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Do you have a favorite movie dream house?


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A daunting task to choose just one.  I settled on Windward, the Cornish house on the cliffs above the sea in The Uninvited, 1944, with Ray Milland, Ruth Hussey, and Gail Russell.  Its rambling rooms, high ceilings, grand staircase, ghost, and sun-splashed music room where Ray's character wrote the enchanting Stella by Starlight is just my cup of tea.  Not to mention the quaint village and charming village doctor--if I can wrestle him away from Ruth Hussey, that is.

 

Anyone else have a movie dream house?

 

 

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OK here's me giving in to my inner geek, but I would love to live in Bag End from Lord of the Rings. It just looks so cozy and inviting and comfortable. I think Im a hobbit at heart--I like gardening and peace and quiet and fun with a few close friends and food and drink (and often :) )

 

bagend_zps1e55f084.png

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My dream home is The Winter Palace, Saint Petersburg as it was in the days of Nicholas I. It has been the setting for many movies. 

 

My dreams are never modest. :)

Now that is a dream home!  (Needless to say, servants come with the dream!)

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OK here's me giving in to my inner geek, but I would love to live in Bag End from Lord of the Rings. It just looks so cozy and inviting and comfortable. I think Im a hobbit at heart--I like gardening and peace and quiet and fun with a few close friends and food and drink (and often :) )

 

bagend_zps1e55f084.png

Enchanting, or maybe enchanted!  (I somehow never saw the Hobbit movies.)  It appears to have sort of an Art Nouveau or Arts and Crafts look.  Imagine walking up to that door every day!

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Enchanting, or maybe enchanted!  (I somehow never saw the Hobbit movies.)  It appears to have sort of an Art Nouveau or Arts and Crafts look.  Imagine walking up to that door every day!

Well, Im actually too tall for a hobbit, so it would have to be a custom job...I love the flowers and the stone walk outside and all the warm woodwork inside.

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The cote d'azur villa belonging (at that time) to publisher Pierre Lazareff in Otto Preminger's BONJOUR, TRISTESSE, may be my favorite.  At the time of the filming, it had the most wonderful, giant shutters that opened onto breathtaking views of the Mediterranean sea. 

 

Jeff Stafford's article on the movie:

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/182447|0/Bonjour-Tristesse.html

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The cote d'azur villa belonging (at that time) to publisher Pierre Lazareff in Otto Preminger's BONJOUR, TRISTESSE, may be my favorite.  At the time of the filming, it had the most wonderful, giant shutters that opened onto breathtaking views of the Mediterranean sea. 

 

Jeff Stafford's article on the movie:

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/182447|0/Bonjour-Tristesse.html

Oh, I'd forgotten that!  Idyllic.  I'm off to read the article.

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Just tried to post images of the The Uninvited house and glorious cliffs and sea below, but failed miserably.  Any tips on how to do this?  I captured the image and have it on my desk top, but went wrong after that.

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Just tried to post images of the The Uninvited house and glorious cliffs and sea below, but failed miserably.  Any tips on how to do this?  I captured the image and have it on my desk top, but went wrong after that.

 

You can make it an attachment if it is small. The process requires many steps:

 

You need to use the: "More Reply Options" button below the Reply box. You will then see: "Attach Files" below the new reply box. Click on the: "Choose File" and then navigate to where the image is stored on your computer and select it and: "Open" it. The name of the image will now appear next to the: "Choose File" box. Click the: "Attach This File" button. Then select: "Add to Post" at far right of grey bar which will appear.

 

post-31314-0-07402700-1403835209_thumb.jpg

 

This provides a thumbnail of the image. You may them use: "Preview Post" below Reply box to see the thumbnail. Left-mouse-click on the thumbnail and select: "Open in New Window." You may then copy the url of that image's window and select the: "Image" icon in the control box above the Reply box. Paste the image's url into that to insert the image into the post.

 

post-31314-0-07402700-1403835209.jpg

 

It is sad to say that you must have the thumbnail in the post in order to have the image appear also full-size.

 

A less complicated method is to copy the image to a website so that you may then simply copy the url and use the: "Image" icon in the control box. The website where to you move the image can be your own website or a photo-hosting site.

post-31314-0-07402700-1403835209_thumb.jpg

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You can make it an attachment if it is small. The process requires many steps:

 

You need to use the: "More Reply Options" button below the Reply box. You will then see: "Attach Files" below the new reply box. Click on the: "Choose File" and then navigate to where the image is stored on your computer and select it and: "Open" it. The name of the image will now appear next to the: "Choose File" box. Click the: "Attach This File" button. Then select: "Add to Post" at far right of grey bar which will appear.

 

attachicon.gifBunnyShadow002.jpg

 

This provides a thumbnail of the image. You may them use: "Preview Post" below Reply box to see the thumbnail. Left-mouse-click on the thumbnail and select: "Open in New Window." You may then copy the url of that image's window and select the: "Image" icon in the control box above the Reply box. Paste the image's url into that to insert the image into the post.

 

post-31314-0-07402700-1403835209.jpg

 

It is sad to say that you must have the thumbnail in the post in order to have the image appear also full-size.

 

A less complicated method is to copy the image to a website so that you may then simply copy the url and use the: "Image" icon in the control box. The website where to you move the image can be your own website or a photo-hosting site.

Thanks very much, SansFins, for these instructions.  I'll give it a try when I'm feeling especially clear-headed, should that day come.  As I'm just a step or two above a Luddite, there will be much experimentation.  Thanks again - and I like your example!

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  • 3 weeks later...

My favorites:

 

Brian Keith's ranch home in "The Parent Trap."  It just looks so spacious and comfy.  Plus, it has a gorgeous piece of property attached.  Maureen O'Hara's Boston townhouse, while beautiful, is too stuffy for my tastes.

 

post-28550-0-63918300-1405489334_thumb.jpg

 

James Mason's sprawling South Dakota home in "North By Northwest."  The architecture is just so gorgeous and I love all the gorgeous hardwood that adorns the interior.

 

post-28550-0-64528900-1405489320_thumb.jpg

 

Lauren Bacall's San Francisco townhouse apartment in "Dark Passage."  If I had to live in an apartment, this is the type I'd want.  I love the spiral staircase.

 

post-28550-0-35806600-1405489308_thumb.png

 

I can't find a picture of it to accompany my post; but I'd also pick a castle, like the one from The Adventures of Robin Hood, for example.  Castles always have such cool things: drawbridge, moat, spiral staircases, dungeon, barracks, spires, towers, parapets, arrow slits, secret passages, trap doors... Castles got everything you could possibly want in a home.  Plus, in the case of the 'Robin Hood' castle, who wouldn't want Errol Flynn climbing through their window every night?

 

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However, for a house for me to actually live in; I'm partial to Craftsman bungalow type homes with wrap around porches, arched doorways and built-ins.  I also love dutch doors.  Whenever I get my home, I'm putting in a dutch door.  I know saloon doors are passé, but I think I'm gonna bring them back.  Personally, I'd love to feel like I was walking into an old-timey West saloon each and everytime I went into the kitchen, for example.  I also like passthrough windows.  That way, the person in the kitchen can still interact with others in the house; but the kitchen can stay a separate place.  Plus, if you're mad at everyone, you can just shut the window.  If you're like me and have a TV near the kitchen, you can have the passthrough window open and still watch TV!

post-28550-0-35806600-1405489308_thumb.png

post-28550-0-64528900-1405489320_thumb.jpg

post-28550-0-63918300-1405489334_thumb.jpg

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Here is the house from The Uninvited.

 

It was larger in the movie  If you give it a click it will get a bit bigger. Clearly I need practice at this. :rolleyes:

 

Yes, that is a very nice house as long as it isn't haunted.      Oh,  and stay away from that cliff!  

 

PS:  Stella by Starlight is a very moving and somewhat moody song.  Love it.   But it has proved to be very difficult for me to play.  I've been working on it for over a decage.

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My favorites:

---

 

However, for a house for me to actually live in; I'm partial to Craftsman bungalow type homes with wrap around porches, arched doorways and built-ins.  I also love dutch doors.  Whenever I get my home, I'm putting in a dutch door.  I know saloon doors are passé, but I think I'm gonna bring them back.  Personally, I'd love to feel like I was walking into an old-timey West saloon each and everytime I went into the kitchen, for example.  I also like passthrough windows.  That way, the person in the kitchen can still interact with others in the house; but the kitchen can stay a separate place.  Plus, if you're mad at everyone, you can just shut the window.  If you're like me and have a TV near the kitchen, you can have the passthrough window open and still watch TV!

I am totally with you on the Craftsman bungalow, I love them too, with their intimate coziness about them, though most of the ones I've seen need much rehab and redecorating (not removing the wonderful wood and style, just updating the appliances and the HVAC).   Many Craftsman I've seen have a full size swinging door to the kitchen already, so you may want to try that out before placing your saloon door. Also, in rehab you may get your pass-through to the kitchen yet; I've seen a few that have opened it for that.

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I love very much his apartment in: Jewel Robbery (1932).

 

Parts of it can be seen in this clip:

 

The main room appears to be a large square. The bed chamber and dining chamber are behind large circular openings covered by exquisite drapery. It seems to me to have an oriental feel.

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My favorites:

 

Brian Keith's ranch home in "The Parent Trap."  It just looks so spacious and comfy.  Plus, it has a gorgeous piece of property attached.  Maureen O'Hara's Boston townhouse, while beautiful, is too stuffy for my tastes.

 

attachicon.gifparenttrapranch.jpg

 

James Mason's sprawling South Dakota home in "North By Northwest."  The architecture is just so gorgeous and I love all the gorgeous hardwood that adorns the interior.

 

attachicon.gifnbnw.jpg

 

Lauren Bacall's San Francisco townhouse apartment in "Dark Passage."  If I had to live in an apartment, this is the type I'd want.  I love the spiral staircase.

 

attachicon.gifdarkpassage.png

 

I can't find a picture of it to accompany my post; but I'd also pick a castle, like the one from The Adventures of Robin Hood, for example.  Castles always have such cool things: drawbridge, moat, spiral staircases, dungeon, barracks, spires, towers, parapets, arrow slits, secret passages, trap doors... Castles got everything you could possibly want in a home.  Plus, in the case of the 'Robin Hood' castle, who wouldn't want Errol Flynn climbing through their window every night?

 

---

 

However, for a house for me to actually live in; I'm partial to Craftsman bungalow type homes with wrap around porches, arched doorways and built-ins.  I also love dutch doors.  Whenever I get my home, I'm putting in a dutch door.  I know saloon doors are passé, but I think I'm gonna bring them back.  Personally, I'd love to feel like I was walking into an old-timey West saloon each and everytime I went into the kitchen, for example.  I also like passthrough windows.  That way, the person in the kitchen can still interact with others in the house; but the kitchen can stay a separate place.  Plus, if you're mad at everyone, you can just shut the window.  If you're like me and have a TV near the kitchen, you can have the passthrough window open and still watch TV!

Yes, yes, and yes!  Love those three.  I read something about the North by Northwest house, but can't remember? Was it a Frank Lloyd Wright, by chance?  I must check on that.

 

The Craftsman houses are so special, and I"m with you with those doors.  Unusual doors are so special.  Many years ago I went to an event at a sprawling 1940s (?) house.  The kitchen had double swinging doors with a round windows. I remember being so taken by that.

 

I once rented a pink 1920s studio apartment with a built-in breakfast nook and Murphy bed.  All the doorknobs were of glass.  It also had a (non-working) dumb waiter in the kitchen, and magnificent stove.  I was so happy to see a few years ago that it was still standing, not demolished for condos or offices.

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Yes, that is a very nice house as long as it isn't haunted.      Oh,  and stay away from that cliff!  

 

PS:  Stella by Starlight is a very moving and somewhat moody song.  Love it.   But it has proved to be very difficult for me to play.  I've been working on it for over a decage.

Probably a ghost would prove troublesome. And yes, maybe a low wall along the cliff's edge to deter sleepwalkers.

 

You're playing the song on the guitar, I assume?  I'm sure you'll master it soon.  They sure don't write 'em like that anymore.

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I love very much his apartment in: Jewel Robbery (1932).

 

Parts of it can be seen in this clip:

 

The main room appears to be a large square. The bed chamber and dining chamber are behind large circular openings covered by exquisite drapery. It seems to me to have an oriental feel.

Somehow I can't open the link, but will try again. It sounds fabulous! 

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I am sorry that the link does not work.

 

This is the video:


 

The arrangement of the apartment is shown from: 0:18 to 0:26. 

 

I like very much that the drapery is controlled by electrics. I must wonder if there are separate buttons so as to open them in different arrangements according to mood. 

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I am sorry that the link does not work.
 
 
The arrangement of the apartment is shown from: 0:18 to 0:26. 
 
I like very much that the drapery is controlled by electrics. I must wonder if there are separate buttons so as to open them in different arrangements according to mood. 

 

Many thanks for posting the video.  How sumptuous!  Surely there is a mood arrangement button for the drapery.   :)

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Probably a ghost would prove troublesome. And yes, maybe a low wall along the cliff's edge to deter sleepwalkers.

 

You're playing the song on the guitar, I assume?  I'm sure you'll master it soon.  They sure don't write 'em like that anymore.

 

Yes, I'm playing the song on the guitar.   Yea, I love playing songs from this era.   Friends will comment that I'm playing songs that are over 70 years old.  So what,  they are great,  well written,  beautiful songs.    But some will ask if I can play something more current.    To pull their leg,  I'll start playing Beatles songs.    Then I get;  Hey,  but that song is still over 40 years old.    What can I say,  I don't play no hip-hop!  

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