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Naked City Tonight


StBartsActor
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I watched, maybe the last 40 minutes of the film, but have never seen  the film. It is a hardly recognizable viewing of the lower East Side of NYC today. I thought it was a good film, especially that last scene, incredible film making of Jules Dassin, who gets the view of the train, the water, the height of the bridge and the actors, all equally important in the frame. And then there is that last scene of the view of Times Square and the words "there are 8 million stories in the Naked City"....... It's playing at the Festival, and it has convinced me to watch on the large screen. Fun and the Presenter very well spoken.

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I watched, maybe the last 40 minutes of the film, but have never seen  the film. It is a hardly recognizable viewing of the lower East Side of NYC today. I thought it was a good film, especially that last scene, incredible film making of Jules Dassin, who gets the view of the train, the water, the height of the bridge and the actors, all equally important in the frame. And then there is that last scene of the view of Times Square and the words "there are 8 million stories in the Naked City"....... It's playing at the Festival, and it has convinced me to watch on the large screen. Fun and the Presenter very well spoken.

 

The young woman who introduced the film is the winner of the Ultimate Fan Contest and will also present the film at the Film Festival later this week!

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i was going to watch this flick when it recently aired, but since my local public library posseses this dvd (and thankfully a whole slew of other wonderful 1930's-1950's 'noirs', i'll view it at my leisure.

 

I watched, maybe the last 40 minutes of the film, but have never seen  the film. It is a hardly recognizable viewing of the lower East Side of NYC today. I thought it was a good film, especially that last scene, incredible film making of Jules Dassin, who gets the view of the train, the water, the height of the bridge and the actors, all equally important in the frame. And then there is that last scene of the view of Times Square and the words "there are 8 million stories in the Naked City"....

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i was going to watch this flick when it recently aired, but since my local public library posseses this dvd (and thankfully a whole slew of other wonderful 1930's-1950's 'noirs', i'll view it at my leisure.

I find it morbid that the producer and narrator, Mark Hellinger, died before or soon after the film's release.

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I really enjoy "The Naked City" for being an entertaining film.  The one aspect which really intrigues me which I really doubt a film director or actors would want to try today is actually filming a movie on location amidst a crowd of onlookers without the onlookers knowing they are filming a movie.  Many a time when the actors were filming the chase scene in 1950s New York you could see onlookers crowding the actors wondering what was going on as the actors delivered their lines or were running after the bad guy.  

 

Another movie which filmed scenes in this manner was the 1950 film "D.O.A." which was filmed in San Francisco.  When Edmond O'Brien is running down the streets of San Francisco you can see a few pedestrians looking and wondering what this guy has done and who is he running from? 

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I saw it for the first time when TCM aired it last week. It certainly is an interesting movie - quirky even - that spoken narration (apparently written/spoken by the producer, Mark Hellinger) which to me wavers between appropriate to offputtingly comic and intrusive. Watching the film, I came to believe the narration was an afterthought to assure that audiences could more easily follow the action, although I think it would have been fine without it, and a better movie. It was interesting seeing Barry Fitzgerald in a different role and Howard Duff as a weasley loser.

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I also enjoy the movie and that you see the streets of New York at a time when it was not so congested. If you look carefully, you may notice a couple of up-and-coming character actors. The scene in the subway in which the young woman ask "You heard about that woman in the bathtub?" That woman was Kathleen Freeman, who went on to a successful career playing busybody neighbors, battle ax landladies, and in a couple cases, a mother-in-law or nurse. Her final performance was on stage (The Full Monty) in which she performed up until 2 days prior to her passing in 2001 (lung cancer).


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I saw it for the first time when TCM aired it last week. It certainly is an interesting movie - quirky even - that spoken narration (apparently written/spoken by the producer, Mark Hellinger) which to me wavers between appropriate to offputtingly comic and intrusive. Watching the film, I came to believe the narration was an afterthought to assure that audiences could more easily follow the action, although I think it would have been fine without it, and a better movie. It was interesting seeing Barry Fitzgerald in a different role and Howard Duff as a weasley loser.

Hellinger's narration couldn't have been that much of an afterthought, because, although I'm not sure of the exact time frame, I believe he died soon after the film was shot. 

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