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We today take computers, smartphones for granted in sending photos / video.  Amateur radio operators were the first to send photos by air during the 1960's - 80's time period.  Equipment was expensive - example the Robot 400 due to the cost of crude memory.

 

914802706_o.jpg?nc=636094404150063999

 

 

 

Took this much memory during the 70's just to send the equivalent of a 240 X 240 B&W photo!

 

914802735_o.jpg?nc=636094404150063999

 

 

SSTV demo video of using the Robot 400 (try not to laugh)

 

 

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Word of the Day  :

 

 

 

It is the equivalent of the thirteenth roll in a ‘baker's dozen.’ It is something thrown in, gratis, for good measure. The custom originated in the Spanish quarter of the city. When a child or a servant buys something in a shop—or even the mayor or the governor, for aught I know—he finishes the operation by saying—

 

  ‘Give me something for lagniappe.’

 

The shopman always responds; gives the child a bit of licorice-root, gives the servant a cheap cigar or a spool of thread, gives the governor—I don't know what he gives the governor; support, likely.

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We today take computers, smartphones for granted in sending photos / video.  Amateur radio operators were the first to send photos by air during the 1960's - 80's time period.  Equipment was expensive - example the Robot 400 due to the cost of crude memory.

 

 

 

 

 

Took this much memory during the 70's just to send the equivalent of a 240 X 240 B&W photo!

 

914802735_o.jpg?nc=636094404150063999

 

 

The innards of that thing look a lot like some of my older live audio production gear from the 80s/90s which was designed for heavy-duty touring use (in general that market segment wasn't as fickle with being trendy back in those years).  The nice thing is they have modular power supplies which are still being made, so easy to swap out for service.

 

 

 

 

SSTV demo video of using the Robot 400 (try not to laugh)

 

 

Interesting!

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Word of the Day  :

 

 

 

It is the equivalent of the thirteenth roll in a ‘baker's dozen.’ It is something thrown in, gratis, for good measure. The custom originated in the Spanish quarter of the city. When a child or a servant buys something in a shop—or even the mayor or the governor, for aught I know—he finishes the operation by saying—

 

  ‘Give me something for lagniappe.’

 

The shopman always responds; gives the child a bit of licorice-root, gives the servant a cheap cigar or a spool of thread, gives the governor—I don't know what he gives the governor; support, likely.

 

I want to say unequivocally that I am for this, most heartily. I am a lagniapper (langniappist?)

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I have a question for the technologically inclined on here. I recently was forced to turn in my previous cable box for a new, upgraded one. My cable service is Comcast, and my previous box was a Motorola HD-DVR box that I had been using for many years. I DVR'd movies in both HD and SD, and then transferred them to VHS to watch at a later date. The box was connected to the VCR via a regular coax cable.

 

This new box I received is a Samsung HD-DVR. I DVR'd a movie off of TCM, and attempted to put it on tape. However, the resulting recording ended up being in B&W (The film was in color, 1950's Treasure Island). I had connected the new box to the VCR using the same coax cable. I then connected the box to the VCR using component cables, and attempted to record the movie again. The same thing happened again. The film recorded in B&W. 

 

Anyone have any idea what could be causing this? I guess I can still record B&W movies, but color films won't turn out. Is this some sort of anti-copy protection?

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I have a question for the technologically inclined on here. I recently was forced to turn in my previous cable box for a new, upgraded one. My cable service is Comcast, and my previous box was a Motorola HD-DVR box that I had been using for many years. I DVR'd movies in both HD and SD, and then transferred them to VHS to watch at a later date. The box was connected to the VCR via a regular coax cable.

 

This new box I received is a Samsung HD-DVR. I DVR'd a movie off of TCM, and attempted to put it on tape. However, the resulting recording ended up being in B&W (The film was in color, 1950's Treasure Island). I had connected the new box to the VCR using the same coax cable. I then connected the box to the VCR using component cables, and attempted to record the movie again. The same thing happened again. The film recorded in B&W. 

 

Anyone have any idea what could be causing this? I guess I can still record B&W movies, but color films won't turn out. Is this some sort of anti-copy protection?

 

I don't think B&W-only is a anti-copy feature.  But who knows.

 

 

Not to be pedantic, but just to make sure we are using the same terminology:

 

 

Composite Video Cable - just one cable for all video.  Analog Standard Definition.  Also includes two audio cables - for a total of three cables.

300px-Composite-video-cable.jpg

 

Component Video Cable - Three cables for video.  Analog High Definition.  Also includes two audio cables - for a total of five cables.

 

220px-Component-cables.jpg

 

Coax - Goes to a tuner.  Everything combined.  I don't see how this could have anything to do with it, but my knowledge on integrating HD and SD equipment with these is really limited.  I only run one of these up to my HD satellite box (formerly HD cable box), and that is it.

 

170px-F-Stecker_und_Kabel.jpg

 

 

Having mentioned those cables, it sounds as if you might have the Green Component cable-box output connected to the Yellow Composite VCR input (Green = luminance / B&W part of picture).  Or maybe the Yellow Composite cable-box output "is" connected to the Yellow Composite VCR input, but in either case there may be an output setting on the cable-box to switch between HD and SD (which, due to cost-cutting, could potentially disable or hose up all the other outputs).  Or you may have a choice on the cable-box outputs between 1080i, 720p, and 480i.  Look for those kinds of things to begin with.  Take note of the original settings, then try setting the cable-box output to 480i, and also set the aspect ratio to 4:3 to record directly to your VCR.

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I was surprised this morning to open up my local paper and see a headline about my small town of Lake City being the setting for a Travel Channel ghost show called The Dead Files. They will be discussing a case that I had never heard of, the lynching of a Syrian-immigrant store owner in the late 1920's. I've never seen the show, as I don't care for the psychic/ghost-hunter shows, but what a proud moment for my hometown. <_<

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Thanks for the response, MovieCollector.

 

You're correct, I am using a yellow composite video cable, with the red and white stereo sound cables. The VCR is old enough that it doesn't have a component input/output. I also have a regular old coax cable connected, which was the set-up with my old box. I also used to record SD and HD (1080i) with no problems using the coax. I also tried switching the box outputs between SD and HD to see if it would help, but it didn't.

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Thanks for the response, MovieCollector.

 

You're correct, I am using a yellow composite video cable, with the red and white stereo sound cables. The VCR is old enough that it doesn't have a component input/output. I also have a regular old coax cable connected, which was the set-up with my old box. I also used to record SD and HD (1080i) with no problems using the coax. I also tried switching the box outputs between SD and HD to see if it would help, but it didn't.

 

One more quick question.  (Since you used to use the Coax to connect the two in the past.)  When you had your composite cable connected, did you flip through the tuner on the VCR until you got to a "line in" setting, or whatever the VCR setting is to connect using Composite?  Or maybe the VCR has an input selector button.  This needs to be set too.

 

Failing that...What's the model number of your new Samsung HD-DVR cable-box?  You might need to look around at the back to find it.  Maybe there is something more to know about it.

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One more quick question.  (Since you used to use the Coax to connect the two in the past.)  When you had your composite cable connected, did you flip through the tuner on the VCR until you got to a "line in" setting, or whatever the VCR setting is to connect using Composite?  Or maybe the VCR has an input selector button.  This needs to be set too.

 

Failing that...What's the model number of your new Samsung HD-DVR cable-box?  You might need to look around at the back to find it.  Maybe there is something more to know about it.

 

I think I got it figured out. Previously, I could record HD programs straight to VHS with no trouble. Now, it appears, I will have to switch the new box output to SD 480p to record properly. I had tried the 480i previously and it came out in B&W, but I tried it 480p and it came out fine. It just adds a few more steps before and after recording sessions from now on.

 

Ah, progress!  <_<

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I think I got it figured out. Previously, I could record HD programs straight to VHS with no trouble. Now, it appears, I will have to switch the new box output to SD 480p to record properly. I had tried the 480i previously and it came out in B&W, but I tried it 480p and it came out fine. It just adds a few more steps before and after recording sessions from now on.

 

Ah, progress!  <_<

 

Cool...  :)  (although I wasn't expecting that)

 

P.S. Only answer I can think of is...maybe now your cable co sends SD in 480p.

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I think I got it figured out. Previously, I could record HD programs straight to VHS with no trouble. Now, it appears, I will have to switch the new box output to SD 480p to record properly. I had tried the 480i previously and it came out in B&W, but I tried it 480p and it came out fine. It just adds a few more steps before and after recording sessions from now on.

 

Ah, progress!  <_<

 

Yeah, I suppose this whole thing could be quite confusing here, huh Lawrence.

 

I mean, say, you're watching a B&W recording of the opening of a certain old sitcom, and instead of the theme song ending with "and all the rest here on Gilligan's Isle" it actually includes the names of the Professor and Mary Ann!

 

(...and then of course you'd think to yourself somethin' like, "HEY, what the hell is WRONG here? When they mention THOSE two by name at the beginning, this thing is always supposed to be IN COLOR!")

 

;)

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I think I got it figured out. Previously, I could record HD programs straight to VHS with no trouble. Now, it appears, I will have to switch the new box output to SD 480p to record properly. I had tried the 480i previously and it came out in B&W, but I tried it 480p and it came out fine. It just adds a few more steps before and after recording sessions from now on.

 

Ah, progress!  <_<

 

The info can come on handy for others, i stands for interlaced for progressive scan.  Must have done something to the color burst signal the analog VCR requires.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorburst

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The info can come on handy for others, i stands for interlaced for progressive scan.  Must have done something to the color burst signal the analog VCR requires.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorburst

As newer revisions and sharp pencil administrative types usually go, I'm thinking maybe a reduced parts count for the newer cable DVR, ie. maybe it cannot faithfully create a 480i where a 480i doesn't exist in the first place (based on previous cable DVR working just fine - and assuming cable carrier used 480p all along and didn't change anything else).  That would be the first I have heard of cable carriers not using 480i, but I really don't get out much. Maybe there is more to the story.  The plot thickens.

:P

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When I got my first Directv receiver in 1999, was in the process of doing some home remodeling, thought I install a permanent system capable of 4 receivers, at present have only 2. (multi switch pictured below) Directv charge an extra $6 for each additional box and replacement is FREE.  Can't beat that.

 

Something odd but nice happened during the dish installation, someone was helping me in aiming the dish.  He got a bit frustrated aiming it and accidentally pointed it toward the siding of the house at a shallow angle and got a signal.  It appears the satellite 12 GHZ signal is highly reflective - bounce off the siding and to the dish.  My signal strength is 97  :)

 

It's also located underneath a window awning, out of worst of the weather.

 

1156581984978_rca_d6530.jpg

 

Need to inform this guy, he needs only 1 dish. :wacko: 

 

ulhotnmced87tf1qeruz.jpg

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What I love about my old school Directv receiver -  only has coax and 2 separate  video/audio out. No headaches.  

 

receivers_big.jpg

 

 

We got our Directv a little over two years ago.  The promotional period ended for us a couple months ago, and we decided to keep it.  We dropped our service level down to the lowest standard package, which still includes TCM.

 

At first the installers didn't think we could receive the signal.  We had a guy come out who visually inspected our yard, walked around a bit, and then told us he didn't think it would work.  Then we had them send a second installer out a couple weeks later.  They brought out what I am guessing was a little pocket inclinometer/compass, which one of them looked through, past the house and towards the satellite.  Standing on the grass along the edge of our house, they saw there was enough of a clearing and said it would work.  Next thing I know they had their ladders out and were climbing up and installing it.

 

I later read up on it, and apparently some installers will try to get out of a more challenging install by saying it wouldn't work.  Or sometimes they will do this just to get home on time that day.  Not the norm, but it can happen.

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What I love about my old school Directv receiver -  only has coax and 2 separate  video/audio out. No headaches.  

 

receivers_big.jpg

 

 

Here's the one I ended up with, a Genie HR-44.  Not a whole going on with the outside, but like yours it is mostly remote control-driven and the inside gets busy.  Since I'm all about better cooling, I'm using the unused USB port on the back to power up a laptop cooling fan, which this sits on top of.

 

Directv%20HR-44%20front.png

 

Directv%20HR-44%20rear.png

 

 

 

 

Also here is the remote.  Not as iconic as a Tivo remote, but it's nice and simple.

 

Directv%20remote.jpeg

 

 

There is more to it than that, as I have a couple client extenders (Directv Genie mini) for the other rooms, each with its own remote, but this is the center of the Directv system we have.

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