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slaytonf

Did Rock Hudson ever make a good movie?

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'Course he did.  Giant is one of 'em.  Mmm, can't think of another.  Was Seconds any good?  Is the fact that no one has started a thread for his SOTM turn an indication that the temperature of excitement for him is not so high?  To tell the truth, I was never so jazzed by his movies.  But Giant was great.  Or was that just George Stevens making a good movie around him?

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'Course he did.  Giant is one of 'em.  Mmm, can't think of another.  Was Seconds any good?  Is the fact that no one has started a thread for his SOTM turn an indication that the temperature of excitement for him is not so high?  To tell the truth, I was never so jazzed by his movies.  But Giant was great.  Or was that just George Stevens making a good movie around him?

There's a thread for him in the TCM programs forum-- and people do seem very jazzed about him and his movies.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/48433-rock-hudson-as-sotm-june-2014/

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his comedies with doris day and tony randall were very good. he had fine comic ability.

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YES!

 

Giant is overrated, but he's good in it. Written on the Wind isn't exactly Citizen Kane, but it has a lot of strong points. I've never seen Seconds, but it's well regarded (and I really want to see it.) Pretty Maids all in a Row is an intriguing cult film I've yet to see but want to very much. I'm not a huge fan of Pillow Talk or (especially) Lover Come Back- but they have their fans. Magnificent Obsession is junk, but it was still a significant film. I CAN'T STAND Man's Favorite Sport? but it has its admirers (for some reason unfathomable to me.)

 

He was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar for Giant and- according to Danny Peary's excellent but sadly out of print Alternate Oscars, deserved a Best Actor nomination for The Tarnished Angels in 1958.

 

My personal favorite is All that Heaven Allows- which is a simple film in which not a lot happens on the surface, but it has a timelessness and a quiet beauty that I admire.

 

Was he a great actor? Eh...I think he was one of those who was never really given an opportunity to tap his inner dramatic strengths (which i don't doubt were present), and I think he didn't take a lot of his assignments seriously, and it shows in the final result...but he was a MOVIE STAR and his place in the lore of filmdom is inarguable.

 

I also have to add that June is gay pride month and this possibly influenced the decision of the network to feature him as their SOTM- which is fine.

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He made eight (perhaps nine) films with Douglas Sirk. Several of them are pretty good. And at least three of them are excellent examples of 50s style.

 

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YES!

 

He was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar for Giant and- according to Danny Peary's excellent but sadly out of print Alternate Oscars, deserved a Best Actor nomination for The Tarnished Angels in 1958.

 

My personal favorite is All that Heaven Allows- which is a simple film in which not a lot happens on the surface, but it has a timelessness and a quiet beauty that I admire.

 

Was he a great actor? Eh...I think he was one of those who was never really given an opportunity to tap his inner dramatic strengths (which i don't doubt were present), and I think he didn't take a lot of his assignments seriously, and it shows in the final result...but he was a MOVIE STAR and his place in the lore of filmdom is inarguable.

 

I also have to add that June is gay pride month and this possibly influenced the decision of the network to feature him as their SOTM- which is fine.

Based on your comments, I will look forward to seeing The Tarnished Angels, Pretty Maids All in a Row, and All that Heaven Allows.

 

With regard to your speculation TCM coordinated his salute with gay pride month is, if it's true, as Lili Von Shtupp says,  "How owdinawy."

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He made eight (perhaps nine) films with Douglas Sirk. Several of them are pretty good. And at least three of them are excellent examples of 50s style.

 

If it doesn't sound too peremptory, what are they, and why are they good?

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If it doesn't sound too peremptory, what are they, and why are they good?

Too tired to list them all, but three of them are All that Heaven Allows, Magnificent Obsession, and Written on the Wind. There's an unusually good evaluation of Douglas Sirk on Wikipedia, with which I largely agree.

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Did Rock Hudson ever make a good movie?

 

Sure, though not as many as about 100 to 200 other actors or actresses, from the silent era to the present day. I could probably take a deep breath and list about 30 or 40 of them before coming up for air, but I don't want to be snarky. :)

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Based on your comments, I will look forward to seeing The Tarnished Angels, Pretty Maids All in a Row, and All that Heaven Allows.

 

 

Well, I'm not sure if they're showing Pretty Maids All in a Row as part of their salute- but you can read up on it on wikipedia, it sounds like a weeeeird and kinda kinky film, I know it has a pretty memorable entry in The Psycotronic Video Guide and was based on a screenplay by Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry (sp?). I am pretty sure TCM did show All That Heaven Allows recently as part of The Story of Film, but it's a Universal movie that used to show up from time to time on AMC, so I dunno if they have got it on the schedule for this month, although I hope so and I hope it continues to show up on TCM, it's one of those films I am always glad to see.

 

Another one I'm interested in but haven't seen is Has Anybody Seen My Gal? -another Sirk film, and not one of the ones that is often discussed when people mention his films.

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Another one I'm interested in but haven't seen is Has Anybody Seen My Gal? -another Sirk film, and not one of the ones that is often discussed when people mention his films.

It's a period piece, set in the roaring 20s.  I like it.  Great supporting turn by Charles Coburn. Rock's love interest is played by Piper Laurie.  And James Dean has an uncredited part (in one of his first films) in a malt shoppe scene. 

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just checked. All That Heaven Allows IS showing as part of the tribute on Thursday, June 12th at 10:00 pm (EST.) Shame it isn't on before the inferior Magnificent Obsession, but oh well.

 

it's a title that could show up monthly on the schedule for the next two years and I wouldn't gripe even once. (maybe they can retire The Great Race to make it their new weekend time-filler. )

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Did Rock Hudson ever make a good movie?

 

Sure, though not as many as about 100 to 200 other actors or actresses, from the silent era to the present day. I could probably take a deep breath and list about 30 or 40 of them before coming up for air, but I don't want to be snarky. :)

 

Wha--?  Oh, I get it.

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Good God, yes!!!  See SECONDS if you have any doubts.  It may be his best.  Also, ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS, GIANT and the comedies with Doris Day are still pretty funny with some good lines in them.  I'm sure there are many others, too.  Was he the greatest actor ever?  Of course not, but I think he was a very decent actor especially in a good, challenging film.  He could do comedy or drama and he was nice to look at.  Now I want to see TARNISHED ANGELS - thanks to those who mentioned it.

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Let's mention some that are overlooked...

 

Tobruk - very good WWII desert commando yarn

 

Something of Value - lives up to its title.

 

Blindfold (nice adaptation of a Lucille Fletcher novel, would be appreciated if Universal would put it on DVD)

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Just checked the schedule and TCM is showing a lot of Rock's movies that we've been talking about here, including the superb SECONDS near the end of the month.

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Seconds is a good film, though Hudson doesn't appear in it for the first half hour or more. I haven't seen many of the Hudson films named by others on this thread because I've never been able to get particularly enthused about this particular actor. I find him a stolid performer and often more than a bit dull.

 

He was a contemporary of James Garner who, among other things, also made a few '60s comedies with Doris Day. Garner was a TV favourite who successfully graduated to the movies. I often find Garner to be incredibly charming (infinitely moreso than Hudson) with far greater flair for comedy. Yet it was Hudson, much to my amazement, that was a far greater box office king in the movies. The luck of the draw, I suppose. I would take Garner's Americanization of Emily (a box office dud) or Victor Victoria (both co-starring Julie Andrews, of course) over anything I have seen of Hudson (which, I admit, is limited). And Garner's TV detective work, of course, in Rockford Files blows Hudson's detective comedy-drama McMillan and Wife right out of the water, as far as I'm concerned.

 

Sorry, Hudson fans, for my brief diatribe, and a bit of a head scratch over this actor's once great popularity, especially when comparing him to a leading man contemporary who  never scaled the same heights in movie popularity as him but had, as far as I'm concerned, far greater talent and personality. (Admittedly, though, much of Garner's greatest work was on television).

 

 

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Seconds is a good film, though Hudson doesn't appear in it for the first half hour or more. I haven't seen many of the Hudson films named by others on this thread because I've never been able to get particularly enthused about this particular actor. I find him a stolid performer and often more than a bit dull.

 

He was a contemporary of James Garner who, among other things, also made a few '60s comedies with Doris Day. Garner was a TV favourite who successfully graduated to the movies. I often find Garner to be incredibly charming (infinitely moreso than Hudson) with far greater flair for comedy. Yet it was Hudson, much to my amazement, that was a far greater box office king in the movies. The luck of the draw, I suppose. I would take Garner's Americanization of Emily (a box office dud) or Victor Victoria (both co-starring Julie Andrews, of course) over anything I have seen of Hudson (which, I admit, is limited). And Garner's TV detective work, of course, in Rockford Files blows Hudson's detective comedy-drama McMillan and Wife right out of the water, as far as I'm concerned.

 

Sorry, Hudson fans, for my brief diatribe, and a bit of a head scratch over this actor's once great popularity, especially when comparing him to a leading man contemporary who  never scaled the same heights in movie popularity as him but had, as far as I'm concerned, far greater talent and personality. (Admittedly, though, much of Garner's greatest work was on television).

I second Seconds.

 

Amazing film, and an outstanding performance from Hudson. Too bad he wasn't given material like this during the other however many stinko films he made in his career.

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his comedies with doris day and tony randall were very good. he had fine comic ability.

LOVER COME BACK is one of my 5 favorite comic films, EVER. Doris was great, but he wasn't bad, either.

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I recognize that there are some who do not care for the Day-Hudson comedies or are seeing them from a different perspective. However, they would certainly qualify as "Good Movies" and the response they received upon their release would justify that title.

 

"Pillow Talk" and "Lover Come Back" were massive box-office successes, received mostly glowing reviews, were named as among by top ten films of their respective years by numerous critics and received multiple Oscar nominations.

 

If you view them without preconceived notions or allowing the sometimes cynical and snide remarks that some have made during the intervening years, they remain very, very funny thanks to good scripts, fine supporting casts but most especially the great chemistry that Day and Hudson have. Something happens when they are together and clearly that spilled over into their personal friendship since I recall a joint interview they did from Carmel in May of 1983 for "Good Morning America". The 20 minute sequence was almost as delightful as one of their big-screen comedies.

 

I am not trying to say that their films are for everyone but they do hold up better than some would dare admit.

 

I teach a film class at a college and as part of a class in April screened the 1964 Day-Hudson comedy, "Send Me No Flowers". Out of the class of 29, only 2 had seen the film previously and even I was stunned by the laughter and enjoyment the class experienced while watching the picture and the enthusiastic applause that greeted the film. Several students even told me afterwards variations of "Now that was a funny film and what a great pairing. I've always avoided Doris Day and Rock Hudson films because I was told they were "uncool'. Nothing could be further from the truth....."

 

So in my personal opinion, Rock did make some "good movies". While his career may have never included that great, defining picture that some stars have made - often in more than one instance - he did make much more than a handful that are worthy of note and that, in some instances, continue to entertain or intrigue ("Seconds" for instance). 

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I recognize that there are some who do not care for the Day-Hudson comedies or are seeing them from a different perspective. However, they would certainly qualify as "Good Movies" and the response they received upon their release would justify that title.

 

"Pillow Talk" and "Lover Come Back" were massive box-office successes, received mostly glowing reviews, were named as among by top ten films of their respective years by numerous critics and received multiple Oscar nominations.

 

If you view them without preconceived notions or allowing the sometimes cynical and snide remarks that some have made during the intervening years, they remain very, very funny thanks to good scripts, fine supporting casts but most especially the great chemistry that Day and Hudson have. Something happens when they are together and clearly that spilled over into their personal friendship since I recall a joint interview they did from Carmel in May of 1983 for "Good Morning America". The 20 minute sequence was almost as delightful as one of their big-screen comedies.

 

I am not trying to say that their films are for everyone but they do hold up better than some would dare admit.

 

I teach a film class at a college and as part of a class in April screened the 1964 Day-Hudson comedy, "Send Me No Flowers". Out of the class of 29, only 2 had seen the film previously and even I was stunned by the laughter and enjoyment the class experienced while watching the picture and the enthusiastic applause that greeted the film. Several students even told me afterwards variations of "Now that was a funny film and what a great pairing. I've always avoided Doris Day and Rock Hudson films because I was told they were "uncool'. Nothing could be further from the truth....."

 

So in my personal opinion, Rock did make some "good movies". While his career may have never included that great, defining picture that some stars have made - often in more than one instance - he did make much more than a handful that are worthy of note and that, in some instances, continue to entertain or intrigue ("Seconds" for instance). 

If you view them without preconceived notions or allowing the sometimes cynical and snide remarks that some have made during the intervening years,

 

How can you possibly watch these movies as if you were seeing them in 1959 and 1961? Good for you if you can.

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