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These Hammer noirs are pretty good!


FredCDobbs
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Wow, the second one was good too!

 

An innocent guy gets into a lot of trouble without doing anything wrong!

 

Notice how the pace began to speed up as time passed, and at the end it was really moving fast and changing scenes and settings rapidly.

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I'm finding it hard to believe that the same director, Terence Fisher, made MAN BAIT, STOLEN FACE, and THE UNHOLY FOUR...the last one being so much more stodgy and stage-y than the other two. Perhaps the budget for the latter was substantially less than for the other two, because it certainly feels to me as if the production values are quite a bit lower in it, and with the very scant use of a musical score in many scenes giving me this impression in particular.

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_blackout_, _man bait_ and _stolen face_ are fortunately available at my local public library.

 

however, i missed _the unholy four_ (i had to go cardio).

 

nevertheless, i made certain that i did not miss _never take candy from a stranger_.

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I'm finding it hard to believe that the same director, Terence Fisher, made MAN BAIT, STOLEN FACE, and THE UNHOLY FOUR...the last one being so much more stodgy and stage-y than the other two. Perhaps the budget for the latter was substantially less than for the other two, because it certainly feels to me as if the production values are quite a bit lower in it, and with the very scant use of a musical score in many scenes giving me this impression in particular.

Yes, I think THE UNHOLY FOUR betrays its B-budget more than the others-- but they were all economically made. 

 

I liked watching Dane Clark drive on the other side of the road. I wonder how long he lived over there. Of all the Hollywood actors who did these Hammer films, he seems the least Hollywood and the most adaptable to the British culture.

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I liked Man Bait better than Blackout, but I'm glad I'm getting all the overnights for later viewing.   What a great change of pace from the bland prime time fare we've been getting lately.

Yes, I did too. Couldnt stay up to watch the rest, but I was able to record them for future viewing.

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Yes, I did too. Couldnt stay up to watch the rest, but I was able to record them for future viewing.

I've had no TV for 5 days. I have a reception problem which apparently can only be corrected by the original remote that came with the TV, rather than the one that Comcast gave me. Since I couldn't find it, I had to order a new one to be shipped. Stay tuned.

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I've had no TV for 5 days. I have a reception problem which apparently can only be corrected by the original remote that came with the TV, rather than the one that Comcast gave me. Since I couldn't find it, I had to order a new one to be shipped. Stay tuned.

 

LOL. The couch ate your remote???

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i saw the first two and the last two, but z'd out on the middle two. i really liked Dane Clark in Blackout and Never Take Candy (Sweets) From a Stranger. (not so sure that Candy was a noir, though) Man Bait was so-so, but a welcome change-up to the usual programming. Hands of the Ripper seemed out of place and was a Hammer Horror flik from their high-flying Gothic/Horror output.

 

i really wanted to see but missed Paul Henreid in Stolen Face, but maybe some other time.

 

as i was looking up some of these titles i saw they are part of Hammer Noir DVD's with at least 6 movies per set. one of the movies in the Hammer collection shown previously on TCM but (whew!) not shown last night was The Snorkle. that movie is "so bad it's good" and would make a good selection for The Underground.

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i saw the first two and the last two, but z'd out on the middle two. i really liked Dane Clark in Blackout and Never Take Candy (Sweets) From a Stranger. (not so sure that Candy was a noir, though) Man Bait was so-so, but a welcome change-up to the usual programming. Hands of the Ripper seemed out of place and was a Hammer Horror flik from their high-flying Gothic/Horror output.

 

i really wanted to see but missed Paul Henreid in Stolen Face, but maybe some other time.

 

as i was looking up some of these titles i saw they are part of Hammer Noir DVD's with at least 6 movies per set. one of the movies in the Hammer collection shown previously on TCM but (whew!) not shown last night was The Snorkle. that movie is "so bad it's good" and would make a good selection for The Underground.

 

LOL. I knew there must be a commercial tie in somehow.......

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Re STOLEN FACE...

 

Did anyone else who watched it last night feel like maybe the screenwriter might have taken a copy of Shaw's PYGMALION and a copy of Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE, placed them both in a Cuisinart, set it on "blend", and then poured the results on a clear sheet of paper? Or was that just me???

 

Actually, not a bad movie at all...well, except for the much too "convenient" ending, anyway.

 

I'm not a big Lizabeth Scott fan, but I thought she was as good in it, and especially when playing the cockney bad girl who the always reliable(well, when he's NOT tryin' to play a pirate, anyway) Henreid settles for.

 

And I thought of all the Terence Fisher directed films shown last night, THIS one was his best effort with the camera. 

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Re STOLEN FACE...

 

Did anyone else who watched it last night feel like maybe the screenwriter might have taken a copy of Shaw's PYGMALION and a copy of Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE, placed them both in a Cuisinart, set it on "blend", and then poured the results on a clear sheet of paper? Or was that just me???

 

Actually, not a bad movie at all...well, except for the much too "convenient" ending, anyway.

 

I'm not a big Lizabeth Scott fan, but I thought she was as good in it, and especially when playing the cockney bad girl who the always reliable(well, when he's NOT tryin' to play a pirate, anyway) Henreid settles for.

 

And I thought of all the Terence Fisher directed films shown last night, THIS one was his best effort with the camera. 

I think it was his best film because Lizabeth Scott is probably the best of the bunch we saw last night. She has an enigmatic, lyrical way of interpreting her characters.  She is able to take mediocre scripts and really put it over. I've never seen her give a bad performance in anything.

 

When she's naughty, she's kind of decent. And when she's decent, she's kind of naughty.  

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Re STOLEN FACE...

 

Did anyone else who watched it last night feel like maybe the screenwriter might have taken a copy of Shaw's PYGMALION and a copy of Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE, placed them both in a Cuisinart, set it on "blend", and then poured the results on a clear sheet of paper?...

 

 

Yes, Darg, but there was more than that in the blender.

 

I kept thinking it was a fascinating smoothie (to continue the blender analogy) of , yes Pygmalion, but also Vertigo (the second half), Hollow Triumph (also known as The Scar ),  A Woman's Face, and maybe even a hint of The Seventh Veil.

Oh, and maybe just a tiny touch of Dark Passage.

 

But especially Vertigo. Hollow Triumph (aka The Scar) has Paul Henreid as the facial surgery patient, playing the double role.

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Yes, Darg, but there was more than that in the blender.

 

I kept thinking it was a fascinating smoothie (to continue the blender analogy) of , yes Pygmalion, but also Vertigo (the second half), Hollow Triumph (also known as The Scar ),  A Woman's Face, and maybe even a hint of The Seventh Veil.

Oh, and maybe just a tiny touch of Dark Passage.

 

But especially Vertigo. Hollow Triumph (aka The Scar) has Paul Henreid as the facial surgery patient, playing the double role.

 

Yep, good points, MissW...especially the VERTIGO thing, as Jimmy Stewart pretty much does and has the same motives for his actions in "pygmalion-izing" Kim NOVAK as Henreid had with Scott in this one.

 

(...ya know, I KNEW I was missin' a few key "ingredients" in my little "recipe" here....thanks!) 

 

***edited due to changing Kim from a "Hunter" to a "Novak"...just caught this while re-reading my post*** 

Edited by Dargo
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I think it was his best film because Lizabeth Scott is probably the best of the bunch we saw last night. She has an enigmatic, lyrical way of interpreting her characters.  She is able to take mediocre scripts and really put it over. I've never seen her give a bad performance in anything.

 

When she's naughty, she's kind of decent. And when she's decent, she's kind of naughty.  

 

Scott did fine in this film and it was nice to see a film I hadn't seen before.    

 

As for Scott never giving a bad performance in anything:   well I think she gave a poor performance in I Walk Alone,  but so did Lancaster.    In their scenes togethere I think they both overplay their hands and looked forced.  

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Scott did fine in this film and it was nice to see a film I hadn't seen before.    

 

Scott was really good in this film, especially as the bad girl.

 

I would afraid the doctor would feel compelled to murder her.

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The Vagaries of a Film Career: Paulette Goddard

 

1947 - Goddard is the female lead of Cecil B. DeMille's Unconquered, the biggest box office hit of its year. However, during production she refuses to participate in an action sequence, for fear of injury. Her stand-in will, in fact, be injured, but DeMille is furious at Goddard for her refusal.

 

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Unconquered

 

1952 - After a series of commercial and critical film failures, Goddard pleads with DeMille to be cast in a supporting role in his circus extravaganza, The Greatest Show on Earth. Still angry over the Unconquered incident, DeMille refuses, casting Gloria Grahame instead. The Greatest Show on Earth would be one of the biggest box office successes of its year.

 

1954 - After a series of "B" movie ventures, Goddard travels to England to appear in another "B," The Unholy Four, also known as The Stranger Came Home, aired on TCM this morning. The film dies a quick death at the box office, there are no other film roles for Goddard and she retires from the film industry.

 

(No sad songs for this lady, however, as she would marry novelist Erich Maria Remarque, have a famous jewelry collection and live an international jet set lifestyle).

 

Still, one seriously wonders, if not for the anger of a famous film producer director, what doors a "comeback" role in his circus picture might have opened for her afterward. Admittedly, however, being an aging movie queen in the '50s was not a benefit for an actress best known for her beauty and vivacious personality, rather than acting talents.

 

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The Unholy Four: the end of Goddard's film career. She would do a little TV work afterward and 12 years later appear in one more theatrical release, a supporting role in an Italian production.

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Yes, she was quite a wealthy woman by that point. I think her last acting role was a cameo in the tv movie The Snoop Sisters...I thought it was the Dorothy Lamour role in Show not Grahame?

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The Vagaries of a Film Career: Paulette Goddard

 

 

Unconquered

 

1952 - After a series of commercial and critical film failures, Goddard pleads with DeMille to be cast in a supporting role in his circus extravaganza, The Greatest Show on Earth. DeMille, still angry over the Unconquered incident, DeMille refuses, casting Gloria Grahame instead. The Greatest Show on Earth would be one of the biggest box office successes of its year.

 

1954 - After a series of "B" movie ventures, Goddard travels to England to appear in another "B," The Unholy Four, also known as The Stranger Came Home, aired on TCM this morning. The film dies a quick death at the box office, there are no other film roles for Goddard and she retires from the film industry.

 

 Admittedly, however, being an aging movie queen in the '50s was not a benefit for an actress best known for her beauty and vivacious personality, rather than acting talents.

 

I thought she looked great. I would have been happy to give her a new home. :)

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I think we're oversimplifying the issue of her career decline.  It sounds as if her career was built on DeMille pictures and that is not exactly true. Plus, she had gone to England earlier, while she was still under contract with Paramount, to make AN IDEAL HUSBAND. I think part of the deal is that she was no longer a hungry actress-- she was set financially-- and she wasn't as motivated to reinvent herself in movies like say Joan Crawford was, or to carve out a new path on television like Lucille Ball.

 

The longer you are away, the more you become forgotten. By the end, she was so forgotten, that she couldn't even book a cruise on The Love Boat. (I'm saying that jokingly, but yeah, don't you wonder why some stars like Goddard and Betty Hutton didn't do The Love Boat or Murder, She Wrote when they were still healthy, still had marketable names, and could have worked again?)

 

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Yes, she was quite a wealthy woman by that point. I think her last acting role was a cameo in the tv movie The Snoop Sisters...I thought it was the Dorothy Lamour role in Show not Grahame?

Lamour's film career was in decline at that point, too. Being in THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH didn't open any new doors for her. These women were older and on their way out at Paramount. At this point, the studio was focusing on new starlets they could toss into those Martin & Lewis comedies.  Or someone like Rosemary Clooney or Shirley Booth. They were going in different directions and the gals that had made gobs of money for them in the forties were being phased out.

 

If Paulette had done GREATEST SHOW, it would have been a last hurrah-- probably not something that would have led to a resurgence.

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I think we're oversimplifying the issue of her career decline.  It sounds as if her career was built on DeMille pictures and that is not exactly true. Plus, she had gone to England earlier, while she was still under contract with Paramount, to make AN IDEAL HUSBAND. I think part of the deal is that she was no longer a hungry actress-- she was set financially-- and she wasn't as motivated to reinvent herself in movies like say Joan Crawford was, or to carve out a new path on television like Lucille Ball.

 

 

My point was that at a time when her career was in trouble, Goddard was denied what might well have been a comeback role for her, even if a relatively small one, due to a personal conflict with a powerful director-producer. She would never get that opportunity again and her career continued to decline still further. 

 

If, as you say, she was no longer a hungry actress, why would she have, essentially, pleaded with the man for a role? That couldn't have been easy for her, especially since DeMille had stopped talking to her after the Unconquered fallout. I know that Goddard was a wealthy woman but I'm not exactly certain what her financial circumstances were in the early '50s.

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