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TCM Board Members' Home-Town Photos


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I live in a small town named Montose, Colorado which is in SW Colorado far far from the Denver area.  Montrose has about 20,000 people and is just north of the largest mountain range in Colorado called the San Juan Mountains which contain numerous high and magnificent peaks which start about 25 miles S and SE of town.  Montrose sits at 5800 feet in what is called the Uncompahgre Valley.  Just a few miles NE of Montrose is an amazing place called The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park which is thousands of feet deep where the Gunnison River cuts through the high uplands.  Here are a few pictures of the area I took last week while out and about on 4x4 trails looking at the views and spring wildflowers.  Picture #1 looks NE at the town of Montrose about 6-7 miles distant in the river valley where it sits.

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That's 4-X land for sure. Is all that open for exploring, or private?

Do you have any tequila sunrise/sunset pics?

All the land down in the valley is private but most of the higher forested land and above is Federal BLM or Forest Service land and thereby open for hiking, climbing, 4x4/horse exploration, hunting, fishing, camping, backpacking within the appropriate land laws. There are several nearby huge Wilderness areas with great hiking and wandering plus hundreds of miles of nearby high alpine 4x4 trails which follow old silver/gold mining trails from the late 1800's near the mountains towns of Ouray, Silverton, Telluride, and Lake City which all started out as mining towns in the late 1800's.  The high mountains have a number of old mining sites and ghost town areas.  There are a number of famous old high pass 4x4 routes that hit near or above 13,000 ft.  I really don't have sunsise/sunset pictures as I take more wildflower and daytime scenery pictures. 

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What's that large, snow capped mountain range in the distance? 

In photo #3, Mt. Sneffels at 14,157 ft is the taller triangular peak in the Mt. Sneffels Range/Wilderness Area.  In photo #2 in the center are Coxcomb Peak and Mt. Redcliffe both of which are high 13er's.  Just out of sight beyond redcliffe and coxcomb are two 14er's called Uncompahgre Peak and The Wetterhorn.  There are half a dozen other 14er's in the San Juan Mountains as well. 

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The Dakota on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, about ten minutes walk from where I live. Lauren Bacall lives here. Here's some information about this venerable building, including a list of famous residents.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dakota

 

Always thought that a rather odd name for a NYC building.

 

(...'cause I thought EVERYBODY knew "the Dakota" never made it further east than the Mississippi River!) ;)

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Dargo, I look forward to them!  I tried to post a link to some information about the Dakota, but I couldn't make the link work here. Here's an excerpt from Wikipedia, about the name:

 

"According to often-repeated stories, the Dakota was so named because at the time it was built (1880-84), the Upper West Side of Manhattan was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote as the Dakota Territory. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota's long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray's book New York Streetscapes: "Probably it was called 'Dakota' because it was so far west and so far north". According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark's fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. High above the 72nd Street entrance, the figure of a Dakota Indian keeps watch."

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Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village, taken today, May 7. The Arch was built in 1892, modeled by architect Stanford White on the Arc de Triomphe. White's murder by his lover's husband was enacted in The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing, in which Ray Milland plays White. White is also featured in Ragtime. The Park and Arch, surrounded by NYU buildings, are featured in many movies.

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The City is slowly reclaiming abandoned and neglected areas in the downtown area as well as buying out small businesses adjacent to them. Recently, it has repurchased the one square block area next to my residence with what was most recently an auto repair facility - prior to that a car dealership - prior to that a grocery store - now, the Tax Man. A nice piece of artwork.

 

We're only 3 weeks past the due date.. is everyone paid up? This is only 1/2 block from my house. I was out for a stroll last evening and noticed they left the lights on - had to catch a pic. It's just one, big, green, art deco display - and the backdrop isn't too bad either.

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I would guess you wouldn't get this much in NYC but, I've noticed when I'm about shooting pics, people in the area tend to go on the defensive. I've nearly been accosted several times by those who's vehicles happened to be in front of me while I was taking a pic. And it's strange.. they don't mind me taking their photo.. "just lay off-o-my car, man!" 

 

I stopped to get something to eat yesterday afternoon and I took my camera (in it's bag) inside with me, just to be safe. As I approached the counter, there were two County Sheriffs in front of me and they perked right up when they saw the bag. My first thought was "Oh crap! They think I might be a bomber!" I was wearing a floppy canvas fisherman's hat and dark shades - just the thing, right? I kept my hands in front of me and away from the bag at all times. I was going to open it so they could see it was just my camera stuff but thought I better not push my luck. When I reached into my pocket to pay, both gave me a glance - nothing. They left, licking their ice cream cones on the way out. Whew!

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Kid, your photo is amazing, more LA than Florida!  Regarding your suspicious cops at the counter, I'm reminded of the scene in Dark Passage, when Bogie goes in to the diner.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A street in New York City named for a former resident.

I notice the sign reads: E 49 ST

 

and below: KATHARINE HEPBURN

                                   PLACE

 

Would mail be delivered to either street address, or is Ms. Hepburn's sign for the tourists?

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I notice the sign reads: E 49 ST

 

and below: KATHARINE HEPBURN

                                   PLACE

 

Would mail be delivered to either street address, or is Ms. Hepburn's sign for the tourists?

I don't think letters would be addressed that way.  Katharine Hepburn Place is, I think, just the intersection of 49th Street/2nd Avenue. Her address was 244 East 49th Street, which is between 2nd/3rd Aves. She lived there for more than 60 years. 

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I don't think letters would be addressed that way.  Katharine Hepburn Place is, I think, just the intersection of 49th Street/2nd Avenue. Her address was 244 East 49th Street, which is between 2nd/3rd Aves. She lived there for more than 60 years. 

I was just wondering, as many times I have seen such signage in a different design and/or color to set it apart from the true street signage. I have never seen a street sign with PLACE that wasn't an actual address location. Interesting..

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Dabb, your photos are amazing! Great job! Not the easiest situation to photograph.

 

I have dealt with architecture for over 30 years as a restorer and am always amazed by cyclical "trends". In the "environmental" 70's & 80's, neon was discouraged and thought of as crass & tacky (re: It's A Wonderful Life's Pottersville) In a few places- Las Vegas & Miami for example- neon has almost always been seen as "artistry".

 

I'm more interested in the idea that buildings used to LOOK like what they were. You knew the Library, the Bank, the Post Office, the gas station in town because it looked a certain way. Even when the building became something else, you knew "that restaurant was in an old bank" building. I've often wondered if this was due to the US accepting so many immigrants? Or could it be, gulp, pride?

 

That Tax Collector building looks like it has a counter and serves breakfast. Weird.

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Dabb, your photos are amazing! Great job! Not the easiest situation to photograph.

 

I have dealt with architecture for over 30 years as a restorer and am always amazed by cyclical "trends". In the "environmental" 70's & 80's, neon was discouraged and thought of as crass & tacky (re: It's A Wonderful Life's Pottersville) In a few places- Las Vegas & Miami for example- neon has almost always been seen as "artistry".

 

I'm more interested in the idea that buildings used to LOOK like what they were. You knew the Library, the Bank, the Post Office, the gas station in town because it looked a certain way. Even when the building became something else, you knew "that restaurant was in an old bank" building. I've often wondered if this was due to the US accepting so many immigrants? Or could it be, gulp, pride?

 

That Tax Collector building looks like it has a counter and serves breakfast. Weird.

Thank you, TikiSoo. I haven't researched this, but the Tax Collector building appears pretty much as originally constructed - way back when. I've been told this was originally an early Publix Super Market. Publix and it's founder (George Jenkins) have a long history in Florida. I keep meaning to delve into this but something or other always seems to derail my intentions.

 

There are still quite a few old gas stations.. I should say "service stations".. which have been converted, mostly to quickie-marts with service bays enclosed. Still, the architecture remained and the bay door openings were obvious. You could tell a them at a glance. Funny thing, I've seen quite a few of those reopening their service bays - becoming service stations again. That's somewhat encouraging AND comforting, in a way.

 

Most of the libraries in my neighborhood are located on college campuses. Each has it's own dominant architectural style not in any way rooted in the past.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I took this photo yesterday on 11th Street in Greenwich Village, NYC. The row of old townhouses was changed forever on March 6, 1970, due to the premature detonation of a bomb that was being made in the basement by the Weather Underground, a radical group. It was big news in NYC at the time -- the people making the bomb were killed. Dustin Hoffman lived in the house next door and is seen in a documentary about the Weather Underground. The modern house you see in the photo was a replacement for the house that was completely destroyed in the explosion.

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