Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Trivia for the other 98% of us


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, MilesArcher said:

A well known character actress played the wife of Lionel Barrymore's character in a movie.  A year or so later they were both in a totally unrelated movie and this time she played his daughter.   Who is the actress and what were the two movies?  Both movies have been shown on TCM.   

"A Family Affair"  (1937 ) was the first Andy Hardy film with Lionel Barrymore playing Judge Hardy and Spring Byington playing his wife at MGM.

In 1938 at Columbia, Frank Capra's "You Can't Take It With You"  featured Lionel Barrymore as the grandfather and Spring Byington as his daughter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work, ladies.  Princess and Starlit both got it.  In 1938, when they made "You Can't take It With You", Lionel was sixty, Spring, playing his daughter, was fifty-two.   Jean Arthur, playing Spring's daughter, and Lionel's granddaughter, was thirty-eight.  

Princess got it first, so Princess gets to go next.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This director was one of the most successful directors of musicals from the Golden Age of Hollywood. He even won an Oscar for one of his musical movies.

Yet not that many people associate him with being a musical director.

His success at directing musicals has gone through several decades at a major studio.

He started in silent films and worked to the early 60s.

 In addition to musicals, he also had great success with romantic comedies, which starred Hollywood Legends like, Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn, Susan Hayward and Myrna Loy.

When you identify this director, also give us one of his popular musicals and one of his funny romantic comedies.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2020 at 8:09 PM, Princess of Tap said:

This director was one of the most successful directors of musicals from the Golden Age of Hollywood. He even won an Oscar for one of his musical movies.

Yet not that many people associate him with being a musical director.

His success at directing musicals has gone through several decades at a major studio.

He started in silent films and worked to the early 60s.

 In addition to musicals, he also had great success with romantic comedies, which starred Hollywood Legends like, Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn, Susan Hayward and Myrna Loy.

When you identify this director, also give us one of his popular musicals and one of his funny romantic comedies.

Hint: His wife was best friends with a top Hollywood actress, as both had been Mack Sennett Bathing Beauties.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Princess, I think you're missing the point of this thread.  "Trivia For The Other 98% Of Us" is supposed to be the easy stuff that most people would know.  This one is anything but easy.  

My answer is Walter Lang.  He married actress Madalynne Field, a former Mack Sennett bathing beauty who was a good friend of Carole Lombard, also a former Sennett gal.  Field became Lombard's secretary.  She was referred to as "Fieldsie".  Lang was directing Lombard in "Love Before Breakfast" when Field visited the set.  They were married a year later.  Let's see, he directed Myrna Loy in "Cheaper By The Dozen", Clark Gable in "But Not For Me", Tracy and Hepburn in "Desk Set", Susan Hayward in "With A Song In My Heart", and Frank Sinatra in "Can-Can".  Most of his career was spent at Twentieth Century Fox where he directed several musicals in the early forties like "Tin Pan Alley", "Moon Over Miami", and "Coney Island" with stars like Alice Faye and Betty Grable.  Later he directed "Call Me Madam", "There's No Business Like Show Business", and "The King And I".

Modern Screen,' May 1934: The height of fear, and so much more:  carole_and_co — LiveJournal

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, MilesArcher said:

Princess, I think you're missing the point of this thread.  "Trivia For The Other 98% Of Us" is supposed to be the easy stuff that most people would know.  This one is anything but easy.  

My answer is Walter Lang.  He married actress Madalynne Field, a former Mack Sennett bathing beauty who was a good friend of Carole Lombard, also a former Sennett gal.  Field became Lombard's secretary.  She was referred to as "Fieldsie".  Lang was directing Lombard in "Love Before Breakfast" when Field visited the set.  They were married a year later.  Let's see, he directed Myrna Loy in "Cheaper By The Dozen", Clark Gable in "But Not For Me", Tracy and Hepburn in "Desk Set", Susan Hayward in "With A Song In My Heart", and Frank Sinatra in "Can-Can".  Most of his career was spent at Twentieth Century Fox where he directed several musicals in the early forties like "Tin Pan Alley", "Moon Over Miami", and "Coney Island" with stars like Alice Faye and Betty Grable.  Later he directed "Call Me Madam", "There's No Business Like Show Business", and "The King And I".

Modern Screen,' May 1934: The height of fear, and so much more:  carole_and_co — LiveJournal

 

So sorry, I gave so many hints that I thought it was rather easy.

But Miles you never let me down.:)

Your turn.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, MIles, for that wonderful memory of Ann Blyth.  I saw her in a production of "New Moon" ( probably in the 1970's ) and it was such a thrill to hear her in person.  Now, on to the next question:

This actress almost did not have much of a career.  Her first movie was such an unhappy experience that she really did not want to continue making movies.  Then she was loaned out to another studio  and it turned out to be a really pleasant time.  The movie in question was a comedy and the atmosphere was so light and enjoyable that she changed her mind about having a future in Hollywood.   Her main objections with her first movie were an inept director and a needlessly long  shooting schedule.   Name the actress and the two movies mentioned.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/4/2020 at 6:49 PM, Terrence1 said:

Thanks, MIles, for that wonderful memory of Ann Blyth.  I saw her in a production of "New Moon" ( probably in the 1970's ) and it was such a thrill to hear her in person.  Now, on to the next question:

This actress almost did not have much of a career.  Her first movie was such an unhappy experience that she really did not want to continue making movies.  Then she was loaned out to another studio  and it turned out to be a really pleasant time.  The movie in question was a comedy and the atmosphere was so light and enjoyable that she changed her mind about having a future in Hollywood.   Her main objections with her first movie were an inept director and a needlessly long  shooting schedule.   Name the actress and the two movies mentioned.

 

 Terrence whenever you have time, can you give us a hint?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I've done it again!  I seem to have a knack for posing questions that are too difficult.  Sorry.  The actress in question was Jane Russell, who had such a difficult time while making "The Outlaw", mainly because Howard Hughes saw  himself as a director, and it turned out that he really did not know what he was doing.  Fortunately, "The Paleface" came along to show her how much fun could be had making a movie.  OK.  This is open.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Google says... He was Waldo's father (where is Waldo) .

Judy Holliday won an Oscar for playing Billie Dawn in Born Yesterday; however, she wasn't originally slated for the role (on stage).  Which actress was and what was the reason she/others gave for her deciding not to do the show?  Bonus points for knowing who played Broderick Crawford's role and William Holden's role on stage.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't take long for a thread to slip all the way to page three, which is where I found this question.

When the movie was shown on TCM, Ben told us that the role played by Broderick Crawford had been played on stage by Paul Douglas.  The William Holden role was played on stage by Gary Merrill.   Of course, Judy Holliday played Billie Dawn on stage, but the actress who was supposed to play the role was Jean Arthur.  I don't know the reason that Jean gave for dropping out, but it was well known that she suffered from a severe case of stage fright throughout her career.  The nervousness and anxiety sometimes became so bad that she would become physically sick.  Film makers could sometimes get around the problem by making several takes for a scene, but that isn't possible for a stage show.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...