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http://mitp.nautil.us/feature/271/ideology-is-the-original-augmented-reality

Ideology Is the Original Augmented Reality

How we fill gaps in our everyday experiences.

By Slavoj Žižek

 

Released in July 2016, Pokémon Go is a location-based, augmented-reality game for mobile devices, typically played on mobile phones; players use the device’s GPS and camera to capture, battle, and train virtual creatures (“Pokémon”) who appear on the screen as if they were in the same real-world location as the player: As players travel the real world, their avatar moves along the game’s map. Different Pokémon species reside in different areas—for example, water-type Pokémon are generally found near water. When a player encounters a Pokémon, AR (Augmented Reality) mode uses the camera and gyroscope on the player’s mobile device to display an image of a Pokémon as though it were in the real world.* This AR mode is what makes Pokémon Go different from other PC games: Instead of taking us out of the real world and drawing us into the artificial virtual space, it combines the two; we look at reality and interact with it through the fantasy frame of the digital screen, and this intermediary frame supplements reality with virtual elements which sustain our desire to participate in the game, push us to look for them in a reality which, without this frame, would leave us indifferent. Sound familiar? Of course it does. What the technology of Pokémon Go externalizes is simply the basic mechanism of ideology—at its most basic, ideology is the primordial version of “augmented reality.”

The first step in this direction of technology imitating ideology was taken a couple of years ago by Pranav Mistry, a member of the Fluid Interfaces Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, who developed a wearable “gestural interface” called “SixthSense.”** The hardware—a small webcam that dangles from one’s neck, a pocket projector, and a mirror, all connected wirelessly to a smartphone in one’s pocket—forms a wearable mobile device. The user begins by handling objects and making gestures; the camera recognizes and tracks the user’s hand gestures and the physical objects using computer vision-based techniques. The software processes the video stream data, reading it as a series of instructions, and retrieves the appropriate information (texts, images, etc.) from the Internet; the device then projects this information onto any physical surface available—all surfaces, walls, and physical objects around the wearer can serve as interfaces. Here are some examples of how it works: In a bookstore, I pick up a book and hold it in front of me; immediately, I see projected onto the book’s cover its reviews and ratings. I can navigate a map displayed on a nearby surface, zoom in, zoom out, or pan across, using intuitive hand movements. I make a sign of @ with my fingers and a virtual PC screen with my email account is projected onto any surface in front of me; I can then write messages by typing on a virtual keyboard. And one could go much further here—just think how such a device could transform sexual interaction. (It suffices to concoct, along these lines, a sexist male dream: Just look at a woman, make the appropriate gesture, and the device will project a description of her relevant characteristics—divorced, easy to seduce, likes jazz and Dostoyevsky, good at ****, etc., etc.) In this way, the entire world becomes a “multi-touch surface,” while the whole Internet is constantly mobilized to supply additional data allowing me to orient myself.

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27 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

The first step in this direction of technology imitating ideology was taken a couple of years ago by Pranav Mistry, a member of the Fluid Interfaces Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, who developed a wearable “gestural interface” called “SixthSense.”** The hardware—a small webcam that dangles from one’s neck, a pocket projector, and a mirror, all connected wirelessly to a smartphone in one’s pocket—forms a wearable mobile device. The user begins by handling objects and making gestures; the camera recognizes and tracks the user’s hand gestures and the physical objects using computer vision-based techniques. The software processes the video stream data, reading it as a series of instructions, and retrieves the appropriate information (texts, images, etc.) from the Internet; the device then projects this information onto any physical surface available—all surfaces, walls, and physical objects around the wearer can serve as interfaces. Here are some examples of how it works: In a bookstore, I pick up a book and hold it in front of me; immediately, I see projected onto the book’s cover its reviews and ratings. I can navigate a map displayed on a nearby surface, zoom in, zoom out, or pan across, using intuitive hand movements. I make a sign of @ with my fingers and a virtual PC screen with my email account is projected onto any surface in front of me; I can then write messages by typing on a virtual keyboard. And one could go much further here—just think how such a device could transform sexual interaction. (It suffices to concoct, along these lines, a sexist male dream: Just look at a woman, make the appropriate gesture, and the device will project a description of her relevant characteristics—divorced, easy to seduce, likes jazz and Dostoyevsky, good at ****, etc., etc.) In this way, the entire world becomes a “multi-touch surface,” while the whole Internet is constantly mobilized to supply additional data allowing me to orient myself.

There is a science fiction writer named Vernor Vinge who has written several stories and novels about this subject starting back in 2001. I read many of them, and think of them often as I see emergent technology catching up to his ideas 15+ years later. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernor_Vinge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Collected_Stories_of_Vernor_Vinge#"Fast_Times_at_Fairmont_High"

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34 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

There is a science fiction writer named Vernor Vinge who has written several stories and novels about this subject starting back in 2001. I read many of them, and think of them often as I see emergent technology catching up to his ideas 15+ years later. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernor_Vinge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Collected_Stories_of_Vernor_Vinge#"Fast_Times_at_Fairmont_High"

Fassbinder's "World on a Wire" deals with virtual reality but it also tackles some of the main themes of augmented reality and what is real and what is fake. 

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http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-spacex-landing-vandenberg-20181007-story.html

In a first, SpaceX launches and lands a rocket at Vandenberg base

In a move that could cut its costs to launch space hardware even further, SpaceX landed a first-stage booster on a pad at Vandenberg Air Force Base on Sunday night.

It marked the first time the company has pulled off its now-signature rocket recovery method on land on the West Coast.

Hawthorne-based SpaceX has been landing rocket boosters regularly at its Florida launch sites, but the California landing pad could allow the company to refurbish rockets at Vandenberg. First-stage boosters that landed on SpaceX’s floating platform in the Pacific Ocean returned to the Port of Los Angeles and were then trucked to Hawthorne for refurbishment.

The landing came after the Hawthorne company launched the SAOCOM 1A Earth observation satellite for Argentina’s national commission on space activities at 7:21 p.m. Pacific time. The launch was delayed one day for “pre-flight vehicle checkouts,” SpaceXtweeted last week.

 

The launch illuminated the sky, prompting a flood of social media messages from those caught off guard by the eerie display in California.

Still, Vandenberg Air Force Base had warned residents last week in nearby Lompoc and other Central California cities that they could hear “one or more” sonic booms associated with the landing of the first-stage booster.

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http://thephilosophicalsalon.com/pure-jet-lag-thinking-with-paul-virilio-1932-2018/

PURE JET LAG: THINKING WITH PAUL VIRILIO (1932-2018) 

Like a number of French thinkers during the twentieth century, Paul Virilio had a penchant for the concise summary, a talent for aphorisms adaptable to a variety of settings. “When you invent the ship, you also invent the shipwreck; when you invent the plane, you also invent the plane crash,” he remarks in Politics of the Very Worst (1999). “Every technology carries its own negativity, which is invented at the same time as technical progress.” Against prevailing market ideologies of science and innovation – and against the humorless, irony-free character of such ideologies – Virilio pointed to the lurking death drive that inhabits the underside of such technological optimism. His passing last month at the age of eighty-six silenced a critical voice that countered the sanguine enthusiasm of our techno-consumptive age, one with an indispensable wit that leavened the claustrophobia of our times.

Born in Paris in 1932, Virilio belonged to a generation who experienced the German occupation, the Algerian War (where Virilio served in the French army), and the protests of May 1968, during which he became a professor in the École Spéciale d’Architecture. His work drew upon these pivotal moments in different ways, his firsthand experience of warfare being the most crucial. It informed such major works as Bunker Archaeology (1975), Speed and Politics(1977), and Pure War (1983). Unlike his peers Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, and Jean Baudrillard, whose understandings of social power through images, language, and sexuality often took domesticated and therefore more elusive forms, Virilio approached power through more traditional means, examining how militarization, technological innovation, and, most significantly, speed defined modern life.      

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https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/China-to-Launch-Artificial-Moon-in-2022-20181020-0007.html

  • A super moon appears in the sky in Cairo, Egypt, in this file photo taken October 17, 2016.
  • A s

     

    The “man-made moon’s” purpose is to help illuminate urban areas in order to assist in cases like blackouts and natural disasters.

    China is poised to launch a moon-like satellite into space with the aim to provide illumination for its urban centers, by 2022. 

    The controls and launch plans will be ready by 2020 but the actual launching would take place two years later. The ambitious plan, orchestrated by the Asian giant, consists of launching a satellite into the Earth’s atmosphere  — approximately 500 kilometers over Chengdu — which would function as a reflective mirror for sunlight.

    “By then [2022], the three huge mirrors will divide the 360-degree orbital plane, illuminating an area for 24 hours,” according to Wu Chunfeng, director of Tianfu New District System Science Research Institute of Chengdu.

    The “man-made moon’s” purpose is to help illuminate urban areas in order to assist in cases like blackouts and natural disasters. The reflection of light from the sphere, which would cover an urban area of 3,600 kilometers to 6,400 kilometers, will have an intensity of approximately eight times that of the real moon’s light.

    According to Wu, this project would generate considerable savings in urban centers. “Using man-made moon to illuminate an area 50 square kilometers can save 1.2 billion yuan [more than US$170 million] in electric charge.”

    The project is not without precedent. Russia attempted a similar launching of a mirror into space during the 1990s, to reflect sunlight over its territory, however, the mirror failed to unfold and the project was subsequently halted.

    uper moon appears in the sky in Cairo, Egypt, in this file photo taken October 17

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