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What rarely shown movies would you like TCM to play???


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rosinryanz For some reason I remembered seeing The Barretts of Wimpole Street ('57 version) being among the titles listed here. I was just now watching Weekend at the Waldorf and saw The Barretts of Wimpole Street listed as coming on at 4 a.m. Eastern time (7/20).

 

On the off-chance you'd be reading I thought I'd post a heads-up. Sorry it couldn't have come a little sooner!

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What about "Lady Sings the Blues" (1972).

 

Others:

"The Night of the Iguana" (1964)

"The Sandpiper" (1965)

"Reflection in a Golden Eye" (1967)

"Honeymoon Hotel" (1964)

"Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967)

"8 1/2" (1963)

"Mom and Dad" (1945)

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Hi Rosinryanz...great choices.

 

FYI...."Reflections in a Golden Eye" will be shown on

TCM on August 19th - which is a day devoted to the greatest actor: Marlon Brando. Can't wait to see some of his films on that day!

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"One Night of Love," one of HOllywood's greatest musicals, took the world by storm in l935. Starring golden-haired diva, Grace Moore, the film was so popular and critically acclaimed, it was nominated for five Oscars and won three for Best Musical Scoring, Best Sound Recording and for Technical Achievement. The movie, the star and the director, Victor Schertzinger, were all nominated as the Best by the Academy. Yet, no one has seen it on TV for decades. I brought my tape years ago but it's a tragedy no young TV viewers today can enjoy this delightful tale of an American girl who goes to Italy to study opera, falls in love with a famed Italian impressario and becomes the star of New York's Metropolitan Opera. Moore is fabulous and is in great voice. This movie daringly devotes much time to sequences from "Carmen" and "Madame Butterfly" which show why Moore was the toast of the opera world. If this movie ever plays anywhere, watch the opening credits where Moore is presented as "Miss Grace Moore." It'd be so wonderful if TCM could show this now forgotten classic just once and let viewers everywhere see for themselves what all the shouting was about back in l935 when "One Night of Love"--an opera movie--was the number one film in box offices across America and then around the world. Moore received countless awards not only in the USA but in Europe for "bringing opera to the masses." One sad note about Moore: she died in a plane crash in l941 while entertaining the American troops. She had come a long, long way from her small home in Jellico, Tenn. to the heights of movie and opera stardom.

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Rosinryans...writes:

 

"Our Dancing Daughters (1928)

The Jazz Singer (1927)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1957)

Queen Christina (1933)

"The Night of the Iguana" (1964)

"The Sandpiper" (1965)

"Reflection in a Golden Eye" (1967)

"Honeymoon Hotel" (1964)

"Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967)

"8 1/2" (1963)

"Mom and Dad" (1945)"

 

Perhaps you haven't had TCM very long b/c with the exception of "Mom and Dad" all of these have played in the last year.

 

And Lanamarilyn29 writes:

 

The Big Parade (1925)

Our Dancing Daughters (1928)

Seven Years Back Luck (1921)

The Eagle (1925)

Tillie?s Punctured Romance (1914)

The Prisoner of Zenda (1922)

 

With the exception of "Seven Years..." all of these play regularly on Silent Sunday evenings. Just keep an eye on the schedule.

 

Finally, "How to Steal a Million" has recently been released on DVD in letterbox. No need to suffer commercials or wait for it to pop up on Fox.

 

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One Night of Love was a Columbia release, so not in the Turner library.

 

On the other hand, "opera movies" sounds like a good theme topic for TCM to consider. They could go back as far as the silent La Boheme, which hasn't played in a long time, and maybe the silent version of Madame Butterfly that played in one of the Archive Treasures special themes, and bring it down to Yes, Giorgio, without having to drift too far from the Turner library.

 

I'm pretty sure this hasn't been used as a theme during the decade that my cable company has carried TCM. Good opportunity for the Grace Moore pic, which I see Leonard Maltin rates at ***1/2 and for which there doesn't seem to be a lot of cable competition.

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THE WINDOW 1949. An excellent thriller about a boy who witnesses a murder while on a fire escape looking into a window. Because he is always making up stories, no one will believe him except the murderers! The movie captures the look and feel of 1949 New York City. It stars Bobby Driscoll as the boy, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy, Paul Stewart and Ruth Roman.

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Hello,

 

I am somewhat confused. For years,I thought ONE NIGHT OF LOVE was with Jeanette Mac Donald and Maurice Chevalier Perhaps I stand corrected! You seem to know what you are talking about. Do you know what the name of the Mac Donald, Chevalier movie is?

Thank you

Terry

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Having an "Opera" theme is a dandy idea, Bollywood. If TCM couldn't license "One Night of Love" from Columbia Studios, then it already has two MGM musicals in its vault that star Grace Moore: "A lady's Morals" (1930) and "New Moon" (1931) the latter one co-starring Laurence Tibbett. This was later remade in l940 with Jeanette McDonald and Nelson Eddy. An inside factoid: McDonald and Grace Moore passionately hated each other. Moore wanted desperately to star in MGM's opulent production of "The Merry Widow" but Irving Thalberg thought Moore was too overweight and he gave the coveted role to McDonald. When Moore's "One Night of Love" created a sensation at the box office, McDonald was furious that MGM hadn't brought the property for her. Either way, through the magic of movies, we have the glorious magic of both divas preserved forever. Now, if only Columbia would just unlock its vaults and send out "One Night of Love" on a deluxe DVD and permit it to be shone on television. I have no doubt it would find an enthusiastic audience.

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Thank you, I'm sure you are correct. Why did all those titles have LOVE ME TONIGHT, LOVE ME FOR AN HOUR or LOVE ME AND LEAVE ME. Very risque-gay for the early thirties.

 

 

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I agree with you. Letter From An Unknown Woman (1948) would be wonderful to see again! Joan Fontaine and Louis Jourdan gave such moving performances in this truly artistic movie. One of the GREATS but unfortunately rarely seen.

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decotoddla...writes:

 

With the exception of "Seven Years..." all of these play regularly on Silent Sunday evenings. Just keep an eye on the schedule.

 

 

I'm going to have to disagree with you on that. I watch Silent Sunday Nights every week. I haven't seen those films in a probably over a year or two (with the exception of Tillie's Punctured Romance). And I keep checking the schedule to see when they'll pop up again and no such luck. Now if I wanted to see The Passion of Joan of Arc (which is a fine movie by the way) it has been on at least three times since last November.

 

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I hate to be the sour-puss on this board, but the topic was "rarely shown" movies.

 

WATERLOO BRIDGE ('40), MR SKEFFINGTON and ARSENIC AND OLD LACE are very frequently shown, especially the latter. I would like to see the '31 verison of WATERLOO BRIDGE.

 

The '36 SHOWBOAT is pretty commonly shown, too as are 8 1/2 and LA DOLCE VITA (watch the Friday night foreign slot).

 

Lana, you may be right on some of the silent titles, but THE BIG PARADE is shown at least a few times a year. Probably most recently during the Memorial Day / May war time films. I'm also pretty sure ZENDA has been shown this last year as well as DANCING DAUGHTERS, a popular Crawford silent.

 

All of the movies people are requesting are quite good. I'm just taking exception to calling them "rarely shown." Especially as so many have pointed out, TCM has a lot of films in their vaults that have not seen the light of day in over 5 years. Yesterday's race car theme included the Elvis version of SPEEDWAY. I would rather have seen the very enjoyable silent gem, SPEEDWAY (from '28) with William Haines and Anita Page.

 

 

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I would LOVE to see:

"The Blue Veil"

"Murder In The Blue Room"

"The Spider Woman Strikes Back"

"The Constant Nymph"

"Letter From An Unknown Woman"

"Ivy"

"Home Sweet Homicide"

"The Ninth Guest"

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Well I really don't have a list but since becoming an advid watcher of TCM in February I have noticed that there are some movies they show over and over again, while others seem to get shelved again for a very long time before they are seen again. I think my suggestion to TCM if I have one is to better utilize their library of classic films. I can't count how many times they have shown Father of The Bride, The Philadelphia Story, Arsenic and Old Lace or The Magnificent Ambersons since I started watching. All good films but there a whole lot of other movies that I know TCM has in thier possession that don't get shown half as much. So that's what I'd like to see them utilize their film library better then they are currently doing.

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