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Movie you love that everyone else can't stand


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Thought I'd keep the hyperbole of the original thread

 

Whys and wherefores welcome

 

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The Oscar

 

How To Commit Marriage, Skidoo, and pretty much any movie where Old Hollywood tries to understand hippies

 

The Green Slime

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I have a great affection for late '60s/early '70s movies (both theatrical and TV) with scenes set in the bars of country clubs, with 50 year old Hefner wannabes with short hair and sideburns in turtlenecks and plaid pants, listening to bossa nova and swilling martinis after playing 18 holes.

 

I consider Banning (1967) to be the masterpiece of this sub-sub-genre.

 

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I have a great affection for late '60s/early '70s movies (both theatrical and TV) with scenes set in the bars of country clubs, with 50 year old Hefner wannabes with short hair and sideburns in turtlenecks and plaid pants, listening to bossa nova and swilling martinis after playing 18 holes.

 

I consider Banning (1967) to be the masterpiece of this sub-sub-genre.

I'll bet it's been over forty years since I last saw Banning. I thought I was the only person to have ever seen this movie, let alone liked it. Thanks for dredging that one up!

 

Robert Wagner was just beginning his new 1968 tv series, It Takes a Thief - a good start to a good career, eh?

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Then I'm gonna go out on a limb here RK, and guess you also probably like "Where It's At"(1969) starring our boy David Janssen as a Vegas casino boss during that era, and featuring a storyline with overtones of the conflict between the Rat Pack/"Mad Men" vs the Counterculture generations.

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Then I'm gonna go out on a limb here RK, and guess you also probably like "Where It's At"(1969) starring our boy David Janssen as a Vegas casino boss during that era, and featuring a storyline with overtones of the conflict between the Rat Pack/"Mad Men" vs the Counterculture generations.

 

I've only seen WIA once, in part, at least three decades ago. It didn't even work for me on a camp level. Casting deadly serious, vaguely creepy and in any case overage Robert Drivas as the juvenile was a mistake that could not be overcome.

 

As for Janssen, he showed a light comedy touch on Richard Diamond, but here he was ill-served by Garson Kanin's direction.

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I've only seen WIA once, in part, at least three decades ago. It didn't even work for me on a camp level. Casting deadly serious, vaguely creepy and in any case overage Robert Drivas as the juvenile was a mistake that could not be overcome.

 

 

LOL Yeah, "vaguely creepy" is a great definition for Drivas in just about everything he was ever in, alright! 

 

 

As for Janssen, he showed a light comedy touch on Richard Diamond, but here he was ill-served by Garson Kanin's direction. 

 

Yeah, while I think Janssen was well-cast as the casino boss, I too think Kanin couldn't make up his mind about what kind of film he wanted to make here. It might have been much better if he would have gone for more of a farce, such as say, "The Loved One".

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ATTACK OF THE KILLER TOMATOES.  People from all walks panned this movie.  But for me, it worked as a send-up of cheaply produced, poorly executed sci-fi flicks.  That people off camera were obviously rolling various sized tomatoes( I think a few were actually "dressed up" beach and "Cinese soccer" balls!) at the "victims" made it all the more hilarious to me. 

 

There was one scene in which all the miltary and scientific leaders of the world were having a meeting.  the meeting room was filled with a confrerence table so large, that how they got it into the room is a mystery.  People had to crawl over it to get in their seats.  At one point, a foriegn scientist tries to disuede the use of vegetation killers because, "...As we all know, tomatoes are technically f a g s."  One guy turns to the man next to him and clarifies, "He means fruits."  At the end of the meeting, an army general invites the group to a test field to view the testing of a substance that might eradicate the tomatoes, and advises all to "Wear a jacket, because there seems to be a j a p in the air".  The same guy turns to the Japanese scientist sitting next to him and says, "He means nip."

 

Even the humor is fittingly lowbrow.

 

Sepiatone

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The Astounding She Monster (1957)

 

Transfixed by that movie at the age of 7 - she appeared in dreams every year or so till the age of about 14. Still watch it once in a while.

Who, Kim Novak looks like in VERTIGO

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   Been anticipating this topic.

   First is a clunker from 1963 titled "Kings of the Sun". Yul Brynner is an American Indian - sorry, I don't know if the tribe was ever specified. George Chakiris, Shirley Anne Field, Richard Baseheart, Leo Gordon and Brad Dexter are Mayans! Despite, or because of the casting, I just pop open a beer and soak this one up. Perhaps the beer is the problem.

   Another is from the same year, Ralph Nelson's "Soldier in the Rain". It stars Steve McQueen (advertised as the Great Escape Guy) and Jackie Gleason (the Great One) and features Tuesday Weld, Tom Poston, Adam West and Tony Bill. It's supposed to be a wacky military comedy until it turns dark and has a really nasty bar room brawl tossed in. McQueen (rightly) later dissed his own performance but I find it charming and it reminds me of my own service time.

   Most of my fellow fans mock me for wasting my time rewatching these turkeys, but just writing about them makes me want to see them again, or maybe I just want another beer.

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RK, I like The Green Slime too. Other films others don't like, that I do:

 

Heaven's Gate

Waterworld

The Postman

Death to Smoochy

The Legend of Lylah Clare

 

I know there are a lot more, I'll add more when I think of them.

 

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I like the following films which are bad to many.

 

"Mac and Me" (1988)....I think he's vulcanized how much he bounces around.  E.T. ripoff??..hardly (no mom and dad)

 

mac2.jpg

 

 

 

"The Swarm" (1978)...lol even got the soundtrack LP

 

El+Enjambre+-+The+Swarm+-+Irwin+Allen+.+

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I have a ton of not-so-guilty-pleasures.  Films that aren't typically renowned as great cinematic masterpieces or films that aren't even known for being that great; however, they entertain me for whatever reason, whether it be the "they're so bad they're good" factor, the campiness, nostalgia, etc-- they're definitely not high brow choices. 

 

I love the 80s, 90s and early 00s teen comedies-- they're nostalgic for me.  Many people here aren't in the same age bracket as I am, so nostalgia for these films probably isn't common here.  My childhood was the late 80s-early 00s, just as a reference for this list.

 

-Clueless

-10 Things I Hate About You

-Bring it On (only the first one)

-She's All That

-Sixteen Candles

-Pretty in Pink

-Fast Times at Ridgemont High

-Valley Girl

-Mean Girls

-Heathers

 

The "so bad, they're good" category

-UHF 

-Reefer Madness (the 1930s one)

-Encino Man

-Mannequin

-Weekend at Bernies

-Plan 9 From Outer Space

 

The 80s dancing movies

-Footloose

-Flashdance

-Dirty Dancing

 

Other movies

-The Brady Bunch Movie

-A Very Brady Sequel

-Cry Baby

-Love Actually

-Dumb and Dumber

-Titanic*

 

* "Titanic" holds more of a nostalgia value for me.  I saw it opening day back in middle school with a bunch of my friends.  While the movie is way too sappy, I enjoy it.  

 

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I haven't seen too many movies on your list, but I loved Heathers, and I've yet to meet a single person who doesn't like (or love) Reefer Madness.  Along with Pink Flamingos and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, that was one of wildly popular perennials of the "midnight movies" phenomenon of the 70's, and probably attracted far more actual viewers than most of the mainstream first run releases of that era.

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I have to confess to a soft spot for "Glitter" (2001), the Mariah Carey opus in the great tradition of Diana Ross' "Mahogany". Total vanity project, which is usually a great set-up, watching someone blow smoke up their own ... At the time Mariah was telling interviewers that the "concept" was hers, which I guess answers the question "What was she thinking?" We've seen it all before in one form or another, but the earnestness in which these tales get told only adds to the fun. Young Mariah becomes a ward of the state after her mother accidentally burns down the house and mere seconds after walking in the door of her new institutional home she meets her future girl group. Years later they try to make it big, but Mariah gets culled out of the herd by a Nicky Arnstein-like DJ/producer/would-be impressario who forsees superstardom for her as a solo. It's a wonder nobody ever thought of a plot like that before. Really changes the face of cinema, doesn't it? Anyway, I rushed to the theater when this came out and it didn't disappoint me then and it doesn't today.

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-Titanic*

 

* "Titanic" holds more of a nostalgia value for me.  I saw it opening day back in middle school with a bunch of my friends.  While the movie is way too sappy, I enjoy it.  

Pretty sure TITANIC didn't make the top money-makers list because most people didn't like it.  It is an enormously popular film.  I didn't care much for it, until I saw it in 3D.  It plays far better in 3D than it does in 2D.

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RK, I like The Green Slime too.

 

I don't imbibe, but those who do can play a drinking game by taking a swig every time Robert Horton says, "That's an order mister!"

 

And an asteroid might destroy Earth, but could it really dent Robert Horton's hair?

 

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@Speedracer:  Most of those movies( well, ALL of them, actually) have enjoyed much box office or cult success.  And are, for many, STILL held in high regard.

 

So, WHICH movie(s) did you LOVE that everyone ELSE couldn't stand?

 

Sepiatone

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Thought I'd keep the hyperbole of the original thread

 

Whys and wherefores welcome

 

----------

 

The Oscar

 

How To Commit Marriage, Skidoo, and pretty much any movie where Old Hollywood tries to understand hippies

 

The Green Slime

I watched The Oscar last week on GET TV and it immediately goes to the top of that list. HEAD is up there along with both Herman's Hermits films. I also really enjoy Mexican horror films featuring Abel Salazar, but I haven't seen those in decades.

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It is for me more of an area rather than specific movies. Most of the movies which are my favorites are foreign movies. 

 

I believe that the reason for it is that I had the privilege from a very young age to watch movies from many countries. My concerns for movies were in order: is it available and what is the genre. I would watch any movie of any genre in any language rather than watch no movie. I would watch a crime comedy in a language which I did not know rather than watch a drama in a language which I did know. 

 
It is also that my second husband was an expert in Japanese Cinema and so I was exposed to the spectrum of their movies. I learned the symbolisms which inform their movies and so I appreciate well the moments of delicacy and the intensity of despair. I find comfort with Yasujirô Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi and Mikio Naruse as many people do with John Ford, Frank Capra and Elia Kazan. 
 
I do love American movies. I truly do. I learned to understand English because I loved American movies even before I knew what all were saying. American movies have been important to me during all stages of my life.
 
I prefer Japanese dramas over American melondramas because they generally depict true oppression rather than concentrating on whiny people who are upset when they can not have their way.
 
I prefer Japanese horror because Western horror relies on shock value and intellectual fears while Japanese is more visceral and preys on primal fears. My common reaction to most Western horror is to say: "that is scary." My common reaction to much Japanese horror is to feel my intestines wrapping around my spine as I seek to hide. This is in particular true for their ghost stories.
 
I prefer Soviet war movies over Western war movies because I find them more realistic and more personal. This is in particular true of movies set in WWII. I believe this may be because Western experience was small when compared to Soviet experience. The war for most of the West was to send soldiers to foreign soil. The war for Soviet was soldiers and housewives and children fighting at their homes. 
 
It is also that I prefer in general British comedy over American comedy because the British are masters at exploiting absurdities. 
 
I find that in general there is grudging acceptance only of foreign movies by many.
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