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I have been swimming in water as crystal clear as this. Many years ago, inside a large cave in the Shenandoah National Park - along Skyline Drive. The water was so still and clear it was undetectable until touched. Freaky stuff.

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I have been swimming in water as crystal clear as this. Many years ago, inside a large cave in the Shenandoah National Park - along Skyline Drive. The water was so still and clear it was undetectable until touched. Freaky stuff.

 

 

 

There are other lakes like that.

 

Flathead Lake, Montana

 

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Sabah, Maylasia

 

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Bodrum, Turkey

 

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Konigssee, Germany

 

29K%C3%B6nigssee-Germany.jpg

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No, I haven't read it. I did look him up after reading your reply. That is an interesting story behind his appearance in the film as a punk rocker. This guy wears many hats - and Leonard Nimoy referred to him as a genius.

 

HERE is one article with some backstory.

 

If that film didn't have the humor in it my only reason for liking it

would be watching the beautiful Catherine Hicks.

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If that film didn't have the humor in it my only reason for liking it would be watching the beautiful Catherine Hicks.

 

Whenever I think of Catherine Hicks, the first film I think of is Child's Play, which isn't even a film I like very much. She married the special effects genius Kevin Yagher, one of the best in the business, two years later, and they've been together 25+ years now.

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Whenever I think of Catherine Hicks, the first film I think of is Child's Play, which isn't even a film I like very much. She married the special effects genius Kevin Yagher, one of the best in the business, two years later, and they've been together 25+ years now.

 

I have yet to sit through any of the Chucky films. There are parts I like but I prefer Puppet Master films.

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I have yet to sit through any of the Chucky films. There are parts I like but I prefer Puppet Master films.

 

The Chucky films are all rather awful. I'm not a killer doll fan, generally. But I did like some of the silliness of the Puppet Master movies.

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Parsec

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A parsec (symbol: pc) is a unit of length used to measure large distances to objects outside our Solar System. One parsec is the distance at which one astronomical unit subtends an angle of one arcsecond. A parsec is equal to about 3.26 light-years (31 trillion kilometres or 19 trillion miles) in length. The nearest star, Proxima Centauri, is about 1.3 parsecs (4.25 light-years) from the Sun. Most of the stars visible to the unaided eye in the nighttime sky are within 500 parsecs of the Sun.

 

The parsec unit was likely first suggested in 1913 by the British astronomer Herbert Hall Turner. Named from an abbreviation of the parallax of one arcsecond, it was defined so as to make calculations of astronomical distances quick and easy for astronomers from only their raw observational data. Partly for this reason, it is still the unit preferred in astronomy and astrophysics, though the light year remains prominent in popular science texts and everyday usage.

 

Although parsecs are used for the shorter distances within the Milky Way, multiples of parsecs are required for the larger scales in the universe, including kiloparsecs (kpc) for the more distant objects within and around the Milky Way, megaparsecs (Mpc) for all but the closest galaxies, and gigaparsecs (Gpc) for many quasars and the most distant galaxies.

 

In August 2015, the IAU passed Resolution B2, which as part of the definition of a standardized

absolute and apparent bolometric magnitude scale, included an explicit definition of the parsec as

exactly 648000 / Pi astronomical units, or approximately 3.08567758149137×1016 metres (based on

the IAU 2012 exact SI definition of the astronomical unit). This corresponds to the small-angle definition

of the parsec found in many contemporary astronomical references.

______________________________________

 

I hope this clarifies things.

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