradlee yells it at one point in the movie, he isn't happy about something they've written.
 
Memorable dialogue:
 
Deep Throat: Forget the myths the media's created about the White House. The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand.
 
Woodward: Hunt's come in from the cold. Supposedly, he's got a lawyer with $25,000 in a brown paper bag.
 
Deep Throat: Follow the money.
 
Woodward: What do you mean? Where?
 
Deep Throat: Oh, I can't tell you that.
 
Woodward: But you could tell me that.
 
Deep Throat: No, I have to do this my way. You tell me what you know, and I'll confirm. I'll keep you in the right direction if I can, but that's all. Just follow the money.
 
 
More memorable dialogue: 
 
Bradlee:  Look, McGovern's dropped to nothing, Nixon's guaranteed the renomination, The Post is stuck with a story no one else wants. It'll sink the **** paper. Everyone says, "Get off it, Ben", and I come on very sage and I say, uh, "Well, you'll see. You wait 'til this bottoms out." But the truth is, I can't figure out what we've got. (Pause). What else you working on?
 
Bernstein: Well, we're after a list of CREEP employees.
 
Bradlee: Where is it?
 
Woodward: It's classified.
 
Bradlee: How you gonna get it?
 
Woodward: We haven't had any luck yet.
 
Bradlee: Get some. 
 
 

More Woodward and Bernstein movies: The reporters have been portrayed in several other movies since 1976, either as a team or separately. In "Dick," Andrew Fleming's 1999 Watergate comedy, Woodward is played by Will Ferrell and Bernstein is former "Kids in the Hall" member Bruce McCulloch...The late Mike Nichols' 1986 comedy "Heartburn" was based on Nora Ephron's book about the breakup of her marriage to Bernstein. Meryl Streep played the character modeled after Ephron, while Jack Nicholson took on the role of the Bernstein-like celebrity reporter...In "Wired," the 1989 biopic about actor John Belushi, Woodward -- who wrote the bestselling book on which the film was based -- is portrayed by the late J.T. Walsh. 

 
Family matters: Crouse, who made her film debut as reporter Kay Eddy of The Post, is the mother of Zosia Mamet, who plays Shoshanna Shapiro on the HBO series "Girls." Crouse was married to Zosia's father, playwright David Mamet, from 1977 to 1990. The actress, who earned a 1984 Academy Award nomination for her supporting role as Sally Field's sister in "Places in the Heart," was born to be in show business. Her father was producer-playwright Russel Crouse who had a long-running Broadway partnership with Howard Lindsay. They wrote "State of the Union," the book for "The Sound of Music," and staged "Life with Father." When she was born on May 12, 1948, her full name -- Lindsay Ann Crouse -- was a tribute to her father's longtime collaborations with his partner.
 
Switching sides: In the Watergate movie, Walden appears as Donald Segretti, the Southern California attorney investigated by the Post for playing White House-inspired dirty tricks against Democratic candidates. After the film's success, the actor began starring as reporter Joe Rossi in the CBS Emmy Award-winning drama "Lou Grant." The series ran from 1977 to 1982.
 
 
Expires February 3, 2015.
 
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TCM On Demand for January 29, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Bowery at Midnight (1942) -- Bela Lugosi, John Archer, Wanda McKay, Tom Neal, Vince Barnett, Anna Hope, John Berkes, J. Farrell MacDonald, Dave O'Brien, Lucille Vance, Lew Kelly, Wheeler Oakman, Ray Miller. Uncredited: Bernard Gorcey, "Snub" Pollard. Horror film starring Lugosi as a college professor who is actually a criminal mastermind using a soup kitchen as a front for evil purposes. The film was directed by Wallace Ford ("The Corpse Vanishes"), who also directed another picture with "Bowery" in the title -- "Bowery Blitzkrieg" (1941), which starred the East Side Kids. Archer, who appears as Richard Dennison, was married to actress Marjorie Lord of TV's "The Danny Thomas Show." Their daughter Anne Archer received a 1987 Best Supporting Actress nomination for her performance in "Fatal Attraction," which starred Michael Douglas and Glenn Close.

 

Expires February 4, 2015.
 
2. The Corpse Vanishes (1942) -- Bela Lugosi, Luana Walters, Tris Coffin, Elizabeth Russell, Minerva Urecal, Angelo Rossitto, Joan Barclay, Kenneth Harlan, Gwen Kenyon, Vince Barnett, Frank Moran, George Eldredge. Horror tale in which Lugosi stars as Dr. George Lorenz, a mad scientist who goes to great lengths to keep his aging wife (Russell) vital and youthful-looking. Walters co-stars as a reporter who begins looking into the mysterious disappearances of young brides. The film was directed by Wallace Ford ("Bowery at Midnight").
 
Expires February 4, 2015.
 
3. The Fall of the House of Usher (1949) -- Gwendoline Watford, Kay Tendeter, Irving Steen, Vernon Charles, Connie Goodwin, Gavin Lee, Keith Lorraine, Lucy Pavey, Tony Powell-Bristow, Robert Wolard. This British version of the tale by Edgar Allan Poe was produced, directed and photographed by Ivan Barnett. The film is set at the Usher mansion, where a family curse has plagued the lives of a man (Tendeter) and his sister (Watford). Filmmaker Roger Corman adapted Poe's story for a 1960 horror film that starred Vincent Price. It was the first of eight Corman-Price collaborations based on Poe titles.
 
Expires February 4, 2015.
 

4. Séance on a Wet Afternoon (1964) -- Kim Stanley, Sir Richard Attenborough, Nanette Newman, Mark Eden, Patrick Magee, Gerald Sim, Marian Spencer, Lionel Gamlin, Margaret Lacey, Godfrey James, Ronald Hines, Judith Donner. Stanley earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in this British drama. She plays a fake medium who persuades her husband (Attenborough, sporting a false nose) to kidnap the young daughter (Donner) of a wealthy couple. Her plan is to cash in on her notoriety as the one person who can solve the mystery of the girl's disappearance. The film, based on a novel by Mark McShane, was written and directed by former actor Bryan Forbes ("The Stepford Wives," "Whistle Down the Wind"), who died on May 8, 2013 at the age of 86. Newman, Forbes' wife of more than 50 years, frequently appeared in his films. The movie's original score was composed by five-time Oscar winner John Barry, best known for his work on numerous James Bond films between 1962 and 1987. Be sure to notice how Barry skillfully uses his music to indicate the girl's cries during the kidnapping near her school. Attenborough, who co-produced the film, later won two Academy Awards for producing and directing the 1982 Best Picture winner "Gandhi." The screen biography, which made Sir Ben Kingsley a star, received eight Oscars in 11 nominations. 

 

This was one of five movies aired by Turner Classic Movies on Wednesday, January 27th and Thursday, January 28th as a tribute to Lord Attenborough, who died August 24, 2014 at the age of 90.

 

Expires February 4, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for January 31, 2015
 
The following feature is now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

Sweet Charity (1969) -- Shirley MacLaine, John McMartin, Ricardo Montalban, Sammy Davis, Jr., Chita Rivera, Paula Kelly, Stubby Kaye, Barbara Bouchet, Suzanne Charny, Alan Hewitt, Dante DiPaolo, Bud Vest, Ben Vereen, Lee Roy Reams, Al Lanti, John Wheeler, Leon Bing. Uncredited: Toni Basil, Linda Clifford, Chelsea Brown, Bud Cort, Maudie Prickett, Judith Lowry, Henry Beckman, Lance LeGault, Lorene Yarnell, Kristoffer Tabori. Bob Fosse's film version of his 1966 stage musical, which was inspired by Italian filmmaker Frederico Fellini's 1957 Oscar-winning drama "Nights of Cabiria." The original Broadway version, with a book by Neil Simon and songs by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields, also was directed and choreographed by Fosse, and starred his wife at the time, Gwen Verdon. 

 

Fosse also directed and choreographed this screen version, which stars MacLaine as the hard-luck but optimistic New York taxi dancer Charity Hope Valentine.

 

Among the songs used in the film are: "Big Spender" and "If My Friends Could See Me Now."

 

 

Clifford, who has a small role as a dancer in the movie, recorded a disco version of the song "If My Friends Could See Me Now." The 1978 hit was used frequently to introduce the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders before National Football League games at Texas Stadium.

 

The film received three Academy Award nominations: Best Costume Design (Edith Head), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Alexander Golitzen, George C. Webb, Jack D. Moore); and Best Music, Score of a Musical Picture -- Original or Adaptation (Coleman).

 

Expires February 6, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for February 1, 2015

 

The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Holiday from Rules? (1959) -- Directed by William H. Murray, this educational short film show how four youngsters learn to appreciate the importance of rules in society. 

 

Expires February 7, 2015.

 

 

2. Twentieth Century (1934) -- John Barrymore, Carole Lombard, Walter Connolly, Roscoe Karns, Ralph Forbes, Charles Lane (billed as Charles Levison), Etienne Girardot, Dale Fuller, Edgar Kennedy, Billie Seward. Screwball comedy directed by Howard Hawks, who returned to the genre four years later with the madcap Cary Grant-Katharine Hepburn classic "Bringing Up Baby." Barrymore plays a once-great stage producer who hopes to make a comeback by persuading his former protégée (Lombard) -- now a major Hollywood actress -- to headline his next play. His scheme goes into motion on the 20th Century Limited, the renowned train that traveled between Chicago and New York City from 1902 to 1967. The train also was a key element in Alfred Hitchcock's "North By Northwest" (1959), which starred Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason.

 


 

The screenplay for Hawks' comedy about the train and the theater was written by Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht, based on their 1932 play. MacArthur was the husband of the great American stage actress -- and two-time Oscar winner -- Helen Hayes. Their son James MacArthur (1937-2010) later co-starred with Jack Lord in TV's original "Hawaii Five-O" series.

 

In 1978, a musical version of the MacArthur-Hecht story, "On the Twentieth Century," was a hit on Broadway and starred a young Kevin Kline, who won the first of his two Tony Awards for his performance. 

 

A 2015 Broadway revival starred Kristin Chenoweth and Peter Gallagher.

 

Expires February 7, 2015.

 

 

3. Twice Upon a Time (1983) -- Voices by Lorenzo Music, Marshall Efron, James Cranna, Julie Payne, Hamilton Camp, Paul Frees, Judith Kahan. George Lucas served as the executive producer of this animated fantasy about a nefarious plot to bombard the Land of Din with nonstop nightmares.

 


 

The film was co-written and co-directed by John Korty and Charles Swenson. Korty won an Academy Award for his 1977 documentary film "Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids?" He also won an Emmy Award for directing the 1974 made-for-television movie "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman."

 

David Fincher, who directed "Fight Club" (1999), "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" (2008), "The Social Network" (2010) and "Gone Girl" (2014), provided special photographic effects for the film.

 

Expires February 7, 2015.

 

 

4. When You Grow Up (1973) -- Directed by Jerry Kurtz, this short film shows children what is expected of them when they become adults in society.

 

Expires February 7, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for February 2, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) -- Louis Wolheim, Lew Ayres, John Wray, Arnold Lucy, Ben Alexander, Scott Kolk, Owen Davis, Jr., Walter Browne, William Bakewell, Russell Gleason, Richard Alexander, Harold Goodwin, Slim Summerville, Pat Collins, Beryl Mercer, Edmund Breese, Walter E. Rogers, Arthur Gardner. This World War I drama, directed by Lewis Milestone ("Of Mice and Men," "Ocean's 11"), won the Academy Award for Best Picture of 1929-30 at the third Oscars ceremony held on November 5, 1930. Milestone also won his second Best Director award (his first win was presented for the comedy "Two Arabian Knights" at the first-ever Oscars event on May 16, 1929).

 

Based on the 1929 novel by German author Erich Maria Remarque, the drama follows the war through the viewpoint of German soldiers, many of them fresh out of school. The movie was ranked No. 54 on the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 100 greatest movies of all time. But it did not appear at all when AFI updated the list in 2007.

 

 

 

Memorable quote: "When it comes to dying for your country, it's better not to die at all! There are millions out there dying for their countries, and what good is it?" -- Paul Bäumer (Ayres), a German soldier during World War I, addressing students at his old school.

 

Memorable scene: The movie's final scene, which involves Bäumer and his attempt to catch a butterfly, is one of the most unforgettable moments in cinema history. Interestingly, Ayres' career later took a hit because of his status as a conscientious objector during World War II. But he endured, and eventually received a Best Actor nomination for his performance as a compassionate doctor in "Johnny Belinda" (1948).

 

Ben Alexander, who plays Franz Kemmerich in the war film, experienced major success on television in the 1950s. He co-starred as Frank Smith, the partner of LAPD Detective Joe Friday (Jack Webb) in the original black-and-white version of "Dragnet," which ran from 1952 to 1959. When Webb revived the series on NBC in color in 1967, Friday's partner was Bill Gannon, played by Harry Morgan.

 

"All Quiet on the Western Front" was remade for television in 1979, directed by Delbert Mann ("Marty") with a cast that included Richard Thomas, Ernest Borgnine, Donald Pleasence and Patricia Neal.

 

Expires February 8, 2015.

 

 

2. And the Oscar Goes to... (2014) -- This documentary about the history of the Academy Awards -- produced and directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, and narrated by third-generation Oscar winner Anjelica Huston -- premiered February 1, 2014 on Turner Classic Movies. At that time, Robert Osborne, the longtime TCM host, announced that the film had been dedicated to the late Tom Sherak, who served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 2009 to 2012. Sherak died January 28, 2014 at the age of 68. The documentary features highlights from previous Oscar ceremonies and includes comments from various hosts and nominees from different fields.

 

Memorable moments: Early on, there is a clip in which Academy Award winner Jon Voight faces the media while his son and daughter stand by. When a reporter asks if the younger Voights are actors, the girl smiles through her braces and responds, "Not really." But Angelina Jolie Voight dropped her surname and grew up to become an A-list, Oscar-winning actress, a director and the 2013 recipient of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her many charitable causes.

 

March-1988-Attending-Oscars-Dad-Jon-Voig

Voight at the '88 Oscars with daughter Angelina and son James Haven

 

During a segment on African-American Oscar winners, Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the third woman and first black president of the Academy, praises Hattie McDaniel's Mammy in "Gone with the Wind" (1939) as "the smartest person in the entire movie." (Note: Not sure how legions of Rhett Butler fans will react to that).

 

Be sure to stick around for the closing credits. There are gems such as the time presenter Elliott Gould announced the winner of the 1976 NCAA basketball championship game ("Indiana, 86-68," he said), as co-presenter Isabelle Adjani opened the evelope for the Best Film Editing category. And Helen Mirren recalls the impromptu ovation she received while claiming her baggage at a London airport terminal. She responded by reaching into a bag and pulling out the 2006 Best Actress Oscar she had just won for "The Queen."

 

Expires February 8, 2015.

 

 

3. The Four Feathers (1939) -- John Clements, Sir Ralph Richardson, Sir C. Aubrey Smith, June Duprez, Allan Jeayes, Jack Allen, Donald Gray, Frederick Culley, Clive Baxter, Robert Rendel, Archibald Batty, Derek Elphinstone, Hal Walters, Norman Pierce, Henry Oscar, John Laurie, Amid Taftazani. Uncredited: Alexander Knox, Leslie Phillips. Based on the 1902 novel by A.E.W. Mason, this Technicolor film was produced by Sir Alexander Korda and directed by his brother Zoltán. Set in the late 19th century, the drama follows the adventures of Harry Faversham (Clements), a former British officer who overcomes charges of cowardice during a war in the Sudan against the forces of the Mahdi.

 

period-drama-fans_184010_1.jpg?cache=134

Richardson and Clements

 

The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Color Cinematography (Georges Périnal and Osmond Borradaile).

 

The tale has been filmed several other times, most recently in a 2002 version that starred Heath Ledger, Wes Bentley, Djimon Hounsou and Kate Hudson.

 

Expires February 8, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for February 3, 2015

 

The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) -- Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins, Rose Hobart, Holmes Herbert, Halliwell Hobbes, Edgar Norton, Tempe Pigott. March earned his first of two Academy Awards for Best Actor by taking on the role of Robert Louis Stevenson's infamous scientist with a split personality. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian ("Queen Christina," "Silk Stockings"), the film was based on Stevenson's 1886 story "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde."

March shared the 1931-32 Best Actor Oscar with Wallace Beery of "The Champ." Actually, March should have been the only award winner because he had one more vote than Beery received. Under the rules at that time, Beery also was presented an Oscar. The rules were changed later.

The story has been remade several times for the screen and television, including a 1941 feature film starring Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner.

 

Expires February 9, 2015.

 

2. Grand Hotel (1932) -- Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Lionel Barrymore, Lewis Stone, Jean Hersholt, Robert McWadePurnell Pratt, Ferdinand Gottschalk, Rafaela Ottiano, Morgan Wallace, Tully Marshall, Frank Conroy, Murray Kinnell, Edwin Maxwell. Uncredited: Mary Carlisle, Allen Jenkins, Sam McDaniel. Directed by Edmund Goulding ("Dark Victory," "The Razor's Edge"), this all-star drama has the distinction of being the only film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture for its only nomination. Set at a posh hotel in Berlin, the tale is headlined by three past and future Oscar winners (Lionel Barrymore, Beery and Crawford), an honorary recipient (Garbo) and the man for whom a special statuette is named (Hersholt). Four of the cast members -- the Barrymores, Beery and Hersholt -- appeared in the 1933 comedy "Dinner at Eight."

 

The drama features a line that was long associated with the reclusive Garbo on and off the screen. It was ranked No. 30 in the American Film Institute's 2005 survey of the top 100 movie quotes of all time.

 


 

This film was remade in 1945 as the comedy/drama "Week-End at the Waldorf," set at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. It starred Ginger Rogers, Walter Pidgeon, Van Johnson and Lana Turner. 

Turner Classic Movies aired the fifth Best Picture winner in the early morning hours of February 3, 2015. It happened to be the 101st birthday of actress Carlisle, who has a small role as a honeymooner named Mrs. Hoffman.

 

Expires February 9, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for February 4, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:
 
1. Foreign Correspondent (1940) -- Joel McCrea, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Albert Basserman, Robert Benchley, Eduardo Ciannelli, Edmund Gwenn, Harry Davenport. Sir Alfred Hitchcock's first American film was "Rebecca," which won the 1940 Academy Award for Best Picture. But the British-born filmmaker also had a second Best Picture contender with this spectacular thriller that anticipated the outbreak of World War II. McCrea stars as Johnny Jones, a hard-nosed newspaper reporter for the fictional New York Globe. When the publication's editor (Davenport) decides he needs a top-notch correspondent to cover the gathering storm in Europe, he gives the job to Jones and rechristens him "Huntley Haverstock." Upon his arrival in London, Jones/Haverstock immediately becomes involved in international political intrigue that puts his life in danger.
 
Memorable scene No. 1: Gwenn, who won an Oscar for playing Santa Claus in "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), appears as Haverstock's "genial" bodyguard who tries to dispose of the foreign correspondent by pushing him from the bell tower of Westminster Cathedral. Gwenn was a Hitchcock favorite who appeared in four of the director's films between 1931 and 1955.
 
Memorable scene No. 2: An airplane carrying Haverstock and other principal characters is shot down over the Atlantic Ocean by a German destroyer. Hitchcock filmed the shooting and the resulting crash into the ocean from the point of view of the passengers.
 
 
In a 1972 interview on ABC's "The Dick Cavett Show," Hitchcock explained how the plane crash sequence was shot:
 
 
Hitch's traditional cameo: It occurs approximately 12 minutes into the film as Haverstock walks out of a hotel and encounters the Dutch diplomat Van Meer (Basserman).
 
The role of Haverstock originally was offered to actor Gary Cooper, who declined it. The actor later expressed regrets about not accepting the part. Unfortunately, McCrea, despite his solid work in this movie, never worked with Hitchcock again. Besides the Best Picture nomination, the film earned five other nods for the 13th Academy Awards held on February 27, 1941: Best Supporting Actor (Basserman, for a double role), Best Writing, Original Screenplay (Charles Bennett and Joan Harrison), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Rudolph Maté), Best Black-and-White Art Direction (Alexander Golitzen) and Best Special Effects (Paul Eagler, photographic; Thomas T. Moulton, sound). Harrison later became a producer of Hitchcock's long-running anthology series on television during the 1950s and 1960s. 
 
Expires February 10, 2015.
 
 
2. The Thin Man (1934) -- William Powell, Myrna Loy, Maureen O'Sullivan, Nat Pendleton, Minna Gombell, Porter Hall, Henry Wadsworth, William Henry, Harold Huber, Cesar Romero, Natalie Moorhead, Edward Brophy, Edward Ellis, Cyril Thornton. Having previously played the New York-based sleuth Philo Vance four times on film, Powell took on the role of Dashiell Hammett's master detective Nick Charles and gained great popularity. He co-starred with Loy (as Nora Charles) in this comedy-mystery-drama based on Hammett's 1934 novel and earned his first of three Academy Award nominations for Best Actor.
The film also received Oscar nominatons for Best Picture, Best Director (W.S. Van Dyke II) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett).
 
Although the title refers to a missing man -- inventor Clyde Wynant (played by Ellis) -- it eventually became associated with Nick Charles in the public mind. The success of this series led to five sequels -- "After the Thin Man" (1936), "Another Thin Man" (1939), "Shadow of the Thin Man" (1941), "The Thin Man Goes Home" (1945) and "Song of the Thin Man" (1947). The first four films in the series were directed by Van Dyke, who tragically died by suicide on February 5, 1943.
The movie's scene stealer is Skippy, the wire fox terrier that appears as the Charles' dog Asta. The canine also appeared in "After the Thin Man" and other films, including two starring Cary Grant -- "The Awful Truth" (1937) and "Bringing Up Baby" (1938).

A television version of the movie series starred Peter Lawford as Nick and Phyllis Kirk as Nora, and aired on NBC from 1957 to 1959. In "Murder By Death," Neil Simon's 1976 spoof of murder mysteries, David Niven and Dame Maggie Smith played the married couple Dick and Dora Charleston.

 

Memorable dialogue: 

 

Detective Guild (played by Pendleton): You got a pistol permit?

 

Nick: No.

 

Detective Guild: Ever heard of the Sullivan Act?

 

Nora (apparently confusing the Sullivan Act with the Mann Act): Oh, that's all right. We're married.

 

Memorable quote: "The murderer is right in this room, sitting at this table. You may serve the fish." -- Nick, presiding over a dinner party in which he has gathered all major suspects in a murder.
 

Expires February 10, 2015.

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TCM On Demand for February 5, 2015
 
The following features are now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 

1. The Awful Truth (1937) -- Irene Dunne, Cary Grant, Ralph Bellamy, Alexander D'Arcy, Cecil Cunningham, Molly Lamont, Esther Dale, Joyce Compton, Robert Allen, Robert Warwick, Mary Forbes. Leo McCarey won the first of his two Best Director Oscars -- the other was for "Going My Way" (1944) -- via this screwball comedy about a divorcing couple (Dunne and Grant) that somehow can't refrain from meddling in each other's new romances. Based on a 1922 play by Arthur Richman, the film also received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Actress (Dunne), Best Supporting Actor (Bellamy) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Viña Delmar).
 
 
Dunne and Grant would reunite for two other films -- "My Favorite Wife" (1940) and "Penny Serenade" (1941). Mr. Smith, the wire-haired terrier in the film, was the same dog that appeared as Asta in "The Thin Man" (1934) and "After the Thin Man" (1936).
 
Expires February 11, 2015.

 

 

2. Grand Illusion (1937) -- Jean Gabin, Dita Parlo, Pierre Fresnay, Erich von Stroheim, Maurice Dalio, Julien Carette, Georges Péclet, Werner Florian, Jean Dasté, Sylvain Itkine, Gaston Modot. France's Jean Renoir directed and co-wrote (with Charles Spaak) this World War I drama, which received an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture of 1938. It has been called one of the greatest movies of all time. The film stars Gabin and Fresnay as French pilots who are shot down and confined to a German prisoner-of-war camp. They are later moved to a supposedly inescapable fortress, but we all know that you can't keep determined POWs down! Austrian-born film director and actor Von Stroheim ("Greed") co-stars as a gentlemanly German officer who believes in the old ways of conducting war.

 
In a 1999 review of the film, the late Roger Ebert credited the movie -- titled "La Grande Illusion" in French -- for influencing both the tunnel-digging sequences in "The Great Escape" (1963) and the patriotic singing of "La Marseillaise" in "Casablanca" (1943). "It's not a movie about a prison escape, nor is it jingoistic in its politics; it's a meditation on the collapse of the old order of European civilization, " Ebert wrote. "Perhaps that was always a sentimental upper-class illusion, the notion that gentlemen on both sides of the lines subscribed to the same code of behavior. Whatever it was, it died in the trenches of World War I."
 

 

Ebert, who included the film on his list of "Great Movies," also details the miraculous survival of Renoir's film during World War II, despite the odds:

 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-grand-illusion-1937

 

Dalio, who starred with Modot in Renoir's other great film of the pre-World War II decade -- "Rules of the Game" (1939) -- plays a French POW who happens to be a member of a wealthy Jewish family. Parlo (1906-1971), a German actress who occasionally appeared in French and American movies (see: "L'Atalante"), became an inspiration for Madonna in 1992. The pop singer created a character she called "Mistress Dita" and used it in her racy album "Erotica" (and the title song's music video), as well as her controversial and explicit photo-book "Sex."

 

Expires February 11, 2015.

 

 

3. The Last of the Mohicans (1936) -- Randolph Scott, Binnie Barnes, Henry Wilcoxon, Bruce Cabot, Heather Angel, Phillip Reed, Robert Barrat, Hugh Buckler, Willard Robertson, William Stack, Lumsden Hare, Frank McGlynn, Sr., Will Stanton, William V. Mong, Art Dupuis, Ian MacLaren, Reginald Barlow, Olaf Hytten, Lionel Belmore, Claude King. Scott stars as James Fenimore Cooper's Hawkeye in this adaptation of the second installment of the 19th-century author's five-part "Leatherstocking Tales." Set in 1757 during the French and Indian War, the drama focuses on Hawkeye's attempt to reunite sisters Alice and Cora Munro (Barnes, Angel) with their father (Buckler), the British commander of Fort William Henry. To make that happen, the heroic frontiersman -- and adopted Mohican-- must fend off the advances of Huron tribe members allied with the French.

The film was directed by George B. Seitz, who helmed 13 of the films in the "Andy Hardy" series that starred Mickey Rooney. The picture received an Academy Award nomination for Best Assistant Director (Clem Beauchamp), a category that was awarded from 1933 to 1937. Beauchamp shared the 1935 award with Paul Wing for "The Lives of a Bengal Lancer."

 

Michael Mann's 1992 remake of the Hawkeye adventure starred Daniel Day-Lewis as the hero and actresses Madeleine Stowe and Jodhi May as the Munro sisters. The updated screen version of the tale received the Academy Award for Best Sound (Chris Jenkins, Doug Hemphill, Mark Smith and Simon Kaye).

 

Expires February 11, 2015.

 

 

4. The Pride of the Yankees (1942) -- Gary Cooper, Teresa Wright, Walter Brennan, Babe Ruth, Dan Duryea, Elsa Janssen, Ludwig Stössel, Virginia Gilmore, Bill Dickey, Ernie Adams, Pierre Watkin, Harry Harvey, Bob Meusel, Mark Koenig, Bill Stern. Uncredited actors: Dane Clark, Frank Faylen, James Westerfield. Directed by Sam Wood and produced by Samuel Goldwyn, this film biography is about the great career and tragic end of New York Yankees great Lou Gehrig (1903-1941). The drama earned 11 Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Cooper) and Best Actress (Wright). The movie's only Oscar win was for Best Film Editing (Daniel Mandell). Wright, who co-stars as Gehrig's steadfast wife Eleanor, also was nominated for Best Supporting Actress and won for her performance in the 1942 Best Picture winner "Mrs. Miniver." Wood received a nomination for Best Director, but it was for another film, "Kings Row."

 
Gary+Cooper+in+Pride+of+the+Yankees.PNG
Cooper as Lou Gehrig
 
The biopic's screenplay was co-written by Jo Swerling, Sr. and Herman J. Mankiewicz (Ben's grandfather), based on an original story by sportswriting great Paul Gallico. Mankiewicz, who shared a 1941 screenwriting Oscar with Orson Welles for "Citizen Kane," later wrote the screenplay for "The Pride of St. Louis" (1952), which starred Dan Dailey as Hall of Fame pitcher Dizzy Dean.

 

Gehrig, who was elected to baseball's Hall of Fame in 1939, joined the Yankees in 1923 and played 17 seasons with the ballclub. He was a member of six World Series championship teams, had a .340 career batting average, slugged 493 home runs and drove in 1,995 runs. From 1925 to 1939, he appeared in a record 2,130 consecutive games. The mark was surpassed during the 1995 Major League Baseball season by Cal Ripken, Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles.

 
Gehrig's career tragically was short circuited when he contracted amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a terminal disease marked by the gradual degeneration of the nerve cells in the central nervous system. It has since become known as "Lou Gehrig's Disease."
 
"The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth": The film re-creates Gehrig's unforgettable farewell address at Yankee Stadium on July 4, 1939. The most famous line from the speech was ranked No. 38 on the American Film Institute's 2005 list of the 100 greatest movie quotes of all time.
 
Frequent collaborators: Cooper and Brennan appeared together in five other films: "The Cowboy and the Lady" (1938), "The Westerner" (1940), "Meet John Doe" (1941), "Sergeant York" (1941) and "Task Force" (1949).
 
They wore the pinstripes, too: Several of Gehrig's Yankees teammates appear as themselves, including Ruth, who preceded "The Iron Horse" in the team's batting order for many seasons.
 
The Oscars and sports: This was one of the rare sports stories to be nominated for Best Picture. Among the others: "Rocky" (which won the top Academy Award for 1976) and "Chariots of Fire" (the 1981 Best Picture winner). The most recent baseball movie to receive a Best Picture nomination was "Moneyball" (2011), which starred Brad Pitt.
 
Expires February 11, 2015.
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TCM On Demand for February 6, 2015

 

The following feature is now available on TCM On Demand for a limited time:

 


3. Frank Capra's 'You Can't Take It With You' (1938) -- James Stewart, Jean Arthur, Lionel Barrymore, Edward Arnold,  Misha Auer, Ann Miller, Spring Byington, Samuel S. Hinds, H.B. Warner, Donald Meeks, Halliwell Hobbes, Dub Taylor, Mary Forbes, Lillian Yarbo, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, Clarence Wilson, Josef Swickard, Ann Doran, Christian Rub, Bodil Rosing, Charles Lane, Harry Davenport. Uncredited: Ward Bond, Byron Foulger, Ian Wolfe, Eugene Anderson, Jr., Stanley Andrews, Irving Bacon, Pert Kelton, Pierre Watkin. Capra won his third Academy Award for Best Director in five years with this Best Picture-winning screwball comedy. His other awards were for "It Happened One Night" (1934) and "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936).

 


 

Expires February 12, 2015.


 

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