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2001: A Space Odyssey & Ice Station Zebra


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Our eyes don't work like that in real life. We never see life in front of us as a smilebox.

 

The distortion comes from sitting too far back in a curved screen theater.

 

Set up closer to the screen and there is no smilebox effect.

 

The screen is not narrow in the middle and wide on both sides. That is an illusion if we sit too far back in a theater.

 

And we don't need to see a 70 mm film on a TV screen, since 35 mm works just fine.

 

Better yet is 4:3, like Gone with the Wind and Drums along the Mohawk, so we can see the sky above us and the ground below the actors, and their legs too. We do not need to see the sky cut out and the tops of their heads cut off and the bottoms of their legs missing.

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Our eyes don't work like that in real life. We never see life in front of us as a smilebox.

 

The distortion comes from sitting too far back in a curved screen theater.

 

Set up closer to the screen and there is no smilebox effect.

 

The screen is not narrow in the middle and wide on both sides. That is an illusion if we sit too far back in a theater.

 

And we don't need to see a 70 mm film on a TV screen, since 35 mm works just fine.

 

Better yet is 4:3, like Gone with the Wind and Drums along the Mohawk, so we can see the sky above us and the ground below the actors, and their legs too. We do not need to see the sky cut out and the tops of their heads cut off and the bottoms of their legs missing.

Fred. ever wondered why they went though the trouble to blow up the dull 35mm "Starman" (1984) to 70mm?  This certainly was a waste of money!

starman.jpg

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Better yet is 4:3, like Gone with the Wind and Drums along the Mohawk, so we can see the sky above us and the ground below the actors, and their legs too. We do not need to see the sky cut out and the tops of their heads cut off and the bottoms of their legs missing.

 

Oh gosh! Here we go again with that whole "Directors couldn't have made wide screen movies back in the day because that would have cut-off all the head and/or feet is they did" Theory o' Fred's again.

 

PLEASE, would somebody, ANYBODY here('cause Fred has me on his ignore function) once again attempt to get good ol' Fred here to understand that GWTW and every OTHER flick ever made COULD HAVE been done in Wide Screen format IF its director would have ONLY told his Cinematographer to FRAME EVERYBODY'S head and feet within the freakin' movie and depending upon the particular shot's "intent" for the audience?!!!

 

(...yeah, I know...a waste of time, huh...never mind) LOL

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Oh gosh! Here we go again with that whole "Directors couldn't have made wide screen movies back in the day because that would have cut-off all the head and/or feet is they did" Theory o' Fred's again.

 

PLEASE, would somebody, ANYBODY here('cause Fred has me on his ignore function) once again attempt to get good ol' Fred here to understand that GWTW and every OTHER flick ever made COULD HAVE been done in Wide Screen format IF its director would have ONLY told his Cinematographer to FRAME EVERYBODY'S head and feet within the freakin' movie and depending upon the particular shot's "intent" for the audience?!!!

 

(...yeah, I know...a waste of time, huh...never mind) LOL

 

Some people have their hobby horses.  And they will ride them.

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