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No Programming In Remembrance of D-Day?


JoeMastro
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Today was my parents' 50th wedding anniversary. (Seriously, they were married on June 6, 1964.) TCM was obviously marking that momentous occasion by showing all these wedding-themed movies.

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i thought this skip was poor judgment considering the lame "wedding" movie selections made for daytime broadcast. the ranks of WWII vets, especially those involved with the D-Day landings, are getting pretty thin and a commemoration of some sort should have been scheduled on the 70th anniversary. the three day Memorial Day Marathon was overdoing it, and nothing for D-Day is perplexing.

 

just sayin'...

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I know that Memorial Day just passed, but it would've been nice for the programmers at TCM to have at least acknowledged the 70th anniversary of D-Day...some of us still remember.

I think somehow these saccharine depictions of fantasy married life in the 1940s - which, disastrously, many men and women believed marriage was actually supposed to be and resulted in the dysfunctional realities of the resulting decades - were supposed to be an homage to those who stormed the beaches at Normandy.

 

They weren't. They did, however, give me the oppotunity to save on electricity. :D

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I know that Memorial Day just passed, but it would've been nice for the programmers at TCM to have at least acknowledged the 70th anniversary of D-Day...some of us still remember.

I've been watching "D-Day in HD" (2014) on the History channel.  It's very good and the second part plays tonight.  I myself can't complain about any programming because I have been VERY busy working on the house and 2 electronic projects - don't have much time for TV or the boards.  :mellow:

 

http://www.pressherald.com/2014/06/06/a-maine-soldier-rejoins-fallen-comrades-tells-his-d-day-story-on-history-channel/

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I think TCM did a good job over Memorial Day weekend and since almost every other network was doing D-Day programming for June 6th, I can't find fault in them doing alternative programming. Besides, if I wanted to remember the heros of WWII and I did because my Dad was one of them, I'd much rather remember them by watching something like the History Channel that uses actual combat footage which shows the real horror of what they went through instead of the make believe and santized Hollywood version of war.

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I think TCM did a good job over Memorial Day weekend and since almost every other network was doing D-Day programming for June 6th, I can't find fault in them doing alternative programming. Besides, if I wanted to remember the heros of WWII and I did because my Dad was one of them, I'd much rather remember them by watching something like the History Channel that uses actual combat footage which shows the real horror of what they went through instead of the make believe and santized Hollywood version of war.

Agree.  All WW II movies on Memorial Day was enough for a while.  Another factor with programming is that some of the better WW II movies are very long, e.g. The Longest Day and A Bridge Too Far.

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I agree.

 

Today I just discovered a channel on DirecTV, H2, airing D-Day and WWII documentaries tonight through the early hours.

 

 

H2 use to be called History Channel 2 and DirecTV has carried it for several years.

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H2 use to be called History Channel 2 and DirecTV has carried it for several years.

Thanks very much for the info, markfp2.  I channel surf fairly often, but somehow this passed me by, or I passed it by, or something like that!

 

My father also served in WWII, in the Army Air Corps.

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Still, in all, if TCM can show NORTH BY NORTHWEST umpteen times a year, an annual showing of THE LONGEST DAY only on D-Day isn't too much to ask.  Is it?

 

Sepiatone

I ended up watching my DVD of THE LONGEST DAY over the weekend, after reading a lot of news coverage of the 70th anniversary ceremonies and stories about some of the veterans.  While there may be more realistic war (or D-Day) movies, I like THE LONGEST DAY a great deal because it not only featured veterans of the war but also was made for an audience consisting mostly of people who either participated in or, at least, lived through the war.  The makers of the movie were trying to portray D-Day in a way that would resonate with the people who knew the historical events either firsthand or, at least, through immediate news reports at the time they were taking place.  More modern recountings of the same events, even if more realistic, will never have that same quality of being the truth of the story to the people who lived it.

 

Now, maybe some D-Day veterans would say that THE LONGEST DAY didn't capture their own experience and wasn't a very reliable story of the events for that reason.  And they'd be right, of course.  But, for me, the movie successfully conveyed the momentous nature of the events, making me want to learn more about the history.  (For example, I've just started listening to the full 24-hour coverage on CBS radio of the D-Day events as they happened: https://archive.org/details/Complete_Broadcast_Day_D-Day .)

 

And there's an element of nostalgia for me in that movie, too.  Not nostalgia for the war, because it ended over a decade before I was born.  Nostalgia for a time when they made movies like this one, which was part of my lifetime, when you could go to the theatre and see a movie that was made mainly for an audience who lived through that time.  I'm a bit sad that the generation who knew World War II firsthand are growing fewer in number.

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Thanks very much for the info, markfp2.  I channel surf fairly often, but somehow this passed me by, or I passed it by, or something like that!

 

My father also served in WWII, in the Army Air Corps.

The way the networks change their names and programing it's a wonder that anybody can figure what they are all about and it's easy to skip over one called H2. Now that you've found it, I hope you enjoy it like I usually do.

 

My dad was in the Air Corp. during WWII, based in England. He was a gunner on a bomber. Like many others who went through that he'd never talk about it so I can only imagine horrible it must have been for, not only, him but for all the crews.

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My dad served in the Army Air Corps too, in the Pacific. He enlisted and wanted to be a pilot. But, when they found out that he was colorblind, they wanted him to be a bombardier, because he could see through camouflage. He told me that he didn't think there would be too many jobs for bombardiers after the war. So, he became a mechanic. After the war, he studied engineering. Eventually, he became VP of operations for an oil company. I remember once, back in the mid 50s, some kid threw a firecracker in our back screen door, near where my dad was sitting. When it went off, he dove under the table so fast it was a blur! It was a built in reaction, from WWII.

 

I DVRed H2's D-Day in color HD and will watch it soon.

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The way the networks change their names and programing it's a wonder that anybody can figure what they are all about and it's easy to skip over one called H2. Now that you've found it, I hope you enjoy it like I usually do.

 

My dad was in the Air Corp. during WWII, based in England. He was a gunner on a bomber. Like many others who went through that he'd never talk about it so I can only imagine horrible it must have been for, not only, him but for all the crews.

I look forward to watching it.  If I can remember!

 

Oh, I have such respect for men like your father and dad.  Mine rarely talked about it either, though lately he's been telling a few stories.  Hard to imagine what they were exposed to at such an early age.  

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My dad served in the Army Air Corps too, in the Pacific. He enlisted and wanted to be a pilot. But, when they found out that he was colorblind, they wanted him to be a bombardier, because he could see through camouflage. He told me that he didn't think there would be too many jobs for bombardiers after the war. So, he became a mechanic. After the war, he studied engineering. Eventually, he became VP of operations for an oil company. I remember once, back in the mid 50s, some kid threw a firecracker in our back screen door, near where my dad was sitting. When it went off, he dove under the table so fast it was a blur! It was a built in reaction, from WWII.

 

I DVRed H2's D-Day in color HD and will watch it soon.

It's fascinating to hear the various experiences of the men who served, and what followed them after the war.  They carried so much with them that they kept to themselves.  Your poor dad, to have that reaction.

 

It was pretty hard to watch some of the programming, but I'm glad they showed it all.  They should never be forgotten.

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