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Mickey Rooney has passed away at 93


speedracer5
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Sad news out of Hollywood:

 

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/mickey-rooney-golden-age-box-office-giant-dies-at-93-1201153308/

 

While I can't count myself a fan of Mickey Rooney, I can appreciate his contribution to cinema.  He was also one of the few remaining stars from both the silent era and the golden age of movies. 

 

RIP Mickey.

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I think my favorite performances from him are the films he did with Judy Garland (who I enjoy).  My least favorite is probably his appearance in "Breakfast at Tiffanys."  I just cannot believe that nobody saw anything wrong with how offensive his portrayal of Mr. Yunioshi was, or maybe I'm just giving 1961 too much credit? I know during WWII, the Japanese were portrayed negatively and sterotypically as a means of propaganda for the American audiences.  By 1961, I imagine that this type of portrayal was unnecessary?

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Carl Reiner, who's worked with some major talents -- Sid Caesar, Dick Van ****, Mel Brooks -- called Rooney the most talented person he ever worked with.

 

FWIW I'm not offended by Rooney's Mr. Yunioshi. I just think it's a bad performance.

 

*Whoa, Dick Van D-y-k-e is censored? How about if I just call him Dick V.D.?

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speedracer5, 1961 America was still segregated.  Property titles could still exclude all sorts of racial and ethnic groups.  It was still before most the the Civil Rights movement.  So, yeah, don't give it much credit.  Not only is Mr. Rooney's role in Tiffany's offensive for it's stereotyping, it is also a bad performance.  And wretched make-up.

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What I admired about Rooney is that he earned Academy Award nominations as a teen (Best Actor for "Babes in Arms"), when he was in his 20s (Best Actor for "The Human Comedy'), when he was in his late 30s (Best Supporting Actor for "The Bold and the Brave") and when he was almost 60 (Best Supporting for "The Black Stallion"). Now that's staying power!

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I always wished he would do an interview with Mr. Osborne

 

He did a "Private Screenings" interview with Osborne in 1997, and almost frightened the TCM host to death while recounting a particularly heated argument with an abusive director. As Ben Mankiewicz says in the special "TCM Twenty Classic Moments" (now on TCM On Demand): "Robert would later confess that he was genuinely afraid Mickey might hit him."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biof6HYrjZU

Edited by jakeem
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So sorry to hear of Mickey Rooney's passing.  He was an amazing talent.  I hope his tribute will include "The Human Comedy".  

 

Think about it, Mickey's career spanned very close to a century!  RIP.

A truly unique talent. He was the last performer remaining who had major roles in films of the first half of the '30s.

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Doesn't anyone pay attention?  You don't have to hyphenate between the letters of certain words to get them past the autocensor.  Just space 'em!

 

For all the fun people liked to poke about Mickey Rooney, his death is certainly the end of an era.  There are scant survivors  now from those "golden age" days that still remain in the public eye.  How many of us have read the notices of death or heard about some old time actor dying and thought, "Jeez...I thought he was ALREADY dead!"?  Mickey would always manage to pop up somewhere.  Whether on a talk show, an audience shot, life insurance TV commercial or whatever, he wasn't out of sight for long.

 

Acting, singing, dancing, even playing the drums, Rooney had more talent than one could fit in a body his size.  There have been thousands and thousands of people whose entire lives were much shorter than Mickey's career, and they still lived long, long lives.

 

I always loved him.  God bless him, he had one hell of a run.  The world will never see the likes of ANYone like him for a long, long time, if ever.

 

Sepiatone 

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Doesn't anyone pay attention?  You don't have to hyphenate between the letters of certain words to get them past the autocensor.  Just space 'em!

 

For all the fun people liked to poke about Mickey Rooney, his death is certainly the end of an era.  There are scant survivors  now from those "golden age" days that still remain in the public eye.  How many of us have read the notices of death or heard about some old time actor dying and thought, "Jeez...I thought he was ALREADY dead!"?  Mickey would always manage to pop up somewhere.  Whether on a talk show, an audience shot, life insurance TV commercial or whatever, he wasn't out of sight for long.

 

Acting, singing, dancing, even playing the drums, Rooney had more talent than one could fit in a body his size.  There have been thousands and thousands of people whose entire lives were much shorter than Mickey's career, and they still lived long, long lives.

 

I always loved him.  God bless him, he had one hell of a run.  The world will never see the likes of ANYone like him for a long, long time, if ever.

 

Sepiatone 

Do you think most younger people have heard of Mickey Rooney?

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@ finance;   It depends on the age of the "younger person".  I doubt my grandnieces and nephews have heard of him.  But their parents, in their late 20's and early 30's know who he was, mainly due to their seeing THE BLACK STALLION as tykes.

 

Sepiatone

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Do you think most younger people have heard of Mickey Rooney?

 

Let's not forget his appearance in A Night At The Museum.  Not everyone may understand his full contribution to the industry, but I imagine most have seen him in at least one film, even if it was just ANATM.

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I agree Holden.  That makes the most sense.

April 13th would be a great day to fill up with Mickey Rooney movies, since all the good movies scheduled for that day have already been shown a thousand times.  This way a Rooney tribute will do the least damage.

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Sad but not surprised about his passing.  We were just discussing about this topic a month ago on the boards.  I last saw Mickey on the last showing of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno".  He looked in pretty good spirits and I thought he had at least a few more years with us.   :(

 

 

RIP

 

 

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Ahhh man, this is a total bummer. I really wanted Mickey Rooney to reach 100, 95 at least. But on the bright side, the man lived a tremendous life & knew & worked with the best of his time. I am happy that we had him on this planet for as long as we did. I forsee a TCM Marathon honoring this true legend in his own time. You will be missed, R.I.P.D. (Jeff Bridges refference)

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