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September 2014 on TCM


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Week One

 

9.01 TELLURIDE TRIBUTE

9.02 THE PROJECTED IMAGE

9.03 SOTM MELVYN DOUGLAS

9.04 GUEST PROGRAMMER RICHARD LINKLATER

9.05 FRIDAY NIGHT SPOTLIGHT: CLASSIC PRECODE

9.06 ESSENTIALS: SINGER BIOPICS

9.07 PLANET OF THE APES DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Week Two

 

9.08 BEATRICE LILLIE

9.09 THE PROJECTED IMAGE

9.10 SOTM MELVYN DOUGLAS

9.11 JERRY LEWIS

9.12 FRIDAY NIGHT SPOTLIGHT: CLASSIC PRECODE

9.13 ESSENTIALS: HOUSES OF ILL REPUTE

9.14 BETTE DAVIS VS. MIRIAM HOPKINS

 

Week Three

 

9.15 ROBERT OSBORNE'S PICKS

9.16 THE PROJECTED IMAGE

9.17 SOTM MELVYN DOUGLAS

9.18 GORDON PARKS SR. & JR.

9.19 FRIDAY NIGHT SPOTLIGHT: CLASSIC PRECODE

9.20 ESSENTIALS: BEN HECHT & CHARLES MACARTHUR

9.21 ESTHER WILLIAMS

 

Week Four

 

9.22 BRIGITTE BARDOT

9.23 THE PROJECTED IMAGE

9.24 SOTM MELVYN DOUGLAS

9.25 GEORGE C. SCOTT

9.26 FRIDAY NIGHT SPOTLIGHT: CLASSIC PRECODE

9.27 ESSENTIALS: NEW YORK APARTMENTS

9.28 WHIT STILLMAN

 

Week Five

 

9.29 MAX STEINER

9.30 THE PROJECTED IMAGE

 

 

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Ahh you beat me to it!  I just cleared out my duplicate post!

 

For me personally, the highlights are:

 

Sept 2- William Holden Daytime Theme

Sept 9- Evening theme is post-WWII trauma, including Orson Welles' The Stranger

Sept 15- Evening Bombshell and Words and Music

Sept 16- Lauren Bacall 90th Birthday Daytime Theme

Sept 21- Errol Flynn, Kim (Although I have seen his appearance in this film and all I can think is "really, Errol?"  I realize he probably changed his appearance to fit that of the character from Rudyard Kipling's novel; but still.)

Sept 30- The Hucksters

 

I'm sure there will be more that I'll end up DVR-ing; but upon first glance, this is what stuck out to me.

 

It appears that Fridays all day are dedicated to pre-code films.  I'm guessing that the Friday Night Spotlight is dedicated to pre-code as well.

 

I'm not too familiar with SOTM Melvyn Douglas.  I think the only movie of his I've seen is Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House.

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I'm looking forward to the Friday Night Spotlight of pre-codes.

I see that THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE, SEARCH FOR BEAUTY and BLONDE VENUS are scheduled.

 

It loooks like "The Projected Image" returns in September with films about the Jewish experience. I'm very much looking forward to HESTER STREET and THE CHOSEN.

 

There's also a PLANET OF THE APES double feature scheduled on September 7.

 

September has a lot of American movies from the 1970s---which I love. 

THE BLACK STALLION is scheduled. :)

 

The September 21 weekly schedule is odd.

They have Melvyn Douglas as "Star of the Month" on Wednesday September 24 and then George C. Scott as "Star of the Month" on Thursday September 24.

 

HUD is scheduled for the Melvyn Douglas tribute. I hope this Paramount movie remains on the schedule. Douglas is so good in that movie. And, of course, the movie also features one of my all-time favorites, Brandon deWilde.

WHEN WILL TCM AIR BLUE DENIM with Brandon deWilde and Carol Lynley???

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Whoops, I overlooked the fact that I can see the full schedule. Thanks for the heads up, Holden, now I can uncross my fingers.

 

Wow, 24 hours of pre-code films on Fridays. They're going to have 24 hour festivals in July for WWI movies, as well. Do you think this is going to be a new trend for FNSL days? We may have narrowly missed 24 hours of pirates.

 

Let's see if my enthusiasm for George C. Scott day was premature... hmm, maybe a little, considering half of it is Patton, but The Hospital looks interesting, I don't think I've heard of it.

 

Overall, definitely a month to look forward to. Glad the schedule's up, I was getting tired of looking at August. ;)

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The September 21 weekly schedule is odd.

They have Melvyn Douglas as "Star of the Month" on Wednesday September 24 and then George C. Scott as "Star of the Month" on Thursday September 24.

 

 

George C. Scott's films comprise an evening spotlight. I noticed for the night of Jerry Lewis films it also said SOTM, but that too is incorrect.  There is only one SOTM, and in September it is Melvyn Douglas.

 

The Davis-Hopkins battle is basically a double feature, since they only made two films together.

 

We are seeing a pattern with the post-code programming. Each January they tend to select someone who made a bunch of silents and precodes to counter-balance all the more recent films that play during 31 Days of Oscar in February and March.

 

This time we have the reverse.  They are loading the schedule with a lot of modern films, feeling that people will not complain because of those 24 hour precode marathons on Fridays.  

 

I think the vast TCM viewing audience prefers they concentrate on films made between 1927-1968.  So what we may have is TCM going in one direction, and the core audience on a completely different track.

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Those Friday pre-codes are a mind blower.  My only regret is that I can't induce amnesia and be able to see them all for the first time all over again.  The one I can't remember seeing on TCM before, though it's played plenty of times on Fox, is Clara Bow's Call Her Savage.  That's right up there with The Story of Temple Drake and Safe in Hell as the raunchiest of them all, and if I can remember to do it I'm going to put those three films on the same disk.

 

The best thing about the Bardots is that they've put her earlier movies in prime time and saved the worthless Contempt for the wee hours.  I say "worthless" only because the dubbing is so horrible that I've never been able to watch more than the first 10 minutes of the movie.  Too bad they never released a subtitled version for people who know how to read.

 

Any idea when the full schedule will be posted on one page?  It's also too bad that the monthly schedules can't be in the same format as these daily and weekly ones.

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Any idea when the full schedule will be posted on one page?  It's also too bad that the monthly schedules can't be in the same format as these daily and weekly ones.

I don't know. I posted the links to the weekly schedules, because they seem more reliable. Often in the past, the monthly schedule on one page would be there one minute, then disappear the next. 

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I'd like to think that all these crime and pre-code movies are a belated make-up gift for having been inundated with so many godawful musicals and "family" movies for the past few months, not to mention foisting the likes of John Wayne and Rock Hudson upon us for SOTM. 

 

But then there's always noir after the sunshine, and in the words of my man Jack Webb:  "In America, there's always a tomorrow".  God Bless America, and God Bless TCM. :)

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I'd like to think that all these crime and pre-code movies are a belated make-up gift for having been inundated with so many godawful musicals and "family" movies for the past few months, not to mention foisting the likes of John Wayne and Rock Hudson upon us for SOTM. 

 

But then there's always noir after the sunshine, and in the words of my man Jack Webb:  "In America, there's always a tomorrow".  God Bless America, and God Bless TCM. :)

Realize that people who love musicals and family movies might take the reverse approach to this argument. LOL

 

We do have to admit that some of us lovable message board snobs place noir a bit higher than the average TCM viewer might. Bias. :)

 

TCM seems fair when it comes to selecting films across a variety of genres (with the exception of science fiction which is truly the misbegotten stepchild around here).

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We do have to admit that some of us lovable message board snobs place noir a bit higher than the average TCM viewer might. Bias.

 

Marcy Syms used to say that "an educated consumer is our best customer".  That might explain the bias we have towards noir and pre-codes. ;)   It's the same bias you see in the better remaining repertory movie houses, i.e. a reaction against excessive wholesomeness and production code correctness.

 

TCM seems fair when it comes to selecting films across a variety of genres (with the exception of science fiction which is truly the misbegotten stepchild around here).

 

I'd agree, although I'd substitute foreign films for science fiction movies, which IMO are about as tedious as musicals.  But then no two TCM viewers are ever going to agree on priorities, and besides, what would be the fun if they did? :)

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We do have to admit that some of us lovable message board snobs place noir a bit higher than the average TCM viewer might. Bias.

 

Marcy Syms used to say that "an educated consumer is our best customer".  That might explain the bias we have towards noir and pre-codes. ;)   It's the same bias you see in the better remaining repertory movie houses, i.e. a reaction against excessive wholesomeness and production code correctness.

 

TCM seems fair when it comes to selecting films across a variety of genres (with the exception of science fiction which is truly the misbegotten stepchild around here).

 

I'd agree, although I'd substitute foreign films for science fiction movies, which IMO are about as tedious as musicals.  But then no two TCM viewers are ever going to agree on priorities, and besides, what would be the fun if they did? :)

I am not against production code correctness (I see it as its own 'style' with its own fans), but obviously there are other ways to depict the same stories.  Some films (film endings) were compromised badly by the code-- and some precodes and postcodes would be better if they had a bit more 'correctness.' So this is not a perfect science.

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I am not against production code correctness (I see it as its own 'style' with its own fans), but obviously there are other ways to depict the same stories.  Some films (film endings) were compromised badly by the code-- and some precodes and postcodes would be better if they had a bit more 'correctness.' So this is not a perfect science.

 

Yeah, but I think that on balance it's indisputable than from the standpoint of a screenwriter's integrity it's a pretty lopsided balance.  You might argue that a handful of films under the code were forced into a sort of sublimated sophistication as a way of getting around it, and succeeded in their aims.  Maybe The Lady Eve or Adam's Rib needed such a straitjacket to succeed, though I doubt it.

 

But here's the thing:  Nothing before 1934 was preventing films like The Lady Eve or Adam's Rib from being made, but after 1934 there were hundreds of pre-code titles that never could have passed Pope Breen's censorious eye, and we would have been much the worse without them.  It wasn't just movies like Call Her Savage, Safe in Hell and Baby Face, either.  It was sophisticated comedies like Trouble in Paradise (unpunished thieves) and Red-Headed Woman (homewrecker gets to eat her cake and have it, too) that would have been left in the dustbin.

 

And those code era endings:  Good grief.  If I had a dollar for every Hollywood code era film that wound up with a marriage proposal (or a bickering couple being reunited) in the last two minutes, or a with a snarling criminal being sent off to fry with a priest by his side, I could almost buy the Los Angeles Clippers.  I never fully realized this until I became a TCM devotee and began seeing many hundreds of code era movies instead of just a handful of highlight films.  It's one of the reasons that so many of the foreign films from that era are so much more interesting than the Hollywood product, even if technically they lagged way behind.  Those foreign filmmakers weren't always having to look over their shoulder.

 

Obviously many hundreds of great movies came out of Hollywood in spite of the production code, but that they managed to do this is much more a testament to the genius of the filmmakers than to the code itself.  About the only upside I can see to the code is that it unintentionally brought about a greater appreciation for those pre-code films, as evidenced by the amount of time that TCM and the repertory houses devote to them.

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I think the vast TCM viewing audience prefers they concentrate on films made between 1927-1968.  So what we may have is TCM going in one direction, and the core audience on a completely different track.

 

I'm hoping my minority status will begin to gain ground at some point. I feel that there aren't nearly enough movies of the 70's represented in TCM schedules. It could easily double what it's providing now.

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I am not against production code correctness (I see it as its own 'style' with its own fans), but obviously there are other ways to depict the same stories.  Some films (film endings) were compromised badly by the code-- and some precodes and postcodes would be better if they had a bit more 'correctness.' So this is not a perfect science.

 

Yeah, but I think that on balance it's indisputable than from the standpoint of a screenwriter's integrity it's a pretty lopsided balance.  You might argue that a handful of films under the code were forced into a sort of sublimated sophistication as a way of getting around it, and succeeded in their aims.  Maybe The Lady Eve or Adam's Rib needed such a straitjacket to succeed, though I doubt it.

 

But here's the thing:  Nothing before 1934 was preventing films like The Lady Eve or Adam's Rib from being made, but after 1934 there were hundreds of pre-code titles that never could have passed Pope Breen's censorious eye, and we would have been much the worse without them.  It wasn't just movies like Call Her Savage, Safe in Hell and Baby Face, either.  It was sophisticated comedies like Trouble in Paradise (unpunished thieves) and Red-Headed Woman (homewrecker gets to eat her cake and have it, too) that would have been left in the dustbin.

 

And those code era endings:  Good grief.  If I had a dollar for every Hollywood code era film that wound up with a marriage proposal (or a bickering couple being reunited) in the last two minutes, or a with a snarling criminal being sent off to fry with a priest by his side, I could almost buy the Los Angeles Clippers.  I never fully realized this until I became a TCM devotee and began seeing many hundreds of code era movies instead of just a handful of highlight films.  It's one of the reasons that so many of the foreign films from that era are so much more interesting than the Hollywood product, even if technically they lagged way behind.  Those foreign filmmakers weren't always having to look over their shoulder.

 

Obviously many hundreds of great movies came out of Hollywood in spite of the production code, but that they managed to do this is much more a testament to the genius of the filmmakers than to the code itself.  About the only upside I can see to the code is that it unintentionally brought about a greater appreciation for those pre-code films, as evidenced by the amount of time that TCM and the repertory houses devote to them.

 

Very solid points here especially code era endings.    Often a film will be fairly realistic with regards to how it handles issues subject to the code,  but due to the code the ending is just too neat and tidy. 

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The best thing about the Bardots is that they've put her earlier movies in prime time and saved the worthless Contempt for the wee hours.  I say "worthless" only because the dubbing is so horrible that I've never been able to watch more than the first 10 minutes of the movie.  Too bad they never released a subtitled version for people who know how to read.

 

Andy, TCM has mistakenly shown an English dubbed version of Contempt on a couple of occassions. They do have the correct version, which has been available on DVD since 2002 from Criterion and is currently on Blu-ray from StudioCanal/Lionsgate.

 

Hopefully they trashed the bad version after the second time they accidentally showed it.

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I very much like the Edward Dmytryk lineup on the morning of Sept 4. He was one of my professors. I wish they had included CROSSFIRE, though (since that was the film he was most proud of directing).

I am going to quote myself here (never did that before LOL).  I see that CROSSFIRE is airing later in the month during one of the Projected Images spotlights along with GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT-- so that should be a good evening. September 23rd.

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I am going to quote myself here (never did that before LOL).  I see that CROSSFIRE is airing later in the month during one of the Projected Images spotlights along with GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT-- so that should be a good evening. September 23rd.

Good. I missed part of Agreement when they showed it recently......

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The best thing about the Bardots is that they've put her earlier movies in prime time and saved the worthless Contempt for the wee hours.  I say "worthless" only because the dubbing is so horrible that I've never been able to watch more than the first 10 minutes of the movie.  Too bad they never released a subtitled version for people who know how to read.

 

 

 

 

Why not just learn French?

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The best thing about the Bardots is that they've put her earlier movies in prime time and saved the worthless Contempt for the wee hours.  I say "worthless" only because the dubbing is so horrible that I've never been able to watch more than the first 10 minutes of the movie.  Too bad they never released a subtitled version for people who know how to read.

 

Why not just learn French?

 

It'd be a lot easier to learn French than to learn whatever language they were using in Contempt. If I had to try to identify it, I'd say it came from the ancient kingdom of Garbledonia.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Andy, TCM has mistakenly shown an English dubbed version of Contempt on a couple of occasions. They do have the correct version, which has been available on DVD since 2002 from Criterion and is currently on Blu-ray from StudioCanal/Lionsgate.

 

Hopefully they trashed the bad version after the second time they accidentally showed it.

 

I think the operative word there is "hopefully", but hopefully our wishes will be answered.   And in the meantime those four early Bardots will satiate me.  If the other three are as good as And God Created Woman, I can hardly wait.

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I'm hoping my minority status will begin to gain ground at some point. I feel that there aren't nearly enough movies of the 70's represented in TCM schedules. It could easily double what it's providing now.

 

I also love American movies from the 1970s. 

I like it when they air on TCM and would love to see to more.

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