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Three Colors: Blue (1993), White (1994), Red (1994)


SansFin
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I am very happy that TCM is bringing to us: Krzysztof Kieslowski's: Three Colors: Blue (1993), Three Colors: White (1994) and Three Colors: Red (1994).as TCM Imports this coming Sunday night.

 

These are complex movies in their cinematography, structure and storytelling. 

 

I hope that all who have any interest in movies which are far from mundane will watch them.

 

 

 

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SansFin, I saw all three of these when they first came out. But it seems so long ago (ah, the 90s), I can't recall them in any detail, except that I liked them. Especially the one with Juliette Binoche (Blue, I think), an actress I admire.

It will be good to see them again. I hope I can.

 

edit: Oh, forget it. Not airing in Canada.

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It is sad that these are not available for viewing in Canada.

 

I must assume that their being in French caused some company in Quebec to purchase the broadcast rights.

 

It is in particular sad as one of the replacements is: The Man Who Laughs (1966) which is a horrid presentation of a wonderful story. :(

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I remember going to the CAREFREE THEATER in West Palm Beach, FL, way back when to see 'WHITE'.  To date it's the only foreign film I've ever seen in a theater.  The CAREFREE was one of those small, one-screen theaters that showed 'arty' films and foreign films and indie films at the time.  Also doubled as a comedy club.  I enjoyed 'WHITE' and bought it on video when Miramax released it on tape a couple years later.  I've not seen BLUE or RED . . . yet. 

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Just a bump for Kieslowski's Trilogy on TCM Imports:

 

Roger Ebert article here: http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-three-colors-trilogy-blue-white-red

 

airs late Sun., 6-22

 

2:00 AM Blue (1993)  Premiere

A woman struggles to find a way to live her life after the death of her husband and child.

DirKrzysztof Kieslowski CastJuliette Binoche , Benoit Regent , Florence Pernel .

C-98 mins, Letterbox Format

3:45 AM White (1994) Premiere 

A Polish immigrant wants to get even with his former wife.

DirKrzysztof Kieslowski CastZbigniew Zamachowski , Julie Delpy , Janusz Gajos .

C-92 mins, Letterbox Format

5:30 AM Red (1994)

An accident creates a relationship between a model and a retired judge who spies on his neighbors.

DirKrzysztof Kieslowski CastIrene Jacob , Jean-Louis Trintignant , Federique Feder .

C-99 mins, Letterbox Format

 

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I wish to remind all that these wonderful movies are airing this night.

 

I thank HoldenIsHere for presenting the beautiful graphics.

 

I thank mr6666 for the information presented and in particular the link to the Roger Ebert review. It is wonderful to read and very insightful.

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I think I understand the way that the story of Blue was representing liberty, (in the way that the woman was trying to liberate herself from the memory of her husband and daughter) but I had some trouble understanding how White dealt with equality. After reading the plot of White on Wikipedia and the TCM article I'm surprised that there was so much I didn't follow toward the end.

 

<<Spoiler Alert>> The article said that the equality theme is in Karol's rise in the world of business, followed by taking revenge on his ex-wife. (I didn't gather that he was taking revenge, nor trying to frame her.) It is more vaguely drawn than in the first film where liberty is the whole storyline, but I think I understand how that deals with equality, in a "you stab my back, I'll stab yours" sort of way. Can anyone tell me what Dominique signs to Karol at the very end?

 

Did the old lady at the recycling bin show up again in Red? I didn't stay up for it. I wasn't even planning on watching White, (not being all that taken by Blue, really) but it was so entertaining in the beginning that it hooked me in for the duration. The scene where Karol is playing the comb in the subway seemed like a parody of the man playing the recorder on the street in Blue. That cracked me up. (It's a good thing I saw Blue or I wouldn't have gotten the joke, hah.)

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Can anyone tell me what Dominique signs to Karol at the very end?

 

 

I am very sorry to say that I can not answer your questions because it has been many years since I have had an opportunity to watch the movies. The universe conspired against us watching this airing.

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Kay, I believe the connections with Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity are largely ironic.

 

Blue = Liberty--the kind no one would want to have, with the sudden loss of husband and child.

 

White = Equality. The very unequal relationship is dominated by the gorgeous wife. The husband then finds a way to get revenge on her.

 

Red = Fraternity. Deals with a man whose only connection with other people is spying on them.

 

I'm so glad TCM showed these great films and that so many people enjoyed them. Blue is definitely my favorite, but they are all remarkable.

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