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George Brent's Derry Air


MorrisSteele
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I could have more than one name. Maybe I'll switched to Float Like

a Butterfly or Sting Like a Bee. George is A okay in my book.

 

 

I'll share the load part of the week. George is a heavyweight. Speaking of heavyweights i see Christie is in the news again.....

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I'll share the load part of the week. George is a heavyweight. Speaking of heavyweights i see Christie is in the news again.....

Thanks. There appear to be conflicting reports whether Christie was cleared by the

federal investigation or not. He better hope for the best, because there's not much

money to be made as a William Howard Taft impersonator.

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  • 2 weeks later...

George Brent - Ireland's Gift to Hollywood and its Leading Ladies (BearManor 2014) is now available from the publisher or Amazon.  There are no derriere shots of George, but I did unravel his participation in the IRA (1921) and delve into his rather prolific theatrical career during the 1920's (and his nose job after his summer theater stint at Denver's Elitch Gardens).  My profile shows photo of the cover.

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George Brent - Ireland's Gift to Hollywood and its Leading Ladies (BearManor 2014) is now available from the publisher or Amazon.  There are no derriere shots of George, but I did unravel his participation in the IRA (1921) and delve into his rather prolific theatrical career during the 1920's (and his nose job after his summer theater stint at Denver's Elitch Gardens).  My profile shows photo of the cover.

You are the author? So his rear end must be "old hat" to you.

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George Brent - Ireland's Gift to Hollywood and its Leading Ladies (BearManor 2014) is now available from the publisher or Amazon.  There are no derriere shots of George, but I did unravel his participation in the IRA (1921) and delve into his rather prolific theatrical career during the 1920's (and his nose job after his summer theater stint at Denver's Elitch Gardens).  My profile shows photo of the cover.

 

So does the book make the point that Brent was a gift to leading ladies like Bette Davis because he was fairly low key and wouldn't up stage them?

 

Also,  the profile picture is the same one Hibi has been using at here for a long time.    I guess it is a common photo of our man Brent.

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So does the book make the point that Brent was a gift to leading ladies like Bette Davis because he was fairly low key and wouldn't up stage them?

 

Also,  the profile picture is the same one Hibi has been using at here for a long time.    I guess it is a common photo of our man Brent.

You hit the nail on the head as far as Brent not upstaging his luminous co-stars.  I was considering several photos of Our Man Brentie (Davis' term of endearment for George) for the cover, before deciding.   It stood out somehow.  Hibi has the best of taste. 

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You hit the nail on the head as far as Brent not upstaging his luminous co-stars.  I was considering several photos of Our Man Brentie (Davis' term of endearment for George) for the cover, before deciding.   It stood out somehow.  Hibi has the best of taste. 

 

 

LOL. Thank you! I cant wait to read the book. I hadnt realized it was coming out so soon. Will you be interviewed again on the other boards (I cant remember their name off the bat)

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I've always been interested in Georgie's involvement in the IRA. When it is

mentioned, it's not in much detail as to exactly what his role was, and it's

understandable that he didn't want to talk about it much in his movie star

days. And few movie stars that I know of were ever part of what many would

consider a terrorist organization.

 

I think one of the first times I remember Brent mentioned was in a book where

it was said that Bette liked to have GB in a movie with her because she could

just walk all over him, if in a friendly way. I guess that reputation has stuck.

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LOL. Thank you! I cant wait to read the book. I hadnt realized it was coming out so soon. Will you be interviewed again on the other boards (I cant remember their name off the bat)

Hibi - I'll keep you posted as to any upcoming interviews (the book was released today).  Movie Morlocks and Silver Screen Oasis have offered visits in the past and I really enjoyed the "chatty" and informative atmosphere of these boards.  :)

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I've always been interested in Georgie's involvement in the IRA. When it is

mentioned, it's not in much detail as to exactly what his role was, and it's

understandable that he didn't want to talk about it much in his movie star

days. And few movie stars that I know of were ever part of what many would

consider a terrorist organization.

 

I think one of the first times I remember Brent mentioned was in a book where

it was said that Bette liked to have GB in a movie with her because she could

just walk all over him, if in a friendly way. I guess that reputation has stuck.

MorrisSteele - I had the help of Irish filmmaker Brian Reddin in my pursuit of Brent's early life in Ballinasloe and Clonfad, Ireland.  Reddin was also helpful in guiding my research of young George Nolan (his real name) and his participation as a dispatch carrier for Michael Collins.  This all took place during the months of February-June 1921 (George was 17).  He ran away from home for excitement and adventure .... he got it! 

 

While Davis admitted that Brent had more charisma off-screen, she felt indebted to him for helping her through Dark Victory and she thought him "superb" and that he made the film "a far better one than it would have been without him." (from her 1987 This N' That).  My personal favorite is his dissapated ex-pat in The Rains Came.

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I've always been interested in Georgie's involvement in the IRA. When it is

mentioned, it's not in much detail as to exactly what his role was, and it's

understandable that he didn't want to talk about it much in his movie star

days. And few movie stars that I know of were ever part of what many would

consider a terrorist organization.

 

I think one of the first times I remember Brent mentioned was in a book where

it was said that Bette liked to have GB in a movie with her because she could

just walk all over him, if in a friendly way. I guess that reputation has stuck.

I assume that everyone on the set, including the director, co-actors, and crew, found Brent to be very easy to get along with.

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Hibi - I'll keep you posted as to any upcoming interviews (the book was released today).  Movie Morlocks and Silver Screen Oasis have offered visits in the past and I really enjoyed the "chatty" and informative atmosphere of these boards.  :)

 

 

Great. Thank you. I'd appreciate that. I'd forgotten the name of Silver Screen Oasis (It came to me later. LOL)

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I assume that everyone on the set, including the director, co-actors, and crew, found Brent to be very easy to get along with.

Brent didn't get along with director Michael Curtiz, but Curtiz' stepson (a script clerk on Gold Is Where You Find It) noted what a "calm easy-going guy" George was.  Marcia Mae Jones (Mountain Justice) commented on Brent's "charm" and "sense of humor." Brent could barely tolerate working with Hedy Lamarr (Experiment Perilous)--finding her "exasperating", saying "her memory for remembering lines or set-ups was god-awful."  Personally, I think its one of her best performances.   

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Brent didn't get along with director Michael Curtiz, but Curtiz' stepson (a script clerk on Gold Is Where You Find It) noted what a "calm easy-going guy" George was.  Marcia Mae Jones (Mountain Justice) commented on Brent's "charm" and "sense of humor." Brent could barely tolerate working with Hedy Lamarr (Experiment Perilous)--finding her "exasperating", saying "her memory for remembering lines or set-ups was god-awful."  Personally, I think its one of her best performances.   

Hedy had a bad memory? She was touted as being a genius for her technical work which produced a patent on a key device.

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Hedy had a bad memory? She was touted as being a genius for her technical work which produced a patent on a key device.

Yep, I make mention of her invention for frequency hopping.  Could be that a scientific mind is less inclined for memorizing movie dialogue. 

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Yep, I make mention of her invention for frequency hopping.  Could be that a scientific mind is less inclined for memorizing movie dialogue. 

 

Does the book go into why Brent's marriage to Ann Sheridan only lasted one year? 

 

I heard it was because she didn't buy large enough chairs for him to sit in.   But maybe that isn't true!  :D

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Does the book go into why Brent's marriage to Ann Sheridan only lasted one year? 

 

I heard it was because she didn't buy large enough chairs for him to sit in.   But maybe that isn't true!  :D

The Brent-Sheridan relationship is explored in detail in a chapter titled "A Littel More Oomph."  They began dating in late fall of 1939 -- I get the impression they knew what they were in for before they tied the knot.  Following their Florida marriage, they separated after eight months.  As Bennett Cerf said of his marriage to Sylvia Sidney, "You should never legalize a 'hot' romance." 

 

You could be spot on about Annie not having a big enough chair ... perhaps that's why she taught George how to rumba ... in hopes that his tush could fit on her cush-ion. :P

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MorrisSteele - I had the help of Irish filmmaker Brian Reddin in my pursuit of Brent's early life in Ballinasloe and Clonfad, Ireland.  Reddin was also helpful in guiding my research of young George Nolan (his real name) and his participation as a dispatch carrier for Michael Collins.  This all took place during the months of February-June 1921 (George was 17).  He ran away from home for excitement and adventure .... he got it! 

 

While Davis admitted that Brent had more charisma off-screen, she felt indebted to him for helping her through Dark Victory and she thought him "superb" and that he made the film "a far better one than it would have been without him." (from her 1987 This N' That).  My personal favorite is his dissapated ex-pat in The Rains Came.

Yes, I'd imagine it took some digging to get all the details from that long ago. Wiki mentions that the

British put a bounty on George's head, wonder if that is true. Most sources give his birth year as

1899, so he would have been in his early twenties in 1921. Did he change his date for some purpose?

That wouldn't be unusual for a movie star, though they usually subtracted instead of adding. And he

sure did get adventure, maybe more than he bargained for.

 

I suppose George's reputation as someone who played second fiddle to his leading ladies is

exaggerated and once these things start, they're hard to contain. I usually don't read many

movie star biographies, but this one sounds interesting. Good luck with the book.

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