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Last Sunset - Did You Spot Who I Saw In It?


TomJH
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Watched this minor 1961 western, most noteworthy in my opinion, for Kirk Douglas' flashy performance, and the final dramatic shootout.

 

Someone else I noticed in the production, though, and I wonder how many else noticed him, as well. And that was Jose Torvay (no, I had never heard of him before either, I had to look up the name, but I certainly recognized the face).

 

He was one of the two Mexicans on Dorothy Malone's ranch at the beginning of the film, who tags along for the cattle drive and doesn't do much more than play the guitar and watch the proceedings. But I knew I recognized his face.

 

After the film ended it then hit me - he was one of the two cohorts of the Gold Hat Bandit (Alfonso Bedoya) who knocked off Bogart at the end of Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

 

(If I knew how to post pix on these new message boards I'd try to do so to prove my point).

 

Anyone else notice him?

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I only watched a few minutes of this film, I get the impression that in spite of a  high powered cast the whole is less than the sum of the parts.  The contrast of acting styles between the two lead actors is rather obvious.  My attention was mainly focused on Dorothy Malone ;)

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The contrast of acting styles between the two lead actors is rather obvious. 

That contrast in acting styles is even reflective in their on screen walks - Kirk's strut versus Rock's amble.

 

You should have stuck around for the gunfight at the end, mrroberrts.

 

SPOILERS ALERT:

 

While it got some sympathy for Douglas at the end, for the life of me I don't know why his character turned self sacrificial.

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TreasureBandits.jpg

Thanks for the pix, Fred, but this isn't Jose Torvay. He was the Gold Hat's other charming compatriot at the end of Treasure who also appeared in The Last Sunset. Mind you, it's nice to see this shot of a friendly humanitarian character with such a nice smiling face. ;)

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Finally I got a pix posted. This is an image of Jose Torvay, that engaging compatriot behind the beaming Alfonso. And he's also in The Last Sunset, though I rather doubt that many noticed him.

 

Good to see a friendly face again, isn't it?

 

The-Treasure-of-the-Sierra-Madre-Gold-Ha

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This has nothing to do with all the other comments, but I thought it was interesting.  In the novel, the Carol Lynley character is barely mentioned.  And the part about her being Kirk Douglas' daughter was made up for the movie.

 

 

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 In the novel, the Carol Lynley character is barely mentioned.  And the part about her being Kirk Douglas' daughter was made up for the movie.

 

Well that and Kirk's performance are the two most interesting things in the film, so the novel must have been pretty boring

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After Dorothy Malone breaks the tender news to O'Malley, just how does he go about telling Carol Lynley that she's fallen in love with her own dad and vice versa? So to spare her being traumatized Douglas decides to get knocked off by Hudson.  :)

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After Dorothy Malone breaks the tender news to O'Malley, just how does he go about telling Carol Lynley that she's fallen in love with her own dad and vice versa? So to spare her being traumatized Douglas decides to get knocked off by Hudson.  :)

Glad that the sight of Douglas lying dead at her feet won't traumatize the young Lynley at all. ;)

 

In any event, it gave the reprobate character Douglas played the chance to act "noble." I guess it looks better on him than taking off with someone young enough to be his daughter who, opps, may actually be his daughter.

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Finally I got a pix posted. This is an image of Jose Torvay, that engaging compatriot behind the beaming Alfonso. And he's also in The Last Sunset, though I rather doubt that many noticed him.

 

 

Is this him in BORDER INCIDENT?

 

mitchell-and-montalban.jpg

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Glad that the sight of Douglas lying dead at her feet won't traumatize the young Lynley at all. ;)

 

In any event, it gave the reprobate character Douglas played the chance to act "noble." I guess it looks better on him than taking off with someone young enough to be his daughter who, opps, may actually be his daughter.

Well, Douglas obviously intended the primroses to soften the blow. :lol:  Don't get me wrong, I agree that the ending is stupid too. 

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Expletive deleted Joseph Breen and the Production Code forced him to do it, most likely.

 

I have to agree with you.  The ending just didn't add up.   All he had to do was go back to Mexico.   If the Code required the Douglas character to be punished for his crimes (I guess he did murder someone),  than just have him killed by bandits.     While the film was only OK,   Douglas does give a very fine performance.

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I have to agree with you.  The ending just didn't add up.   All he had to do was go back to Mexico.   If the Code required the Douglas character to be punished for his crimes (I guess he did murder someone),  than just have him killed by bandits.    

I guess that Kirk had to pay the price for past indiscretions moreso than anything we actually see him do during the film. (Okay, he slaps Malone across the face but that hardly requires a code-mandated death penalty as retribution).

 

Did he actually murder anybody? I assume so since Hudson as a lawman is coming after him. The fact, though, that the audience doesn't actually see Douglas do anything particularly nasty (even if he does have tight black outfited bad boy written all over him, certainly as far as Malone is concerned) would probably give it mixed feelings about his character dying.

 

But, logically, for Kirk to decide to go noble and give up his life by playing a 19th Century version of suicide-by-cop is just plain dumb. (Too bad Rock was such a good shot).

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I guess that Kirk had to pay the price for past indiscretions moreso than anything we actually see him do during the film. (Okay, he slaps Malone across the face but that hardly requires a code-mandated death penalty as retribution).

 

Did he actually murder anybody? I assume so since Hudson as a lawman is coming after him. The fact, though, that the audience doesn't actually see Douglas do anything particularly nasty (even if he does have tight black outfited bad boy written all over him, certainly as far as Malone is concerned) would probably give it mixed feelings about his character dying.

 

But, logically, for Kirk to decide to go noble and give up his life by playing a 19th Century version of suicide-by-cop is just plain dumb. (Too bad Rock was such a good shot).

 

It wasn't that Rock was such a good shot but that Kirk's gun had no bullets.     Too me it was implied during the film that Kirk was faster than Rock and in a 'fair' fight Rock was a goner.     So I wasn't surpirsed by the ending at all.   I knew Rock wasn't going to die (that would have been too dark)  so once it was clear there was going to be a showdown and Kirk opened his gun,  I knew right than,  he had no bullets in it.

 

Right after Malone tell Douglas that he is the girl's father,  I felt I had the ending laid out.   That Malone would tell Rock this and that he couldn't kill the girl's father or even arrest him since that would lead to his death.     Instead we get this lame ending that only makes sense based on the Code.

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It wasn't that Rock was such a good shot but that Kirk's gun had no bullets. 

By Rock being a good shot, I meant that he was good enough to kill Kirk, rather than just wound him.

 

Mind you, not that I should be dissecting things like this, but, since Rock had indicated to Malone shortly before the gunfight that he had mellowed in his feelings about Douglas, maybe he was, in reality, just trying to wound him. If that's the case, then I amend my original statement to "Too bad Rock was such a bad shot." 

 

Whatever. Bottom line is still the same, "So long, Kirk. It was nice knowin' ya."

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By Rock being a good shot, I meant that he was good enough to kill Kirk, rather than just wound him.

 

Mind you, not that I should be dissecting things like this, but, since Rock had indicated to Malone shortly before the gunfight that he had mellowed in his feelings about Douglas, maybe he was, in reality, just trying to wound him. If that's the case, then I amend my original statement to "Too bad Rock was such a bad shot." 

 

Whatever. Bottom line is still the same, "So long, Kirk. It was nice knowin' ya."

 

Well Rock didn't know Kirk's gun wasn't loaded so it would have been foolish for Rock to only try to wound Kirk.  That is how one ends up dead.     Rock did play it fair.    That gun Kirk had could only hit a target within 10 feet or so.   Anyhow as you said a somewhat trumped up ending.   

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I guess that Kirk had to pay the price for past indiscretions moreso than anything we actually see him do during the film. (Okay, he slaps Malone across the face but that hardly requires a code-mandated death penalty as retribution).

 

I saw it as Kirk not being able to handle it once he realized that

 

A) He couldn't tell she was his daughter

 

B) He couldn't handle that he had carnal thoughts about his own daughter. This was a guy who had an excuse for everything that he did, going way back to his early days with Malone. But this he couldn't rationalize and quite possibly, he knew that now that he had the itch, the only way to get rid of it was to die as he could possibly see himself finding an excuse were he to do the nasty with his daughter.

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He couldn't handle that he had carnal thoughts about his own daughter. This was a guy who had an excuse for everything that he did, going way back to his early days with Malone. But this he couldn't rationalize and quite possibly, he knew that now that he had the itch, the only way to get rid of it was to die as he could possibly see himself finding an excuse were he to do the nasty with his daughter.

That's an interesting intrepretation, clore. I suppose there is enough ambiguity to Douglas' behaviour at the end that you could make a case along those lines.

 

Since Douglas was also producer of the film, I saw it more as an opportunity by him to gain some audience sympathy for his character (though, of course, this is also an actor who in the past had never shied away from portraying a screen louse).

 

He sure managed to steal the film from Rock Hudson, though.

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