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Is political correctness getting in the way of classic broadcasts?


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There have been on-going discussions about SONG OF THE SOUTH, and surely that is a related component to this new topic. But I don't necessarily want to drone on about the Disney favorite, denied broadcasts, because I feel there are other films getting just as bad a reputation from modern scholars and cable TV hosts.

 

On TCM's recent Friday Night Spotlight, airing throughout January 2015, we have seen guest host Ken Levine begging the audience's pardon left and right for any un-PC material that may be appearing in Neil Simon's films. 

 

I have watched him apologize for MURDER BY DEATH, a silly piece of 70s parody cinema that in no way means to malign or harm specific groups of people (part of the humor comes from spoofing all kinds of people and situations).  Also, in his closing remarks for THE OUT OF TOWNERS, a week earlier, he said something, and I paraphrase-- 'I don't know about you, but that ending where the plane is hijacked was looked at by audiences in 1970 with much different eyes than we do now after 9-11.' The implication being that Simon's humor is in bad taste by modern standards.

 

Is it really necessary for a host to make a verbal disclaimer about a film before or after it is shown on TCM...?

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What if all filmmakers today worried about how inappropriate or un-correct their films might be perceived ten, twenty or thirty years from now? Wouldn't that automatically stifle the creative process in Hollywood? Wasn't all the recent controversy about THE INTERVIEW a clarion call to action that we mustn't let censorship control the movie-making process in America?  

 

So then why are we allowing political correctness to affect our views on what is just sheer entertainment? Why must today's film buffs find potentially offensive messages in everything that Hollywood ever made? Aren't we going too far with this kind of restrictive analysis of classic film?

 

Thoughts...?

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What if all filmmakers today worried about how inappropriate or un-correct their films might be perceived ten, twenty or thirty years from now? Wouldn't that automatically stifle the creative process in Hollywood? Wasn't all the recent controversy about THE INTERVIEW a clarion call to action that we mustn't let censorship control the movie-making process in America?  

 

So then why are we allowing political correctness to affect our views on what is just sheer entertainment? Why must today's film buffs find potentially offensive messages in everything that Hollywood ever made? Aren't we going too far with this kind of restrictive analysis of classic film?

 

Thoughts...?

because today's hollywood people, the film critics and reviewers, know that the film fare of past decades is immensely superior to today's PC slop and alotta them simply don't wanna have any discussion about it...

certainly they're not gonna initiate any discussion by questioning political correctness. :)

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What if all filmmakers today worried about how inappropriate or un-correct their films might be perceived ten, twenty or thirty years from now? Wouldn't that automatically stifle the creative process in Hollywood? Wasn't all the recent controversy about THE INTERVIEW a clarion call to action that we mustn't let censorship control the movie-making process in America?  

 

So then why are we allowing political correctness to affect our views on what is just sheer entertainment? Why must today's film buffs find potentially offensive messages in everything that Hollywood ever made? Aren't we going too far with this kind of restrictive analysis of classic film?

 

Thoughts...?

 

I really don't think filmmakers (today or yesterday), worry about if, in the future,  some content will be viewed as inappropriate.   I just don't see that stifling their creative process.    Like we saw in France people feel very strongly that allowing a 'free' creative process trumps the feeling of thin-skinned individuals or groups.

 

As for your question about host making pre or post comments related to content:  I don't view it as 'necessary' or 'not necessary'.  Instead it is up to how the host feels about it.   When done correctly it is just providing insight to the viewer.  e.g.  "when the movie was released group XYZ held protest about ABC'.     But the host should be careful not to provide a slanted POV;  i.e.  taking a side on it, one way or the other.

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There have been on-going discussions about SONG OF THE SOUTH, and surely that is a related component to this new topic. But I don't necessarily want to drone on about the Disney favorite, denied broadcasts, because I feel there are other films that getting just as bad a reputation from modern scholars and cable TV hosts.

 

On TCM's recent Friday Night Spotlight, airing throughout January 2015, we have seen guest host Ken Levine begging the audience's pardon left and right for any un-PC material that may be appearing in Neil Simon's films. 

 

I have watched him apologize for MURDER BY DEATH, a silly piece of 70s parody cinema that in no way means to malign or harm specific groups of people (part of the humor comes from spoofing all kinds of people and situations).  Also, in his closing remarks for THE OUT OF TOWNERS, a week earlier, he said something, and I paraphrase-- 'I don't know about you, but that ending where the plane is hijacked was looked at by audiences in 1970 with much different eyes than we do now after 9-11.' The implication being that Simon's humor is in bad taste by modern standards.

 

Is it really necessary for a host to make a verbal disclaimer about a film before or after it is shown on TCM...?

 

Political correct nonsense has even infiltrated animation (really a ninja Edith?) , this is what made me attracted to the Russian made "Masha and The Bear".  Masha's design and mannerism is NOT politically correct by the U.S uptight standards. Brought a smile to my face.

 

r969846_10504272.jpg

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I really don't think filmmakers (today or yesterday), worry about if, in the future,  some content will be viewed as inappropriate.   I just don't see that stifling their creative process.    Like we saw in France people feel very strongly that allowing a 'free' creative process trumps the feeling of thin-skinned individuals or groups.

 

As for your question about host making pre or post comments related to content:  I don't view it as 'necessary' or 'not necessary'.  Instead it is up to how the host feels about it.   When done correctly it is just providing insight to the viewer.  e.g.  "when the movie was released group XYZ held protest about ABC'.     But the host should be careful not to provide a slanted POV;  i.e.  taking a side on it, one way or the other.

Good point(s). Maybe it doesn't cross their minds-- until years later, if they are still around, and new audiences are ripping their work apart and finding fault with it. If someone like that is still working in the industry (long-time directors such as Eastwood or Allen) they may consciously try to make their later films a bit more knowingly, but I cannot help but feel that still inhibits the creative process to some extent.

 

Regarding the pre- and post-film wraparounds by the hosts-- I am in the middle on that. For example, I feel Ken Levine is very personable on camera and obviously quite knowledgeable, but I still don't think he needs to be explaining away the sins of past movie-making. When he did that before MURDER BY DEATH (and keep in mind I had seen it before on TCM with a different host wraparound), it threw my whole viewing experience off. I was not able to laugh in scenes where Neil Simon and his actors wanted me to laugh-- because I had been redirected to watch the movie with these modern sensibilities about inappropriate humor and entertainment.

 

Or when I did muster up a chuckle or two, because something even if it was slightly offensive was very funny, I was now made to feel guilty for enjoying it. I don't think the wraparounds should put us on edge that way. Just my two cents here, folks.

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political correctness to me has always meant undue hypersensitivity.

 

Question: have rural white southerners ever taken offense to The Beverly Hillbillies?

no, of course not! they understand that it is all meant in fun. that it is humor and not meant to be taken seriously.

 

to some though it makes more sense to go though life with an invisible chip on their shoulders just itchin' to take offense at something.

 

30li8m8.jpg

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political correctness to me has always meant undue hypersensitivity.

 

Question: have rural white southerners ever taken offense to The Beverly Hillbillies?

no, of course not! they understand that it is all meant in fun. that it is humor and not meant to be taken seriously.

 

to some though it makes more sense to go though life with an invisible chip on their shoulders just itchin' to take offense at something.

 

 

 

While traveling to the south on business I have meet a few white southerners that didn't like the stereotypes being portrayed in TBH. 

 

There are hypersensitive people in every group.   The best way to deal with this is to NOT classify oneself as belonging to a group.    

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Question: have rural white southerners ever taken offense to The Beverly Hillbillies?

no, of course not! they understand that it is all meant in fun. that it is humor and not meant to be taken seriously.

 

 

 

Even though there is no such place called Bugtussle, they were modeled after true to life Ozark Mountain hillbillies.

 

Circa 1920's

p708665904-3.jpg

 

 

Modern day  ... are they offended? I doubt it.

 

winters-bone_02.jpg

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Even though there is no such place called Bugtussle, they were modeled after true to life Ozark Mountain hillbillies.

 

Circa 1920's

p708665904-3.jpg

 

 

Modern day  ... are they offended? I doubt it.

 

winters-bone_02.jpg

Yeah, but I still can't help wandering where Petticoat Junction, Hooterville, Pixley and Crabwell Corners are. :D

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Political correctness gets in the way of ANY intelligent and/or interesting endeavor.

 

 

Sepiatone

I tend to agree. I have been disappointed in Ken Levine's comments where he seems to be warning audiences, instead of extolling the virtues of the Neil Simon films he happens to be screening. I feel it's a backward approach and implies that he is so embarrassed by half of Simon's films that maybe he shouldn't have selected them.

 

I hope he stumbles across this thread, because I believe I have a valid criticism of his introductory and closing remarks that he should really think about.

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I tend to agree. I have been disappointed in Ken Levine's comments where he seems to be warning audiences, instead of extolling the virtues of the Neil Simon films he happens to be screening. I feel it's a backward approach and implies that he is so embarrassed by half of Simon's films that maybe he shouldn't have selected them.

 

I hope he stumbles across this thread, because I believe I have a valid criticism of his introductory and closing remarks that he should really think about.

Mr. Levine is telling the audience what to think of the movies he is presenting--an attitude very disrespectful of the right to free expression.

Opinion changes all the time; what do you bet that what is politically correct on 16 January 2015 will no longer be so on 16 January 2020?

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Mr. Levine is telling the audience what to think of the movies he is presenting--an attitude very disrespectful of the right to free expression.

Opinion changes all the time; what do you bet that what is politically correct on 16 January 2015 will no longer be so on 16 January 2020?

Or it could keep going in the current direction, but become even more restrictive. That's what a lot of people who espouse political correctness want to happen. They want to put the kibosh on what they deem inappropriate. They dig their heels in for the good fight and get more aggressive to counter the inevitable backlash. So free speech is even more at risk. Therefore, by 2020, we may find wraparound comments on a cable channel like this to be even more guiding about what is supposedly correct or incorrect in terms of film story material.

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I don't pay any attention to the wrap around comments, I pay to see the films. I do have to wonder though, why TCM still does not show too many Jolson or Cantor films????? Does it have anything to do with the BLACKFACE/MINSTREL routines?  

Have you seen many Jolson films? I saw one that wasn't The Jazz Singer and couldn't turn it off fast enough. He was a TERrible actor.

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Since rural white southerners were the oppressors and not the oppressed

back in the day, I suppose they can afford to take things with a touch of

humor and fun.

Some white oppressors, photographed near the main entrance to their estate, enjoying some tasty white privilegekids-300.jpg

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I don't pay any attention to the wrap around comments, I pay to see the films. I do have to wonder though, why TCM still does not show too many Jolson or Cantor films????? Does it have anything to do with the BLACKFACE/MINSTREL routines?  

If so, it must be some more recent occurance, because TCM WAS the first place I ever SAW "THE JAZZ SINGER" for my VERY FIRST time!  Blackface and all! 

 

 

Sepiatone

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If so, it must be some more recent occurance, because TCM WAS the first place I ever SAW "THE JAZZ SINGER" for my VERY FIRST time!  Blackface and all! 

 

 

Sepiatone

If poitically incorrect statements and actions were a big deal to TCM, hardly ANY '30s and '40s films would pass muster.

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