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Movie mistakes


hamradio
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http://news.moviefone.com/2014/04/10/family-movie-mistakes/

 

Can't figure out the larger Ariel photo, LOL!

HR, I don't think the image at the top of the page is meant for comparison but as an example of a Family Movie (?). The photo set for comparison mentions the hair in a ponytail, but neglects to mention the loss of the bow (rather prominent in the first scene).

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HR, I don't think the image at the top of the page is meant for comparison but as an example of a Family Movie (?). The photo set for comparison mentions the hair in a ponytail, but neglects to mention the loss of the bow (rather prominent in the first scene).

You're right, the larger photo may not be meant for comparison.  I kept wondering about the seahorses but can't find anything.  I like when people spot the littlest errors in films.

 

Here's one someone spotted in "North By Northwest".

http://www.moviemistakes.com/picture5486

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Usually in scenes where the camera angle moves from one person to another in a face to face conversation is where you'll spot the most mistakes.  Someone might be holding up a hand or a cup of coffee to his face when they're being talked to, but when the angle cuts quickly to the other person, the first one isn't holding that hand, or cup anymore, but it returns when the scene cuts back.  I can't name a specific movie I've seen this in, as I've seen it in several.

 

Sepiatone

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Usually in scenes where the camera angle moves from one person to another in a face to face conversation is where you'll spot the most mistakes.  Someone might be holding up a hand or a cup of coffee to his face when they're being talked to, but when the angle cuts quickly to the other person, the first one isn't holding that hand, or cup anymore, but it returns when the scene cuts back.  I can't name a specific movie I've seen this in, as I've seen it in several.

 

Sepiatone

 

"White Christmas" (1954) involving a coffee pot.

 

"Rebecca" (1940) involving cup and saucer, plus at the beginning Joan Fontaine is seen drinking coffee but in the next shot she's reading the newspaper

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I spotted a mistake not long ago while watching, "The Gang's All Here" 1943...while Alice Faye is singing in the "apartment" the lamp completely changes.  I'm guessing that somebody acidentally broke it and they had to replace it with another before they finished the scene.

 

I have a tendency to look at the backgrounds and notice way too many times when the extras walking back & forth are constantly in the shot...I end up counting how many times they walk back & forth...I'm thinking of "you've got mail" at the outside cafe. 

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Usually in scenes where the camera angle moves from one person to another in a face to face conversation is where you'll spot the most mistakes.  Someone might be holding up a hand or a cup of coffee to his face when they're being talked to, but when the angle cuts quickly to the other person, the first one isn't holding that hand, or cup anymore, but it returns when the scene cuts back.  I can't name a specific movie I've seen this in, as I've seen it in several.

 

Sepiatone

Maddenly interesting, isn't it?  :)

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I think I know how it happens. Depending on the shooting script, the prop will be in it and the action noted.  But with each successive take, either the scene actions are taken out of sequence, or the director changes the action either later or earlier in the scene, or drops it entirely.   Continuity is suppose to catch those but they can be so caught up with dialog they miss it.   Actors too will make a gesture to round out a character on their own, and sometimes use the prop.  Couple this with an editor who's rushed, and there you have the result of the collaborative effort!  

:)

 
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This sort of thing hasn't stopped over the years.

 

In the 2001 version of OCEAN'S ELEVEN, Brad Pitt in one scene is seen eating shrimp from a flat plate.  The scene cuts to Julia Roberts walking down a staircase.  When it cuts back to Pitt, he's eating the shrimp out of a tall "cocktail" glass.

 

Sepiatone

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