Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

List of Friday Night Spotlights


rdmtimp
 Share

Recommended Posts

Much like the lists of Stars of the Month and Summer Under the Stars, here's a (not quite complete) list for reference of the Friday Night Spotlights to date (anyone remember who hosted the Science one in January?).

 

2013
 
April - A Woman's World  (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Noir Writers (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - The Hollywood Costume (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I (Wesley Clark)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Classic Pre-code (Robert Osborne and Alec Baldwin)
October - Africa (Alex Trebek)
November - Road Movies
December - Directed by Charles Walters
Edited by rdmtimp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jan. 2014 spotlight, SCIENCE IN THE MOVIES was hosted by Dr. Sean Michael Carroll, PhD, senior research associate in the Department of Physics at the California Institute of Technology. Carroll, the author of such popular books as From Eternity to Here and The Particle at the End of the Universe, has contributed to a number of scientific journals and magazines, and appeared on TV shows including the History Channel's The Universe and Comedy Central's The Colbert Report.

 

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks mr6666!

 

Updated:

 

2013
 
April - Women in Movies (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Film Noir (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I 
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of these have been better than others.  Unfortunately, as they got underway, a lot of them have just been an excuse to re-present or resell films that are already in heavy rotation on TCM.  The two that stand out for me as exemplary are: Second Looks (which did show some obscure classics that seldom air on TCM); and the one about food in the movies (though despite being gimmicky, because some selections only had one scene involving food, it proved they were thinking outside the box and helped open the doors to a few rarely seen foreign titles).

 

The least noteworthy one in my opinion was the month on screwball comedies.  All of those titles (even MY MAN GODFREY) turn up quite often on TCM, and Broderick's monotone hosting style was anything but exciting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

" Unfortunately, as they got underway, a lot of them have just been an excuse to re-present or resell films that are already in heavy rotation on TCM."

 

Too bad, but that does seem to be the case. I had hoped, if they give a 'spotlight', it would be on more unusual subjects. (the Australian Cinema was the treat for me) Mentioned in other threads were animated films (& shorts) or foreign horror films.

Any other suggestions??

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favorite was "Second Looks," and personally I wouldn't mind seeing "Second Looks, Pt. 2." I also liked Truffaut month a lot, but I did too much serial watching. Not good for me, I suspect.

 

The only FNSL idea that has occurred to me appeals directly to my taste: "Musicals Around the World!" I don't know about anyone else, but these are something I'd really like to see. I watched some of "Jolly Fellows" on YT, which is from the Soviet Union, and it was pretty bizarre. I'd also like to see "Singing Lovebirds" from Japan, and from France maybe something with Georges Guétary (of An American in Paris fame) or Carlos Gardel.

 

Anyway, it seems like more foreign films is a popular idea around here. I hope TCM takes it to heart. (BTW, obrienmundy, I saw your schedule. I like the unrelenting lean on silent and foreign films a lot.)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

" Unfortunately, as they got underway, a lot of them have just been an excuse to re-present or resell films that are already in heavy rotation on TCM."

 

Too bad, but that does seem to be the case. I had hoped, if they give a 'spotlight', it would be on more unusual subjects. (the Australian Cinema was the treat for me) Mentioned in other threads were animated films (& shorts) or foreign horror films.

Any other suggestions??

:)

I am glad they did the spotlight on Aussie cinema.  Including these films on TCM helped bring more diversity to the channel, and I am in support of that.  The Pirate theme for this month (June 2014) does not earn high marks from me.  They are broadcasting many films that air often on TCM all year round.  The one rarity that stands out is AGAINST ALL FLAGS, but that could have easily been added to Maureen O'Hara's Star of the Month tribute. So I tend to find the spotlight on Pirates to be unnecessary and pretty much filler.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favorite was "Second Looks," and personally I wouldn't mind seeing "Second Looks, Pt. 2." I also liked Truffaut month a lot, but I did too much serial watching. Not good for me, I suspect.

 

The only FNSL idea that has occurred to me appeals directly to my taste: "Musicals Around the World!" I don't know about anyone else, but these are something I'd really like to see. I watched some of "Jolly Fellows" on YT, which is from the Soviet Union, and it was pretty bizarre. I'd also like to see "Singing Lovebirds" from Japan, and from France maybe something with Georges Guétary (of An American in Paris fame) or Carlos Gardel.

 

Anyway, it seems like more foreign films is a popular idea around here. I hope TCM takes it to heart. (BTW, obrienmundy, I saw your schedule. I like the unrelenting lean on silent and foreign films a lot.)

I would prefer if the spotlights were not such general, broad-based themes (like pirates or even food).  It would be nice if they started to focus more on the specific crafstmanship of classic motion pictures.  For example, in the early 50s, the Anso-color process was all the rage and several studios attempted a handful of films using that process.  It would be great to showcase those films together and have an expert on who could tell us about the way color was evolving in mainstream Hollywood cinema ten to fifteen years after the debut of Technicolor.  

 

A similar topic from the same period would be the early 3-D craze.  On the final evening, a few more recent films in 3-D could be screened to show how the technology recently made a comeback in Hollywood.  I think this would be a better more interesting way to conduct the Friday Night Spotlights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think something like color or 3-D movies would hold my attention very long. Coloration technique isn't enough to keep me interested through a whole month, or even a whole film, for that matter. (Unless it's hand-tinted, and that early two-strip has a certain charm, also.) I guess it would depend on the films being shown. I don't know what films were colored what way, or how each process looked different from another, but when studios went all-out on new color it often seemed like they skimped on the rest of the film itself, just using it as a flashy gimmick. The same with 3-D, and you can't even see that on television. (Not to mention if TCM showed new 3-D movies I'd wither.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think something like color or 3-D movies would hold my attention very long. Coloration technique isn't enough to keep me interested through a whole month, or even a whole film, for that matter. (Unless it's hand-tinted, and that early two-strip has a certain charm, also.) I guess it would depend on the films being shown. I don't know what films were colored what way, or how each process looked different from another, but when studios went all-out on new color it often seemed like they skimped on the rest of the film itself, just using it as a flashy gimmick. The same with 3-D, and you can't even see that on television. (Not to mention if TCM showed new 3-D movies I'd wither.)

Well, I suppose that is true to some extent-- though not every production that used a new technical innovation skimped on story or shortchanged other aspects of filmmaking.  It would definitely depend on the overall quality of the titles selected.  

 

Even with a 3-D film, you can still tell it is filmed a certain way if you look carefully.  Yesterday I watched GUN FURY on the Encore Westerns Channel.  And you could see it was made for audiences to watch in 3-D when the cowboys and natives started throwing weapons directly into the camera.

 

At any rate, I was mentioning Ansco and 3-D as mere examples.  The Friday Night Spotlight could easily focus more on the art and craft of filmmaking, instead of random themes that anyone can put together by using a keyword search on the database. I think audiences could benefit from watching wraparounds that discuss how certain techniques enhance motion pictures, instead of watching a series of films and wraparounds that are tenuously linked together by a vague idea TCM is using to re-present or resell films that are in heavy rotation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can agree with that, TB, there could certainly be many subjects for a spotlight that would not only introduce us to lesser-known films but also teach us something interesting about the history of film making that we didn't know before. I didn't mean to step on any ideas, I'm sorry if it came off that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can agree with that, TB, there could certainly be many subjects for a spotlight that would not only introduce us to lesser-known films but also teach us something interesting about the history of film making that we didn't know before. I didn't mean to step on any ideas, I'm sorry if it came off that way.

No problem.  TCM (and its various platforms) have the potential to educate as well as entertain.  Why not use the Friday Night Spotlight to help educate people about filmmaking and its more inspired techniques.  This way, even with often-played/often-seen titles, people can find something new in the text of the film they may have missed before.  It gives them a reason to stay tuned to TCM and re-examine the movie with a repeat broadcast.  

 

Currently, the way they are just throwing titles together, like the films about pirates, is so general and random that if you do not like pirates, you can quickly avoid the whole batch and TCM loses your viewership for a large portion of the month.  I guess what I am saying is that they are making the Friday Night Spotlight too centered on genre.  But if you looked at a filmmaking style or process (related to color, sound, costume design, whatever) the series could work across multiple genres and attract a more diverse audience, including the ones who have seen the titles many times previously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TB, I like the idea of some technical spotlights - they could easily replace "Pirates," but I'd still want more of the sort they do now.

Remember when they spent a month focusing on Jack Cardiff's cinematography?  That went over very well. So I don't see how they can't do more technique-based spotlights.  It shouldn't all be centered on genre, because as I said previously, if it happens to be a genre the viewer doesn't like too much, then you have excluded him (or her) from a whole month's offerings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

No problem.  TCM (and its various platforms) have the potential to educate as well as entertain.  Why not use the Friday Night Spotlight to help educate people about filmmaking and its more inspired techniques.  This way, even with often-played/often-seen titles, people can find something new in the text of the film they may have missed before.  It gives them a reason to stay tuned to TCM and re-examine the movie with a repeat broadcast.  

 

Currently, the way they are just throwing titles together, like the films about pirates, is so general and random that if you do not like pirates, you can quickly avoid the whole batch and TCM loses your viewership for a large portion of the month.  I guess what I am saying is that they are making the Friday Night Spotlight too centered on genre.  But if you looked at a filmmaking style or process (related to color, sound, costume design, whatever) the series could work across multiple genres and attract a more diverse audience, including the ones who have seen the titles many times previously.

 

I second the idea of featuring filmmaking style or process over genre.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I guess what I am saying is that they are making the Friday Night Spotlight too centered on genre.  But if you looked at a filmmaking style or process (related to color, sound, costume design, whatever) the series could work across multiple genres and attract a more diverse audience, including the ones who have seen the titles many times previously.

 

 

I did enjoy the Spotlight on costume design --- although a lot of that was because I liked the movies that were selected. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Updated with September 2014 subject

 

2013
 
April - Women in Movies (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Film Noir (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (?)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I 
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
Septrmber - Pre-Code Classics

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Updated with September 2014 topic

 

2013
 
April - Women in Movies (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Film Noir (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I 
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Classic Pre-code
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Updated with July 2014 host

 

2013
 
April - Women in Movies (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Film Noir (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I (Wesley Clark)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Classic Pre-code
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Updated with October 2014 topic

 

2013
 
April - Women in Movies (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)
May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)
June - Film Noir (Eddie Mueller)
July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)
October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)
November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)
December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)
 
2014 
 
January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)
February - none (31 Days of Oscar)
March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)
April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)
May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)
June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)
July - 100th Anniversary of World War I (Wesley Clark)
August - none (Summer Under the Stars)
September - Classic Pre-code
October - Films set in Africa
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
Revised 8/3/14

 

2013

 

April - A Woman's World  (Cher, co-host with Robert Osborne)

May - Second Looks (Illeana Douglas)

June - Noir Writers (Eddie Mueller)

July - Francois Truffault (David Edelstein)

August - none (Summer Under the Stars)

September - Future Shock (Michael Phillips)

October - Horror Movies (Bill Hader)

November - Screwball Comedies (Matthew Broderick)

December - Costume Design (Debrorah Nadoolman Landis)

 

2014 

 

January - Science in the Movies (Sean Michael Carrol)

February - none (31 Days of Oscar)

March - Food in the Movies (Anthony Bourdain)

April - none (TCM 20th Anniversary)

May - Australian Cinema (Jacki Weaver)

June - Pirate Movies (Greg Proops)

July - 100th Anniversary of World War I (Wesley Clark)

August - none (Summer Under the Stars)

September - Classic Pre-code

October - Films set in Africa

November- Road Movies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can edit revisions into your original post, in case you didn't know. You might prefer to do it this way, but the original post is always easy to find, and it would be a bit of a space-saver.

 

And, by the way, last December's spotlight was named "The Hollywood Costume," as the hostess had a book of the same name that she was promoting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...