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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Sunday November 14, 2021

Screen Shot 2019-12-07 at 7.07.03 AM.jpeg

Monroe on TCM

the seven year itch

I never tire of this film; I find different scenes to laugh at every time!

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Just now, sagebrush said:

I never tire of this film; I find different scenes to laugh at every time!

It's been awhile since I've seen it. They really should schedule this one with SOME LIKE IT HOT back-to-back since both films feature her directed by Billy Wilder.

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Friday November 26, 2021

Screen shot 2017-12-08 at 1.45.16 PM.png

Lubitsch on TCM

the smiling lieutenant

the merry widow

ninotchka

that uncertain feeling

the shop around the corner

trouble in paradise

design for living

to be or not to be

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Friday November 26, 2021

Lubitsch on TCM

I've been watching Ernst Lubitsch movies on The Criterion Channel, which currently offers a collection of Lubitsch musicals, most of which star Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald.

Because the Musical is not one of my favorite genres, I was wholly ignorant about Lubitsch's parfaits. I was similarly clueless about Chevalier and MacDonald who were primarily in my consciousness as symbols and icons.  The former I knew only as a silver-haired caricature of a Frenchman who was prone to wearing straw boaters, emitting, "Au hau hau haaaauu!" thanking Ay-van for lit-tull girls, and crooning to gorgons*, "Ah, yes! I re-mem-bair eet well!" The latter I knew about only based on creaky operettas in which she would shrilly warble with Nelson Eddy.

The quartet in the Criterion collection are all Pre-Code and delightfully risqué (for their time) -- sexuality and carnality are audaciously yet (comparatively) tastefully celebrated. In One Hour with You, Chevalier throughout breaks the "fourth wall" to conspiratorially and saucily address the audience -- par exemple:

     "Come on, be honest, Mister
     If you saw her turn the light out
     Would you get your hat and get right out
     Now I ask you,
     What would you do . . .?
    
     That's what I did too."

Two revelations to me after watching the Lubitsch musicals: Maurice Chevalier was a horrible actor. Jeanette MacDonald was sexy.

46eb3d660327e40a3a73982bd334c06a.jpg

The Criterion Channel merely mentions "The Lubitsch Touch," a description that I never quite understood and, even after researching, have difficulty identifying.

From Wikipedia:

     "With few exceptions Lubitsch's movies take place neither in Europe nor America but in Lubitschland, a place of metaphor, benign grace, rueful wisdom... What
     came to preoccupy this  anomalous artist was the comedy of manners and the society in which it transpired, a world of delicate sangfroid, where a breach of sexual
     or social propriety and the appropriate response are ritualized, but in unexpected ways, where the basest things are discussed in elegant whispers; of the rapier,
     never the broadsword... To the unsophisticated eye, Lubitsch's work can appear dated, simply because his characters belong to a world of formal sexual protocol.
     But his approach to film, to comedy, and to life was not so much ahead of its time as it was singular, and totally out of any time." -- Lubitsch biographer Scott Eyman

* Oh, the cruel ignominy  of senescence! To have comely coquettes such as MacDonald and Claudette Colbert replaced with Hermione Gingold!

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25 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I've been watching Ernst Lubitsch movies on The Criterion Channel, which currently offers a collection of Lubitsch musicals, most of which star Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald.

Because the Musical is not one of my favorite genres, I was wholly ignorant about Lubitsch's parfaits. I was similarly clueless about Chevalier and MacDonald who were primarily in my consciousness as symbols and icons.  The former I knew only as a silver-haired caricature of a Frenchman who was prone to wearing straw boaters, emitting, "Au hau hau haaaauu!" thanking Ay-van for lit-tull girls, and crooning to gorgons*, "Ah, yes! I re-mem-bair eet well!" The latter I knew about only based on creaky operettas in which she would shrilly warble with Nelson Eddy.

The quartet in the Criterion collection are all Pre-Code and delightfully risqué (for their time) -- sexuality and carnality are audaciously yet (comparatively) tastefully celebrated. In One Hour with You, Chevalier throughout breaks the "fourth wall" to conspiratorially and saucily address the audience -- par exemple:

     "Come on, be honest, Mister
     If you saw her turn the light out
     Would you get your hat and get right out
     Now I ask you,
     What would you do . . .?
    
     That's what I did too."

Two revelations to me after watching the Lubitsch musicals: Maurice Chevalier was a horrible actor. Jeanette MacDonald was sexy.

46eb3d660327e40a3a73982bd334c06a.jpg

The Criterion Channel merely mentions "The Lubitsch Touch," a description that I never quite understood and, even after researching, have difficulty identifying.

From Wikipedia:

     "With few exceptions Lubitsch's movies take place neither in Europe nor America but in Lubitschland, a place of metaphor, benign grace, rueful wisdom... What
     came to preoccupy this  anomalous artist was the comedy of manners and the society in which it transpired, a world of delicate sangfroid, where a breach of sexual
     or social propriety and the appropriate response are ritualized, but in unexpected ways, where the basest things are discussed in elegant whispers; of the rapier,
     never the broadsword... To the unsophisticated eye, Lubitsch's work can appear dated, simply because his characters belong to a world of formal sexual protocol.
     But his approach to film, to comedy, and to life was not so much ahead of its time as it was singular, and totally out of any time." -- Lubitsch biographer Scott Eyman

* Oh, the cruel ignominy  of senescence! To have comely coquettes such as MacDonald and Claudette Colbert replaced with Hermione Gingold!

Those precodes were done when Lubitsch was an in-house director at Paramount.

He later went to MGM then Fox.

I prefer his work in the 40s...THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER (1940), TO BE OR NOT TO BE (1942), HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1943) and CLUNY BROWN (1946). If you get the chance to watch any of those films, do so!

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I wish TCM still put the Shorts on the schedule. I just love that Short where the newlywed husband is saddled with the task of carving the Thanksgiving turkey for the first time as his in laws frown at him. Hilarious! . I got home from work just in time to catch it a few minutes in. If I had known it was going to be airing, I would have set my DVR.

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On 11/25/2021 at 6:13 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I've been watching Ernst Lubitsch movies on The Criterion Channel, which currently offers a collection of Lubitsch musicals, most of which star Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald.

Because the Musical is not one of my favorite genres, I was wholly ignorant about Lubitsch's parfaits. I was similarly clueless about Chevalier and MacDonald who were primarily in my consciousness as symbols and icons.  The former I knew only as a silver-haired caricature of a Frenchman who was prone to wearing straw boaters, emitting, "Au hau hau haaaauu!" thanking Ay-van for lit-tull girls, and crooning to gorgons*, "Ah, yes! I re-mem-bair eet well!" The latter I knew about only based on creaky operettas in which she would shrilly warble with Nelson Eddy.

The quartet in the Criterion collection are all Pre-Code and delightfully risqué (for their time) -- sexuality and carnality are audaciously yet (comparatively) tastefully celebrated. In One Hour with You, Chevalier throughout breaks the "fourth wall" to conspiratorially and saucily address the audience -- par exemple:

     "Come on, be honest, Mister
     If you saw her turn the light out
     Would you get your hat and get right out
     Now I ask you,
     What would you do . . .?
    
     That's what I did too."

Two revelations to me after watching the Lubitsch musicals: Maurice Chevalier was a horrible actor. Jeanette MacDonald was sexy.

46eb3d660327e40a3a73982bd334c06a.jpg

The Criterion Channel merely mentions "The Lubitsch Touch," a description that I never quite understood and, even after researching, have difficulty identifying.

From Wikipedia:

     "With few exceptions Lubitsch's movies take place neither in Europe nor America but in Lubitschland, a place of metaphor, benign grace, rueful wisdom... What
     came to preoccupy this  anomalous artist was the comedy of manners and the society in which it transpired, a world of delicate sangfroid, where a breach of sexual
     or social propriety and the appropriate response are ritualized, but in unexpected ways, where the basest things are discussed in elegant whispers; of the rapier,
     never the broadsword... To the unsophisticated eye, Lubitsch's work can appear dated, simply because his characters belong to a world of formal sexual protocol.
     But his approach to film, to comedy, and to life was not so much ahead of its time as it was singular, and totally out of any time." -- Lubitsch biographer Scott Eyman

* Oh, the cruel ignominy  of senescence! To have comely coquettes such as MacDonald and Claudette Colbert replaced with Hermione Gingold!

I've read that it bombed when released in 1948, but the fantasy musical Lubitsch was directing when he died, That Lady in Ermine, plays much better today.  This past year I borrowed a friend's DVD and found myself laughing in all the right places.  It had the Lubitsch touch up to a point, but after his death it was taken over by the rather heavy handed direction of Otto Preminger.  Ernst Lubitsch was given sole directing credit.

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