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Movies You Can't Stand That Everyone Else Loves


Tikisoo
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The movies that come to mind because they are currently being discussed on this board:

 

DR ZHIVAGO - I don't find adultery particularly moving

RANDOM HARVEST- really? I don't believe this plot for a second

CASABLANCA- an ok movie, but not anything special

 

There's always arguments over comedians - comedy is so much a matter of taste that there will always be divisions over the movies of Red Skelton, Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis, etc.

 

MissWonderly pointed out she doesn't really like GWTW and thinks it's overrated. I love it, so that's more of what I'm talking about.

Dare to be different and respect others' opinions, please.

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Hah...too numerous to mention, but start with anything after 1960, and that'll do it for a start.

 

Next week, e.g., is horrific. Room 101.

 

Except for Wizard Of Oz and the cartoon version of Scrooge, musicals make my teeth itch and my skin crawl. Seven Brides, Rose Marie, Annie Get Your Gun, and Sound Of Music - another Room 101.

 

As I said, too numerous to mention.

 

Dare to be different and respect others' opinions, please.

 

What a wonderful, refreshing sentiment.

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To pick just one, Pirates of the Caribbean (only saw the first one, that was enough). Superficial CGI visual effects and a consistent winking tongue-in-cheek attitude that tells the audience to not take any of it seriously.

 

I like humour in my adventure films but I also want to get lost in adventure, and take it seriously, at least to some degree. Johnny Depp's performance was the only saving grace.

 

I was raised on the romance and stylish excitement of Errol Flynn adventures. This production just doesn't measure up to them, in my opinion.

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Terry Gilliam's Brazil, as big a pile of cinematic crap as ever appeared on screen, is a movie I can't stand that everyone else loves.  The state as big brother is always a popular theme, and most people liked this sloppy, ridiculous film. George Orwell did it better in 1984. I actually think Terry Gilliam is a pretty bad director, although his short bits of animation on Monty Python were fun. I walked out of Time Bandits; I couldn't walk out of Brazil, since I was in London and going to a dinner party in the neighborhood after the movie. And it was an especially long print -- it was later cut for the American release, but not enough.

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An American in Paris, I cannot stand it! I agree with primosprimos it has to be a special musical for me to like it. But the film is generic to me, the acting and story are not amazing, it seems like the ballet at the end is what makes people consider it a masterpiece.

The Bridge on the River Kwai, yes my generation has short attention spands but this movie is so sleep inducing. Now Lawrence of Arabia is Lean's best.

Lover Come Back, as far as I'm concerned there are only two Hudson and Day films.

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Out of over 3000 movies I've rated, these 11 are at the bottom of the list for those that are both well known and  generally loved and admired

 

Bonnie and Clyde

The Graduate

Five Easy Pieces

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Zorba the Greek

San Francisco

Bus Stop

Forbidden Planet

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

The Miracle of Morgan's Creek

The Searchers

 

If I'd added the many movies I watched halfway through and gave up on in despair, the list would have been a lot longer, and would have likely included anything and everything made by Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Red Skelton, Esther Williams, Elvis Presley, all "Swashbuckler" films and Bible Epics, all Costume Dramas, all "adventure" movies featuring noble whites and various dark-skinned savages, and any "Beach Party" or "Singing Cowboys" movies.  The common denominator here is "When you've seen one, you've seen em all".

 

Other than that, I'm easy. :)

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In The Heat of the Night

 

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

 

To Kill A Mockingbird

 

Pulp Fiction

 

The Grapes of Wrath

 

Citizen Kane

 

Apocalypse Now 

 

Midnight Cowboy

 

The Maltese Falcon

 

A Streetcar Named Desire

 

Taxi Driver

 

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolfe

 

More to follow when I think of 'em...

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BONNIE AND CLYDE - A film I've revisited once every decade to see if I could see its greatness - I still can't find it.

 

THE GRADUATE - I just never believe that Ben or Elaine have something going on. Besides, I'm sure it will all end after she asks him "Who's better in bed, my mother or me?"

 

WUTHERING HEIGHTS - Two hours of "I love you, I hate you, I love you, I hate you."

 

THE PRODUCERS - too much yelling, it wears me out.

 

Just about anything with Betty Hutton. I'm also not as enamored of Preston Sturges as most seem to be, but do like THE GREAT McGINTY and SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS (with a few minor reservations).

 

IMITATION OF LIFE (1959) makes me laugh more than most comedies ("Annie, I didn't know you had any friends").

 

THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY - Yeah, give the guy his gun back, he said he's OK now. Can you really trust a guy named Humphrey Agnew? (that goes for both names folks, I don't trust politicians at all)

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Although "can't stand" is probably too strong, I can make a virtually endless list of popular movies that do nothing for me:

 

Dr Zhivago of Arabia on the River Kwai

 

Any Woody Allen movie after Annie Hall (and even his good movies with Diane Keaton lose points because of DK's presence). I do in fact HATE that these films were loved by the highbrows and took WA away from his field of genius (comedy) to be a 4th rate imitator of Ingmar Resnais.

 

Vertigo

 

The Graduate

 

Tom Jones

 

Anything by Tarantino or the Coen Bros

 

Anything by Kubrick after Dr Strangelove

 

Pretty much anything after Duel for Spielberg and American Graffiti for Lucas.

 

Actors and Actresses:

 

Meryl Streep (okay her I hate)

 

Albert Finney

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Wowie Kazowie. And I thoughtwas being contrary, with my dislike for Gone with the Wind. (Thanks for taking note of that, TikiSoo, baby, in your OP.)

 

So everyone gets mad at me for trashing GWTW, but at least that's just one movie.A lot of people here are dismissing entire genres and directors.

 

Ok, "this means war", as Bugs Bunny ominously declared once. Several times, actually.

 

(I'm just kidding, keep your underwear on everyone. It's just fun to say "This means war!".)

 

Most movies made by John Ford.

Most movies starring John Wayne.

Extreme graphic limb-chopping blood spurting horror films.

Most movies starring Katharine Hepburn.

Ok, Katharine Hepburn.

Most movies starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy.

 

Really interesting thread topic, Tiki, thanks for starting it. There's nothing like a little (polite) disagreement to get things going. 

 

Wait, I just have to add:

Big fat David Lean epics...in ascending order,

Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, and the worst, Doctor Zhivago (as I've said before, every time I see Julie Christie smiling and looking nobly into the sky, with the strains of "Somewhere My Love" floating in  the background, I want to dump a samovar of Russian tea over her head.)

 

Epics. Period. Also, period epics. All epics, in fact, off hand can't think of any exceptions. I say if gawd had wanted movies to be three or four hours long he would have put it in The Ten Commandments. (deliberate allusion, yes.)

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In effort to answer this question I went to IMDb's "Top 250, as voted by regular IMDb users", and to see if I could find a movie on that list which I've found "I couldn't stand".

 

And ya know, after thinking about each and every movie for a few seconds on that list and which I've ever watched, I can honestly say that none of them elicited that sort of negative response by me. Maybe I'm just too "easy" and/or "undiscerning", eh?!

 

(...oh wait...okay...there were a few films on that list directed by Ingmar Bergman which have always put me to sleep every time I've attempted to sit through them, but I wouldn't necessarily say "I cain't stand 'em"...as Lina Lamont might say!)  

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Confessional here:

 

The Godfather (any of the 3)

 

Many, but not all of the Coen Bros movies. Fargo is the top of the list.

 

Most superhero stories, since I feel the formula is pretty rote.

 

Horror/gore,  since I know how they make them.   Carrie is the top of that list.

 

Most romantic comedies made after 1990.  

 

Dramas on Lifetime.   facepalm

 

I hear ya about Dr. Zhivago.  

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As well as ..."What a moroon".

 

Anyway, I don't understand why movies made from comic books are so popular. Any superhero or group of them makes my skin crawl. Batman, Superman, Spiderman, the Avengers, Iron Man hold no interest for me. I'll just stay home and watch a movie from the Golden Age.

Although I've seen all the Star Trek movies and have enjoyed most of them, I cringe whenever a beloved character dies and just sit back and count the minutes until his resurrection.

 

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Ok, "this means war", as Bugs Bunny ominously declared once. Several times, actually.

 

(I'm just kidding, keep your underwear on everyone. It's just fun to say "This means war!".)

 

 

 

Ahem...let us not forget that Bugs "borrowed" that line from the guy whose picture you see off to the left here, MissW...err...Edith!

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Confessional here:

 

Many, but not all of the Coen Bros movies. Fargo is the top of the list.

 

 

Yeah, I know. You folks from THAT part of the country STILL are a little miffed about those accents used in that one, aren't ya?!

 

(...well sorry Char, but after all the time I spent in Minneapolis while attending recurrent training classes for Northwest Airlines, in brrrrrrrrr JANUARY I might add!, that's EXACTLY how you folks SOUND up in that, brrrrrrrr, neck of the woods!!!!)  :D

 

;)

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"A Beautiful Mind"

All "Die Hard" movies

"Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves"  (1991)

"Braveheart"

"Apocalypse Now"

"Singing in the Rain" as well as most musicals not starring Rogers/Astaire

Anything with Sylvester Stallone except "Rocky" #1.

Most movies in the last 15 years.  I won't even go see anything modern except an occasional movie like "The King's Speech"  or "The Book Thief". 

"The Shining"

Lana Turner

Grace Kelly

Randolph Scott

Liz Taylor except for her youthful movies where she was so absolutely charming

Tom Cruise- A big yuch

Johnny Depp-A big yuch.

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Oh Char, something we disagree about. ( can I end a sentence with "about"? I don't think so, but I just did.)

I love the Coen brothers. There are maybe one or two films they made that didn't work, and that I don't enjoy watching ( Intolerable Cruelty was not successful, their attempt to revisit Doris Day type comedy fell flat). And there are also a couple that I haven't yet seen , so can't comment on them.

 

But, "on the whole", I love the Coen brothers, the films they make, what they are about. Whatever their mission statement is - and I'm sure they don't have one, that would be anti-Coenetic - I agree with it.

 

Oddly enough though, you're far from alone. I bet for every post here stating a dislike of Coen brothers movies, there are 50 "lurkers" reading this thread who feel the same way.

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The Lion in Winter gave me a headache.

 

I walked out of Slumdog Millionaire after about 30 minutes, the only time I've ever walked out of a movie.

 

If The Lion in Winter gave you a headache did you get a migraine watching Who's Afraid of Virgina Woolf?

 

I ask because the back and forth banter in both movie has a similar over the top vibe.  

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I agree that "can't stand" is probably too intense, but I do not like the following movies that so many others seem to love:

 

DR ZHIVAGO

FORREST GUMP (in fact most any movie with Tom Hanks)

 

I don't like those two either but based on the comments at this thread Dr Zhivago doesn't appear to fit the theme of this theard.

 

We need to find someone that does like it. 

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I love the Coen brothers. There are maybe one or two films they made that didn't work, and that I don't enjoy watching . . .

But, "on the whole", I love the Coen brothers, the films they make, what they are about.

 

Although I would not say I am a Coen brothers fan,  there are two of their movies that i really like :

RAISING ARIZONA

FARGO 

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While I don't have as large a list of movies I vehemently hate, I do have a few. 

 

Apocalypse Now- it might just be the most boring movie I've ever seen

The Godfather- James Caan getting shot up in the toll booth and the horse head were the best parts

South Pacific

Avatar

Birth of a Nation- okay, I don't know if everyone "loves" this movie, I saw it however and it may have been more boring than "Apocalypse Now."

Lord of the Rings- all of movies, all the Hobbit movies-- boring! The best character was Gollum

The Matrix- all of them.  Again, boring!

 

There are probably more; but these are the films that I hated the most.  Not that I think any of these movies are bad per say (with the exception of Avatar), they just did not hold my attention at all. 

 

I'm not into the action films (of the Nicholas Cage, Bruce Willis, Jason Stathum, etc. variety).  To quote Debbie Reynolds in Singin' in the Rain: "once you've seen one, you've seen them all." These action movies just contain tons of CGI, car chases, explosions, cursing... nothing interesting enough to hold my attention. 

 

The movies that air on the Hallmark channel.  A Hallmark Channel film will have one of three standard storylines:

 

1) Boy and Girl meet.  Girl will inevitably make a fool of herself in front of boy, only to find out later that boy is in charge of an organization that she needs to work with.  Boy will find her endearing.  A snag in the plans will inevitably threaten their happy ending, but it will all work out in the end.  Boy and girl live happily ever after.

 

2) Boy and Girl meet.  Girl's family business is in trouble.  Boy does something amazing and selfless to help save the family business.  Family business is saved.  Everyone lives happily ever after.

 

3) Girl buys business that she knows nothing about.  She meets boy and falls in love with him.  Unbeknownst to her, boy works for (or owns) rival business to girl's business.  Rival business (usually boy's father) plans on shutting down (or buying out) girl's business.  Girl finds out, is mad at boy and dumps him.  Even though he had nothing to do with his father's plans.  He did at first, but fell in love with girl and wanted to help her.  Boy thwarts dad's plans, saves girl's business, they all live happily ever after. 

 

 

 

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A few I actually like that many hate on this thread...

 

Midnight Cowboy, simply because it is so offbeat, the two leads are likable and the harmonica playing adds to its nice gloomy lonely feel

 

Dr. Zhivago, despite Julie Christie looking more Mod London than post-October Revolution in her hair style... and the fact it takes too many liberties with the book. I also like drippy, repetitive film scores... this and the '68 version of ROMEO AND JULIET are notorious for driving movie-goers screaming in the same state of rage as parents leaving the Disney theme park "It's A Small World" ride.

 

Bonnie & Clyde... for the same reason I like Dr. Zhivago. Faye Dunaway belongs to the sixties, not the thirties. Also the bluegrass music doesn't belong either. All of this adds to its charm. A sixties film nostalgic of the thirties.

 

Gone With The Wind... despite its length, I've never fallen asleep during the couple times I've sat through it. I also like movies with a lot of blubbering and death scenes drawn out.

 

Slumdog Millionaire... many who dislike this one generally dislike all of the Best Picture winners of the last decade or two anyway. Had it been made in the 1970s or earlier, it might have a more favorable following. Not that it is a masterpiece, mind you, but the music score and editing style is entertaining.

 

An American In Paris... then again, I'll sit through anything with Gene Kelly in it.

 

Jurassic Park... just ignore the silly dialogue and enjoy the beasties. Most watch THE TEN COMMANDMENTS for unintended laughs too.

 

Miracle On Morgan's Creek... since it proves folks in the 1940s were doing "it", even if Eddie was still scared about guns going off.

 

The Graduate & Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf... since it proves folks in the 1960s weren't doing "it" as much as they would like and were verbally attacking each other

 

The remaining David Lean films... including Bridge On the River Kwai. As long as they have a choo-choo. A Lean movie without a choo-choo is too Lean for me.

 

Esther Williams and Elvis Presley movies... you have to be in the proper frame of mind. OK, OK, OK... I will admit FIESTA, CHANGE OF HABIT and CLAMBAKE are difficult outings.

 

A few I agree are over-rated all the way to the Pearly Gates... although I still kinda-sorta like them...

 

Citizen Kane, a nice art piece with lots of pretty images, but so much more a masterpiece than ONE FROGGY EVENING? Don't make me laugh. If nothing else, Orson's Ego Trip is amusing to watch. No wonder Hollywood went against him.

 

Vertigo, the least entertaining Hitchcock, which is EXACTLY why the critics love it. Yet Barbara Bel Geddes is amusing. Her "Stupid! stupid! stupid!" line can easily apply to SIGHT & SOUND.

 

Easy Rider... you had to be there when it angered Vice President Spiro Agnew. That was the whole "point" of why everybody went to see it. Today, it is just a museum piece like BIRTH OF A NATION.

 

On The Waterfront... yeah, the acting is good... For Its Time. The fifties were sure a preachy decade, whether it was religious epics by DeMille or Wyler or "social conscious" pictures. Half the movies then gave us a lecture.

 

Marty... does the guy have no backbone? Or was Borgnine compensating for being such a bully in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY?

 

The Godfather trilogy... some fanatics need another franchise to become fanatical about, like Star Wars or Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter or... yeah, the fanatics needs something ELSE to be fanatical about.

 

Forrest Gump... had it not beaten PULP FICTION at the Oscars, maybe the know-it-all critics wouldn't be over-praising the other. Surprisingly many critics view this one much like TITANIC and THE SOUND OF MUSIC... just another crowd pleaser not to be taken seriously. All three are set in an earlier time period and all three screw up trying to get it "right".

 

Sunrise... yes, the photography sure is perty, Murnau had talent and the post-German Expressionism lighting might have been innovative for its time. Not much story though. Also WINGS has more of a sense of humor and Clara Bow in varying states of undress.

 

The Lion King... BAMBI was better

 

 

These are probably my least favorite "darlings" of the movie buffs and the TV broadcasters:

 

Pulp Fiction... yeah, the editing style is unique, but why do critics so love all of that bloodshed? Oh I forgot. They were furious that Gump won.

 

The Deer Hunter

... I am OK with COMING HOME and a few others, since they get to the point faster.

 

Born On The 4th Of July

... it was bad enough that we must hear the full "American Pie" while Tommy is in hospital agony, but it was also anachronistically heard three years before it was recorded. So many '80s films screwed up the '60s in their presentation.

 

Dirty Dancing...

... ditto. Yet I guess the frizzy 80s hairstyles posing for 1963 may not be any worse than Julie Christie in Zhivago

 

Do The Right Thing

Crash

A Beautiful Mind

... I so wanted to like these for their noble intentions...

 

Saving Private Ryan... except for a couple minutes in the invasion scene

Shakespeare In Love... except for the humorous sex scene. Was 1998 that lackluster a year?

 

Brian's Song

Maybe had I actually sat through a full Super Bowl game?

 

LA Confidential

Blue Velvet

... I guess there is a reason so many high brows love these. Some day I will understand why, but give me more time.

 

The Notebook

Ghost

... I am always scratching my head over these chick flick's undying appeal. Surprisingly, I do... oddly... like NOTTING HILL and that is one that fewer chick flick fans like.

 

Braveheart

... and any medieval epic in which the star has Colgate teeth and Soloflex abs

 

Top Gun

The Terminator

Rambo First Blood 2

The Fight Club

Gladiator

... this is why we have so many Cialis ads on TV today

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