Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Movie you love that everyone else can't stand


Recommended Posts

@gorch:  One of the factors that made me love old movies was that when I was 14-15 years old, in the summer, I would stay up and watch the "Late,Late" show on a local channel on the TV we had in the basement, while everyone else was asleep.  They would show a variety of old movies, some classic, some not so hot.  SOLDIER IN THE RAIN, which I considered to be somewhere in the middle, was one they showed frequently.  I always loved it, and since it was a favorite in my youth, I suppose it has much sentimental value in my old age.  At first, you get the sense that Gleason's Slaughter takes shameless advantage of McQueen's Eustis Clay, as the not too bright Clay looks up to the far more intelligent Slaughter.  But then you realize that everytime Clay gets into trouble, Slaughter shows up to help him out of it.  You also realize that in spite of Slaughter's bold faced circumventing of the army's regulations and protocol, he is in a steadfast and dedicated "marriage" to the army.  And he's obviously someone you don't want to mess with.  Even the MPs are wary of him.  And his relationship with the high school girl Tuesday Weld plays is one of the more touching and honest in film.

 

On Leonardo DiCaprio:  My wife and I became "enamored" with DiCaprio since his appearance as a mentally challenged kid in "WHAT'S EATING GILBERT GRAPE".  We ACTUALLY THOUGHT they got some mentally challenged kid to play the part, he was so convincing!  But I've never heard anybody say they didn't like THE WOLF OF WALL STREET.  I heard many say they shuddered at the language and some of the more sexually explicit scenes, but overall, they liked the movie.  There so far doesn't seem to be a role out of range for DiCaprio, and I find myself likening him more to PAUL MUNI than Brando.

 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sepiatone, I was 14 in 1963 when I saw Soldier in the theater. I agree that the relationship between Slaughter and Bobbie Jo is a highlight of the story. The exchange between them on their first date is priceless. Slaughter - "And what did you learn in school today, little girl?". Bobbie Jo - "Donna Mae Parker's gonna have a baby".

 

I also enjoy when she calls him a fat Randolph Scott.

 

And here I thought I was the only person who remembered this one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've gotten all mixed up with this thread and its doppelganger. I inadvertently posted this comment in the sister thread, when it really belongs more over here, since it's about a movie that I liked a lot but hardly anyone else did. So I "imported" the post to this thread. It's in response to a comment LonesomePolecat made about how she's unimpressed with Leonardo DiCaprio:

 

What a coincidence -- my I Hate Titanic post in the sister thread was in response to some people who loved Titanic in THIS thread.

 

Anyway back to this thread.

 

I wouldn't say no one else likes it but one of my all time favorites has never been considered a "great" movie, and people seem shocked that it's one of my all time favorites:

LILI

Can't even tell you how happy it makes me. Love the story, the cast, the puppets, the magic tricks, the two dance numbers, the title song, I don't know, I just love it--and I don't even like the circus. Leslie Caron is so believable and it just makes me happy.

2409536,8n9yKHpUMSQKT4r2B7LCh3cH2ELvkoXZ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two that came to mind and may not be in the "everyone else can't stand them" category, as they do have their fans, as well as their detractors: "New York, New York" and "Blue Velvet" both of which I recall I loved when I saw them in theatres, while on both occasions my companions most vehemently did not!

 

Re: "Suspiria" I saw it for the first time last year - found a used VHS copy at a video store- It was certainly stylish - too bad that it eventually went off the rails.

 

Re: those '80's "teen comedies" - I think these movies are not to be sneered at - most of these are good, entertaining movies (though I personally loathe "Flashdance").

Link to post
Share on other sites

On Leonardo DiCaprio:   There so far doesn't seem to be a role out of range for DiCaprio, and I find myself likening him more to PAUL MUNI than Brando.

 

Sepiatone

I have never thought of the comparison with Muni.   I think that is a good observation, although DiCaprio doesn't make me forget I am watching DiCaprio. Muni made me forget I was Muni.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Vertigo:  Most of those '80's teen movies, while not being cinematic gems, are a mindless, entertaining way to pass the time.  Mostly those John Hughes entries, THE BREAKFAST CLUB, SIXTEEN CANDLES, PRETTY IN PINK and such.  I used to call them "MTV movies" because their soundtrack songs and videos saturated MTV at the time.

 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a coincidence -- my I Hate Titanic post in the sister thread was in response to some people who loved Titanic in THIS thread.

 

Anyway back to this thread.

 

I wouldn't say no one else likes it but one of my all time favorites has never been considered a "great" movie, and people seem shocked that it's one of my all time favorites:

LILI

Can't even tell you how happy it makes me. Love the story, the cast, the puppets, the magic tricks, the two dance numbers, the title song, I don't know, I just love it--and I don't even like the circus. Leslie Caron is so believable and it just makes me happy.

2409536,8n9yKHpUMSQKT4r2B7LCh3cH2ELvkoXZ

I much preferred the show CARNIVAL, which was based on this story  Sadly, they never made a film of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ValentineX said: DEATH TO SMOOCHY

 

Funny story about that film:

I was dating a guy who was in the Hollywood North film industry. He said I needed to come up and watch the making of a film in the works- a musical with Robin Williams. Jaded as I was at the time, I never came up to see it being made. (nor CHICAGO, which he also said I would enjoy)

 

Later he said the entire industry was laughing at how utterly horrible this film ended up becoming. He would not let me see any rough cut videos. Later, even Jon Stewart made fun of his appearance in the "worst movie ever made".

 

Several years later, I see DEATH TO SMOOCHY in a cheapie bin, so I bought it on a whim. I loved it! I thought no one really understood it was really a black comedy. I've watched it several times since, even MrTiki and the Kid loved it.

It's supposed to be kind of goofy story wise. The acting is superb-love Kathleen Keener especially but all supporting actors are well known Canadian pros. My only beef is the language.

 

But I love that it's the story of a goodie two shoes politically correct guy that succeeds in a corrupt world. The scene where he gets his new Smoochy suit playing to a Yma Sumac song and putting black organic ketchup on his Nathan's Hot Dog are priceless.

 

Death to Smootchy would have to go in my list of movies other people hate that I love too. I also liked The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, even though it felt like a good idea gone wrong. I don;t know if anyone is familiar with it, but it features Sean Connery as Alan Quatermain, leading a host of literary anti-heros (like Capn Nemo and Mina Harker) against Dr Moriarty and his war machines of doom. I think it may have been a graphic novel first? 

 

Someone also mentioned the Brady Bunch movies. I used to love that show as a kid and later as an adult, I loved laughing at it. When I went to see the movie,  I laughed for 10 minutes straight when I saw they built an entire movie around the horse statue. All I could think was, "D*mn. How many hours did they need to watch before they noticed that the horse is in nearly every episode?" 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also liked The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, even though it felt like a good idea gone wrong. I don;t know if anyone is familiar with it, but it features Sean Connery as Alan Quatermain, leading a host of literary anti-heros (like Capn Nemo and Mina Harker) against Dr Moriarty and his war machines of doom. I think it may have been a graphic novel first? 

 

Well, ya know tracey, Steampunk IS so last year now...and only the really un-cool kids are still into it.  ;)

 

Gotta admit however that I recently watched this flick on TV, and afterward couldn't understand why the critics ravaged it so unmercifully. It wasn't all that bad in my book, either. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1984's "rock and roll fable" (that's more rock than roll) Streets of Fire. It's bombastic, sexist, over-the-top and occasionally silly. But it takes itself completely seriously and I love it for that and for a powerhouse soundtrack that features songs by Jim Steinman (Meatloaf), Stevie Nicks, Tom Petty and Ry Cooder. Okay, so Diane Lane lip-syncs to at least three different voices and Rick Moranis was badly miscast and Michael Pare sounds like his dialogue was dubbed by someone whose first language was not English and Willem Dafoe looks like Bob's Big Boy gone bad and in the end, violence is the answer, but there's something here of the classic Hollywood Western. It's High Noon in a rock-and-roll comic book format. My favorite guilty pleasure next to The Greatest Show on Earth.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dargo, I have no trouble preferring The English Patient to most other 1996 movies, including Fargo.  Alan Parker is not a renowned director and many people will never, quite understandably, forgive him for Mississippi Burning.  But Angel Heart and Pink Floyd:  the Wall are too of my very favorite movies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

   Well, I thought of another extravaganza that would make most sane people flee in horror but that I enjoy. It's another self-basted turkey from 1962 by the redoubtable director J. Lee Thompson and (as in Kings of the Sun) starring Yul Brynner and featuring Brad Dexter.

   This one is Taras Bulba and although it's meant to be taken seriously, it's instantly subverted by casting an over-aged Tony Curtis as Brynner's young son. The blue screen inserts are appalling, the dialogue is ripe and Argentinia is supposed to be the Ukrainian steppes. The uplifting finale revels in the heroic Cossacks sabering the Polish Cavalry into a crevass.

   So why do I own it and watch it every few years? Probably because I have severe daddy issues, but I like the photography, Franz Waxman's rousing score, supporting players Sam Wanamaker, Mickey Finn, Vladimir Sokoloff, Perry Lopez, George Macready and Guy Wolfe.

   This was supposed to be UA's big Christmas epic that year. It wasn't.

   Are there any other defenders out there?

Link to post
Share on other sites

   Well, I thought of another extravaganza that would make most sane people flee in horror but that I enjoy. It's another self-basted turkey from 1962 by the redoubtable director J. Lee Thompson and (as in Kings of the Sun) starring Yul Brynner and featuring Brad Dexter.

   This one is Taras Bulba and although it's meant to be taken seriously, it's instantly subverted by casting an over-aged Tony Curtis as Brynner's young son. The blue screen inserts are appalling, the dialogue is ripe and Argentinia is supposed to be the Ukrainian steppes. The uplifting finale revels in the heroic Cossacks sabering the Polish Cavalry into a crevass.

   So why do I own it and watch it every few years? Probably because I have severe daddy issues, but I like the photography, Franz Waxman's rousing score, supporting players Sam Wanamaker, Mickey Finn, Vladimir Sokoloff, Perry Lopez, George Macready and Guy Wolfe.

   This was supposed to be UA's big Christmas epic that year. It wasn't.

   Are there any other defenders out there?

 

It's not a bad sword and sandal actioner. I haven't seen it in ages, but as I recall its big flaw was a dull romance that stopped the story dead every few minutes.

 

Doesn't it have a scene where you can briefly see Tony Curtis' hairpiece come off?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard, if Curtis' hairpiece flies off, I would not be surprised, but I never caught it. I do know that John Wayne's rug flops back onto his noggin in North To Alaska during the first saloon brawl.

 

Glad to find another soul who admits to giving this one a modicum of praise.

 

When my son was about 20 years old, he and some friends stumbled in while this movie had just started. They were (appropriately) incredulous until Andrei was caught and shot by his old man. It's now 15 years later and they all still remember the movie.

 

I read someplace that Yul was supposed to sing at least four more songs. It could have turned into "Taras and I".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dargo, I have no trouble preferring The English Patient to most other 1996 movies, including Fargo.  Alan Parker is not a renowned director and many people will never, quite understandably, forgive him for Mississippi Burning.  But Angel Heart and Pink Floyd:  the Wall are too of my very favorite movies.

I've tried looking down the thread, but I can't  find whether Dargo likes FARGO. Does Dargo like STRANGE CARGO?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tracy, I love SOUND OF MUSIC too. Extremely popular movies get a bad rap from people who get sick of hearing about them or who just want to be different, but I still love this one myself. Mostly because Julie and Chris are so great in it and Robert Wise is one of my favorite directors. Plus that Ernest Lehman screenplay is so much better than the libretto of the stage play, but that's SOP for Ernest Lehman.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...