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Movies You Can't Stand That Everyone Else Loves


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I find it interesting that I'm allowed to say I don't like Gone with the Wind here without any repercussions, but on the thread about GWTW, everyone was furious with me for daring to say it.

 

Guess it must be a case of "everything has its place". I'm allowed to say I don't like it here, because that's the purpose of this thread.

I'm not allowed to say it on the thread dedicated to Gone with the Wind, because that thread's purpose is (presumably) to praise it and discuss it - but only in a way that shows you still like it.

 

I will say, since I assume it's ok for me to say it on this thread, that one reason I don't like it is because it's boring. It's boring to me. After the first half (which, as I've said, is all right, I'm ok with the first half of the film), it just goes on and on about Scarlett and Rhett and Ashley and Mellie and so much happens and so many years pass and that poor little girl dies and Scarlett, for all those years she's married to Rhett, can't make up her mind -

Dang, it's exhausting just thinking about it all. It's just one big boring melodrama to me. After a while, like Rhett, I just don't give a damn.

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Wow, so many.  Just off the top of my head:

 

STAR WARS (et al)

SAVING PRIVATE RYAN

ALIEN (et al)

JURASSIC PARK

VERTIGO

FUNNY FACE

MY FAIR LADY

FORREST GUMP

CITIZEN KANE

THE LION KING

Anything with Katharine Hepburn, except STAGE DOOR

Anything with Barbra Streisand, except HELLO, DOLLY!

Anything directed by George Cukor

Anything directed by Stanley Kubrick

Anything directed by David Lean post 1957

 

lots more (too many in the last 15 years to list)

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Yeah, I know. You folks from THAT part of the country STILL are a little miffed about those accents used in that one, aren't ya?!

 

(...well sorry Char, but after all the time I spent in Minneapolis while attending recurrent training classes for Northwest Airlines, in brrrrrrrrr JANUARY I might add!, that's EXACTLY how you folks SOUND up in that, brrrrrrrr, neck of the woods!!!!)  :D

 

;)

Guilty as charged, Dargo--when excited.    Otherwise, I'm pretty "Illinois"-sounding, or rather from Chicago.  I don't where I get that, but it's nice to be considered from Chicago.  

 

Just so I can be clear, it isn't all the Coen Bros on my "OUT" list, but these are:

 

Fargo 

Barton Fink

Blood Simple

Miller's Crossing

Burn After Reading

 

But the ones I really like:

Hudsucker Proxy

Intolerable Cruelty

O' Brother Where Are Thou?

 

Many times it is just a particular genre Joel and Ethan use in their storytelling that doesn't interest me.   

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Because I was with my girlfriend. When the intermission came, I said to her "Do you want to stay for the rest of this?" Thankfully she said "Not really, let's go".

 

We were a well-matched couple at that time.

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After turning back to TCM from the ballgame in order to record Spione at midnight, I have to add one more set of movies that drive me to the funny farm:

 

ANYTHING with Howard Keel in it.  I've seen about 10 minutes each of about half a dozen of his films, and his singing cowboy roles remind me of everything I hate about a certain type of "family entertainment" movies.  I'd rather watch Hitler do a jig with Lady Godiva's horse at halftime in the Super Bowl (which admittedly would be an improvement over the usual Super Bowl halftime entertainment) than to sit through another minute of Howard Keel's baritone bleeting.

 

Seriously, I'm now going to have to watch Goodfellas, Pink Flamingos, and the barroom brawl between the Mafia and the Hell's Angels in A Bronx Tale just to get ten minutes of Howard Keel in Annie, Get Your Gun out of my system. :ph34r:

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After turning back to TCM from the ballgame in order to record Spione at midnight, I have to add one more set of movies that drive me to the funny farm:

 

ANYTHING with Howard Keel in it.  I've seen about 10 minutes each of about half a dozen of his films, and his singing cowboy roles remind me of everything I hate about a certain type of "family entertainment" movies.  I'd rather watch Hitler do a jig with Lady Godiva's horse at halftime in the Super Bowl (which admittedly would be an improvement over the usual Super Bowl halftime entertainment) than to sit through another minute of Howard Keel's baritone bleeting.

 

Seriously, I'm now going to have to watch Goodfellas, Pink Flamingos, and the barroom brawl between the Mafia and the Hell's Angels in A Bronx Tale just to get ten minutes of Howard Keel in Annie, Get Your Gun out of my system. :ph34r:

Yea, Keel gives me the hives as well.  Bleh.

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A few I actually like that many hate on this thread...

 

Midnight Cowboy, simply because it is so offbeat, the two leads are likable and the harmonica playing adds to its nice gloomy lonely feel

 

Dr. Zhivago, despite Julie Christie looking more Mod London than post-October Revolution in her hair style... and the fact it takes too many liberties with the book. I also like drippy, repetitive film scores... this and the '68 version of ROMEO AND JULIET are notorious for driving movie-goers screaming in the same state of rage as parents leaving the Disney theme park "It's A Small World" ride.

 

Bonnie & Clyde... for the same reason I like Dr. Zhivago. Faye Dunaway belongs to the sixties, not the thirties. Also the bluegrass music doesn't belong either. All of this adds to its charm. A sixties film nostalgic of the thirties.

 

Gone With The Wind... despite its length, I've never fallen asleep during the couple times I've sat through it. I also like movies with a lot of blubbering and death scenes drawn out.

 

Slumdog Millionaire... many who dislike this one generally dislike all of the Best Picture winners of the last decade or two anyway. Had it been made in the 1970s or earlier, it might have a more favorable following. Not that it is a masterpiece, mind you, but the music score and editing style is entertaining.

 

An American In Paris... then again, I'll sit through anything with Gene Kelly in it.

 

Jurassic Park... just ignore the silly dialogue and enjoy the beasties. Most watch THE TEN COMMANDMENTS for unintended laughs too.

 

Miracle On Morgan's Creek... since it proves folks in the 1940s were doing "it", even if Eddie was still scared about guns going off.

 

The Graduate & Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf... since it proves folks in the 1960s weren't doing "it" as much as they would like and were verbally attacking each other

 

The remaining David Lean films... including Bridge On the River Kwai. As long as they have a choo-choo. A Lean movie without a choo-choo is too Lean for me.

 

Esther Williams and Elvis Presley movies... you have to be in the proper frame of mind. OK, OK, OK... I will admit FIESTA, CHANGE OF HABIT and CLAMBAKE are difficult outings.

 

A few I agree are over-rated all the way to the Pearly Gates... although I still kinda-sorta like them...

 

Citizen Kane, a nice art piece with lots of pretty images, but so much more a masterpiece than ONE FROGGY EVENING? Don't make me laugh. If nothing else, Orson's Ego Trip is amusing to watch. No wonder Hollywood went against him.

 

Vertigo, the least entertaining Hitchcock, which is EXACTLY why the critics love it. Yet Barbara Bel Geddes is amusing. Her "Stupid! stupid! stupid!" line can easily apply to SIGHT & SOUND.

 

Easy Rider... you had to be there when it angered Vice President Spiro Agnew. That was the whole "point" of why everybody went to see it. Today, it is just a museum piece like BIRTH OF A NATION.

 

On The Waterfront... yeah, the acting is good... For Its Time. The fifties were sure a preachy decade, whether it was religious epics by DeMille or Wyler or "social conscious" pictures. Half the movies then gave us a lecture.

 

Marty... does the guy have no backbone? Or was Borgnine compensating for being such a bully in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY?

 

The Godfather trilogy... some fanatics need another franchise to become fanatical about, like Star Wars or Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter or... yeah, the fanatics needs something ELSE to be fanatical about.

 

Forrest Gump... had it not beaten PULP FICTION at the Oscars, maybe the know-it-all critics wouldn't be over-praising the other. Surprisingly many critics view this one much like TITANIC and THE SOUND OF MUSIC... just another crowd pleaser not to be taken seriously. All three are set in an earlier time period and all three screw up trying to get it "right".

 

Sunrise... yes, the photography sure is perty, Murnau had talent and the post-German Expressionism lighting might have been innovative for its time. Not much story though. Also WINGS has more of a sense of humor and Clara Bow in varying states of undress.

 

The Lion King... BAMBI was better

 

 

These are probably my least favorite "darlings" of the movie buffs and the TV broadcasters:

 

Pulp Fiction... yeah, the editing style is unique, but why do critics so love all of that bloodshed? Oh I forgot. They were furious that Gump won.

 

The Deer Hunter

... I am OK with COMING HOME and a few others, since they get to the point faster.

 

Born On The 4th Of July

... it was bad enough that we must hear the full "American Pie" while Tommy is in hospital agony, but it was also anachronistically heard three years before it was recorded. So many '80s films screwed up the '60s in their presentation.

 

Dirty Dancing...

... ditto. Yet I guess the frizzy 80s hairstyles posing for 1963 may not be any worse than Julie Christie in Zhivago

 

Do The Right Thing

Crash

A Beautiful Mind

... I so wanted to like these for their noble intentions...

 

Saving Private Ryan... except for a couple minutes in the invasion scene

Shakespeare In Love... except for the humorous sex scene. Was 1998 that lackluster a year?

 

Brian's Song

Maybe had I actually sat through a full Super Bowl game?

 

LA Confidential

Blue Velvet

... I guess there is a reason so many high brows love these. Some day I will understand why, but give me more time.

 

The Notebook

Ghost

... I am always scratching my head over these chick flick's undying appeal. Surprisingly, I do... oddly... like NOTTING HILL and that is one that fewer chick flick fans like.

 

Braveheart

... and any medieval epic in which the star has Colgate teeth and Soloflex abs

 

Top Gun

The Terminator

Rambo First Blood 2

The Fight Club

Gladiator

... this is why we have so many Cialis ads on TV today

 

:D

 

Sorry folks, but I found Jlewis' take here on these films so cleverly written that I just HAD to use the quote button and "play it again, Sam"!

 

(..."A Lean movie without a choo-choo is too Lean for me.", and, "this is why we have so many Cialis ads on TV today"...PRICELESS!!!!)   :D 

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Many of the films listed as disliked here are among my favorites, but I won't go into that. I also see that many I dislike are also disliked by others, and many of those are are on my list.

 

GWTW - boring to laughable

 

Dr. Zhivago - OK, Julie's nice to look at, but her acting is better suited to portraying trees

 

Pulp Fiction - Tarantino is clearly very talented, but he has the soul of a sadistic teen, with no moral compass

 

Bergman films - most see him as sensitive, but I see him as a cold-hearted Nordic a-hole

 

The Godfather - I don't need to be convinced that vicious people are human too

 

The Titanic - over-rated, formulaic, but it looks nice

 

ET - there are so many absurd plot holes in this that it is laughable. When first released, you could clearly see cigarette smoke when the kids were sitting around a table, with no adults present. I believe that was later removed 

 

Rosemary's Baby - I'm very much a Polanski fan, but I didn't like this one

 

Pirates of the Caribbean - I'm a big fan of Johnny Depp, but these vastly over-produced monstrosities can't compare with Captain Blood, as someone else said earlier

 

A Streetcar Named Desire - I'm a great fan of Brando, but the only character I find the slightest bit likable is Malden, and I can't get into all the anguish

 

Most early Eastwood films (the first one I liked was Bronco Billy.) I hate the Dirty Harry films - he is as evil as the bad guys. I think The Eiger Sanction, and The Gauntlet are two of the worst films ever made

 

Most films with Katherine Hepburn - she makes me want to strangle her, and I'm not a violent person

 

Most films with Frank Sinatra, just don't like the guy

 

Doris Day films - yuck!

 

Jerry Lewis films

 

Most musicals, but with many exceptions 

 

Most Spaghetti westerns, with few exceptions 

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One of my favorite stories my grandmother used to tell was about "The Wizard of Oz".    My grandparents lived about an hour outside of New York City and if they wanted to see a film they had to go into NYC to see it.   They decided to go see "The Wizard of Oz" when it came out.    So one Saturday night off they go to NYC.  They get seated and the movie starts.  Everything is great until it changes to color and the munchkins make their grand entrance.  They look at each other and say "what the heck is this" and walk out.     She told me when it came on tv, many decades later, they did eventually see it through to the end.  She was still not a fan  :)

 

For me, I must admit I do not enjoy anything with Jeanette MacDonald in it.  I can appreciate she was talented but I just can not watch her movies for more than a minute ( and I've tried ).  The only film she ever made that I did like, for the most part, was "San Francisco".    I thank Clark Gable for that.  

 

A few popular films i dislike that many seem to love:

Lawrence of Arabia 

Ben Hur ( both  versions )

North by Northwest ( and I love Cary Grant movies )

Anything with George Clooney, Tom Cruise, or Bruce Willis ( do not understand their popularity )

 

 

 

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Re: Jeanette MacDonald.  I'll admit, prior to seeing Part 2 of the MGM documentary that's been airing this past month, I had heard of her but had never seen what she looked like, sounded like or what films she has been.  I'm sorry to say that the MGM documentary did not make me want to explore any more beyond what was shown.  An all opera musical? Yuck.  I like musicals too; but I can't handle opera. 

 

Someone else mentioned Howard Keel.  Unfortunately, I must agree.  I am not much for men's voices that are loud, baritone and semi-operatic.  The name Howard Keel does not do much to attract me to watching a film.  For whatever reason, I do enjoy "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" though.  I don't know why.  Keel appeared in the film "Kiss Me Kate" with Ann Miller and Kathryn Grayson...

 

Which brings me to my next "thing" I dislike:

 

Kathryn Grayson.  I cannot stand her singing voice.  Too shrill, too operatic, just ugh!  In "Anchors Aweigh," I love Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Jerry the Mouse, the dancing, songs, even little Dean Stockwell... but I cannot get behind Kathryn Grayson.  When she sings, I fast forward.  I cannot stand her voice.  Unfortuantely, while watching a couple of other movie musicals, I have been ambushed by her a couple times when I was unaware that she was in the film. 

 

 

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Tom Hooper's disgrace of a musical Les Miserables. I'm sure a whole lot of people feel the same way but this did make a load of money and it does have a very vocal fan base. It must be the songs that hypnotize; otherwise, it is terribly conceived and executed by Hooper on every level.

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Wow lots of interesting responses!

 

Andy, you rattled off so many genres, your classic film viewing must be narrow.

 

I agree with most of Clore's choices, especially Preston Sturges, whom I've tried to like, but there's always just an element missing to make it "work". They're not bad, just not great. Almost exactly how I feel about Coen Bros. 

 

At least the Coen Bros TRY to make interesting innovative films, even if some fail overall. And at least they're not making comic book hero movies-yuk.

 

Which brings me to John Ford. I can't stand his movies, mostly because of his directorial choices-he invariably makes opposite composition choices than you would expect. That really ruins the story flow for me.

I wonder if he was "innovative" or just completely misses the mark?

In any case, THE QUIET MAN is the only Ford movie with strong enough story & actors for me to enjoy it despite the klunky direction.

 

WUTHERING HEIGHTS - Two hours of "I love you, I hate you, I love you, I hate you."

 

That was pretty much our reaction watching it too.

 

 

HoldenIsHere said : FORREST GUMP (in fact most any movie with Tom Hanks)

 

Finally. A kindred spirit. Someone else who sees through this actor impostor.

 

A few of you mentioned disliking singers: Howard Keel, Jeanette MacDonald & Katherine Grayson. I think singers is akin to comedians-a tough "sell" you either buy them or you don't. 

 

Also quite a few mentioned CITIZEN KANE, GUESS WHOS COMING TO DINNER, THE GRADUATE.

 

I think some movies are tied to age & time. GWCTD is very dated in that taboo of interracial marriage is such a thing of the past, it's not even understandable by anyone under 30. A curio.

Although I always enjoy pre-women's lib movies, "You're not going to drive yourself?" 

 

THE GRADUATE appeals to that same under 30 crowd, I think once you grow up and are into the adult world, it just seems like a implausible story. Also a film of it's "time", the 60's.

 

And CITIZEN KANE alludes many of that same age group. I think it has much more impact on those who have been around the block a few times.

 

So I'm a lover of KANE, BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI and some others mentioned here. But I wholly understand why many don't like them.

Hey, I love 2001 A SPACY ODYSSEY & THE SHINING, two movies most people don't "get" at all.

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So many wonderful dislikes. FINALLY! The freedom to hate.

 

This is perhaps my favorite line in the entire thread:

 

I'd rather watch Hitler do a jig with Lady Godiva's horse at halftime in the Super Bowl (which admittedly would be an improvement over the usual Super Bowl halftime entertainment) than to sit through another minute of Howard Keel's baritone bleeting.

 

Excellent, kudos to you Andy.

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HoldenIsHere said : FORREST GUMP (in fact most any movie with Tom Hanks)
Finally. A kindred spirit. Someone else who sees through this actor impostor.

 

 

At one message board I go to, populated mostly by college students and 20-somethings, there was a recent thread entitled "Is Tom Hanks the greatest actor of all time?". Many responses said yes, and IIRC none suggested it was not a legitimate question.

 

I think some movies are tied to age & time. GWCTD is very dated in that taboo of interracial marriage is such a thing of the past, it's not even understandable by anyone under 30. A curio.

 

 

This was seen as old-fashioned liberal do-goodery even at the time. Perhaps by going to see it people felt they were making some sort of civil rights statement.

 

CITIZEN KANE alludes many of that same age group. I think it has much more impact on those who have been around the block a few times.

 

A lot of the anti-Kane feeling comes from its GOAT ("greatest of all time", for you non-sports fans) rep. Sort of the same butcher-sacred-cows motivation that makes rock fans "hate" The Beatles, or makes me hate Seinfeld (the world's most overrated TV show).

 

 

THE GRADUATE appeals to that same under 30 crowd, I think once you grow up and are into the adult world, it just seems like a implausible story. Also a film of it's "time", the 60's.

 

I can understand why Bonnie and Clyde was hit. I can understand why In The Heat Of The Night was a hit. I can even almost understand why GWCTD was a hit. But The Graduate mystifies me. What was it about this film that struck such a chord? It isn't anywhere near as funny as the Universal sex comedies of the early '60s -- in fact most of the supporting cast is wasted. The hero isn't a rebel, but just a blank. Did it touch on some sort of Oedipal issue?

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:D

 

Sorry folks, but I found Jlewis' take here on these films so cleverly written that I just HAD to use the quote button and "play it again, Sam"!

 

 

Awww... thanks. I do worry, though, that my cerebral sense of humor gets too... cerebral at times.

 

 

One of my favorite stories my grandmother used to tell was about "The Wizard of Oz".    My grandparents lived about an hour outside of New York City and if they wanted to see a film they had to go into NYC to see it.   They decided to go see "The Wizard of Oz" when it came out.    So one Saturday night off they go to NYC.  They get seated and the movie starts.  Everything is great until it changes to color and the munchkins make their grand entrance.  They look at each other and say "what the heck is this" and walk out.     She told me when it came on tv, many decades later, they did eventually see it through to the end.  She was still not a fan  :)

 

I've heard/read a lot of stories like this. The film was somewhat of a box office bomb during its first year of release, apart from its music being popular at the time. Basically many saw it as MGM trying to cash in on Disney's Snow White with a "live-action" big budget fantasy in color, much like Paramount with Fleischer's animated Gulliver's Travels and 20th Century Fox with The Blue Bird (i.e. Shirley Temple was initially supposed to be going to Oz). Folks in '39 just didn't "get" it. It was color TV that made it popular, much like NBC's Bonanza.

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I've heard/read a lot of stories like this. The film was somewhat of a box office bomb during its first year of release, apart from its music being popular at the time. Basically many saw it as MGM trying to cash in on Disney's Snow White with a "live-action" big budget fantasy in color, much like Paramount with Fleischer's animated Gulliver's Travels and 20th Century Fox with The Blue Bird (i.e. Shirley Temple was initially supposed to be going to Oz). Folks in '39 just didn't "get" it.

 

A lot of people went to see it, just not enough to offset its enormous production cost.

 

It was color TV that made it popular, much like NBC's Bonanza.

 

There is some truth to the claim that WOO was "manufactured" into a classic by its annual airing, similar to what TNT did more blatantly -- but apparently quite successfully -- with A Christmas Story.

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I can understand why Bonnie and Clyde was hit. I can understand why In The Heat Of The Night was a hit. I can even almost understand why GWCTD was a hit. But The Graduate mystifies me. What was it about this film that struck such a chord? It isn't anywhere near as funny as the Universal sex comedies of the early '60s -- in fact most of the supporting cast is wasted. The hero isn't a rebel, but just a blank. Did it touch on some sort of Oedipal issue?

 

I can't stand The Graduate, either, but movies of that era that portrayed the older generation as clueless and "plastic" were always going to meet with approval from the twentysomethings of the time, no matter how vapid the protagonist.  Add on the Lubyanka-level torture of that Simon and Garfunkel soundtrack, which if anything is even worse the film itself, if that's possible, and you've got a perfect cinematic storm to separate the eternal flower children from those who like their generational pandering to be a bit more subtle.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------

 

Andy, you rattled off so many genres, your classic film viewing must be narrow.

 

These are a few of my favorite things:  Silents; pre-codes; gangster / mob movies; noirs; serious dramas set in the present, minus costumes; many screwballs and other comedies; honestly sentimental movies (Stella Dallas, A Man to Remember, etc.); war movies that go beyond elaborate battle scenes;  about a dozen musicals (the 3 Berkeleys from 1933, both versions of A Star Is Born, My Fair Lady, Guys and Dolls, etc.); movies that deal realistically with social, racial and political issues; whodunits, especially the B-movie variety (Boston B l a c k i e; Torchy Blane, etc.).  All of the above can be in any language on Earth, provided the foreign ones have readable subtitles. 

 

And then there are 90% of the studio era movies set in the present* featuring  Barbara Stanwyck, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Ida Lupino, Dana Andrews, Louis Calhern, Glenn Ford,  Robert Ryan, William Powell and Myrna Loy, Warren William, Lionel Barrymore,  Clark Gable, Marlene Dietrich, Rita Hayworth,  Richard Widmark, James Stewart, Cagney / Bogart / Robinson, Ray Milland, Edward Arnold, Rosalind Russell, Charles Coburn, and many others too numerous to mention. The fact that I've got about 4000 movies (mostly from TCM) and enjoyed the great majority of them should tell you that there are more than enough categories of films around here for everyone to love.

 

*That's the real dividing line for me.  I can think of virtually no movie set more than a few years in the past that I really enjoy.  There may be about two dozen or so exceptions at most (mostly post-1970 mob movies), and few of them would make my top 100.

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