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Trivia for the other 98% of us


Kid Dabb
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3 minutes ago, MilesArcher said:

They were made of plaster.  That's right, plaster.  After the war, the Academy invited recipients of the plaster statuettes to redeem them for the gold-plated versions.

 

That's it.  Well done, Miles!  I wonder if any of those plaster statues still exist somewhere?  

Your thread...

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The Oscar name has a few theories.  Margaret Herrick, Academy Award librarian, said it looked like her Uncle Oscar.  Columnist Sydney Skosky claimed to have coined it after a vaudeville joke. Bette Davis said that Oscar's bottom reminded her of her husband's.

The Emmy was named after the orthicon tube of a tv camera.  It was changed from "Immy" to "Emmy" to sound more like a name belonging to the woman of the statue.

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17 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Eugene O'Neill

That's a great guess but it's not O'Neill.  You are on the right track.  This playwright was born in Ireland.  The play he adapted into a 1938 movie was later turned into a "loverly" Broadway musical and movie.

He won the 1925 The Nobel Prize in Literature  "for his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty."

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23 minutes ago, Peebs said:

That's a great guess but it's not O'Neill.  You are on the right track.  This playwright was born in Ireland.  The play he adapted into a 1938 movie was later turned into a "loverly" Broadway musical and movie.

He won the 1925 The Nobel Prize in Literature  "for his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty."

George Bernard Shaw

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20 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

George Bernard Shaw

That's it.  Well done, Princess!  Bob Dylan is the other person to have won both a Nobel Prize (in Literature, 2016) and an Oscar (Best original Song ).

Your thread....

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Next: 

This classic actress appeared in two movie adaptations of a popular Broadway play. The first adaptation was in the 1930s, and the second one was in the 1960s. 

Not by coincidence, the same man directed both movies.

Can you identify the actress, the director and the various titles of the original play and the adaptations?

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Miriam Hopkins appeared (in different roles) in both These Three (1936) and The Children's Hour (1961), each of which are adaptations of the Lillian Hellman play The Children's Hour.  William Wyler directed both films.  The latter film was titled The Loudest Whisper in the UK.

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Thanks, Princess!  Peebs' Nobel Prize question made me think of a similar one...

Next:  

To date, there have been five Best Picture Oscar-winning films based on source material that won the Pulitzer Prize.  (Two of these were novels, two were plays, and one was investigative journalism.)

How many of them can you name?

 

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17 minutes ago, Peebs said:

1.  Gone with the Wind 

2.  All the King's Men

3.  You Can't Take It with You

4. Driving Miss Daisy

5.  Spotlight

All five, apparently...  🙂

Random factoid: Alfred Uhry (author of Driving Miss Daisy) taught at my high school while I was there (1976-1980).

Bravo, Peebs, and your Prize is...you get to think up the next question!  

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Thanks Fausterlitz!  I was a little surprised that Driving Miss Daisy won a Pulitzer.  Interesting that he taught at your HS!  I found an interview with him that said his book for the Broadway musical ''The Robber Bridgroom'' earned him a Tony Award nomination in 1976 but lost.  He apparently wrote jingles and tried his hand at musicals before he wrote "Daisy."

 

Next:  Who was the only actor to be nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor for the same performance? The rules were changed shortly after to prevent this from happening again.  Can you name the actor and the the movie for which he received the two nominations?  Hint, he won for Best Supporting Actor that year.  

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3 hours ago, Peebs said:

Thanks Fausterlitz!  I was a little surprised that Driving Miss Daisy won a Pulitzer.  Interesting that he taught at your HS!  I found an interview with him that said his book for the Broadway musical ''The Robber Bridgroom'' earned him a Tony Award nomination in 1976 but lost.  He apparently wrote jingles and tried his hand at musicals before he wrote "Daisy."

 

Next:  Who was the only actor to be nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor for the same performance? The rules were changed shortly after to prevent this from happening again.  Can you name the actor and the the movie for which he received the two nominations?  Hint, he won for Best Supporting Actor that year.  

Lionel Barrymore--"A Free Soul"

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7 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Lionel Barrymore--"A Free Soul"

A great guess but it is another actor.  This was a 1944 movie.  The actor lost the Best Actor to his co-star.  Both actors played priests.

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