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TCM and Other Sources for Classic Film


TopBilled
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6 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Thank you Ando (and others) for mentioning additional classic film sources.

It is very much appreciated!

My pleasure. Here's to another year of great classics! 🍻

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My first classic of 2022...

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Airplane (1980, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams)

The last great airplane epic after a decade full of them - and one of the best Hollywood spoofs ever made (imo). 🙂

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Joseph-Mankiewicz.jpg

The Criterion Channel is featuring 13 of Mank's films starting today (Jan. 1st). They don't (as is their usual practise) have a director feature to accompany the selections. The above YouTube doc, All About Mankiewicz, though in poor visual condition, is the best one I've seen. The films:

  • Dragonwyck, 1946
  • The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, 1947
  • House of Strangers, 1949
  • A Letter to Three Wives, 1949
  • No Way Out, 1950
  • All About Eve, 1950
  • People Will Talk, 1951
  • 5 Fingers, 1952
  • Guys and Dolls, 1955
  • The Quiet American, 1958
  • Suddenly, Last Summer, 1959
  • Cleopatra, 1963
  • There Was a Crooked Man … , 1970

You won't find a better version of these on the web. Criterion has improved considerably on its streaming resolutions since its debut.

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I hadn't noticed The Nicholas Brosthers salute. But only 3 films? The unfortunate thing is that their cameo performances were innumerable but often went uncredited so an IMDb search won't be of much help there.  Looking forward to a great copy of Stormy Weather, though. Thanks, E.

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1 hour ago, ando said:

I hadn't noticed The Nicholas Brosthers salute. But only 3 films? The unfortunate thing is that their cameo performances were innumerable but often went uncredited so an IMDb search won't be of much help there.  Looking forward to a great copy of Stormy Weather, though. Thanks, E.

I agree: a paltry three films is disgracefully paying short shrift to that Dynamic Duo.

I get a major kick out of watching male dancers in "classic" Hollywood movies, The Nicholas Brothers being one of my favorite hoofers. Their "rivals," the similarly phenonmenal Berry Brothers, were every bit the equal of the (seems to me) better-remembered Fayard and Harold. I cannot help but wonder if the members of both acts suffered physical ailments* -- because of their flamboyant, athletic routines -- in their later years. I also cannot help but wince when I watch a stunt such as doing "splits" after jumping off a balcony.

 

* À la Prince Rogers Nelson.

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4 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I agree: a paltry three films is disgracefully paying short shrift to that Dynamic Duo.

I get a major kick out of watching male dancers in "classic" Hollywood movies, The Nicholas Brothers being one of my favorite hoofers. Their "rivals," the similarly phenonmenal Berry Brothers, were every bit the equal of the (seems to me) better-remembered Fayard and Harold. I cannot help but wonder if the members of both acts suffered physical ailments* -- because of their flamboyant, athletic routines -- in their later years. I also cannot help but wince when I watch a stunt such as doing "splits" after jumping off a balcony.

The Berry Bothers were awesome. I remember watching an interview with the Nicholas Brothers in later years (sometime in the 80s) and they didn't look any worse for the wear. Course, they were no longer leaping over sets. That Stormy Weather clip is hard to beat but I admit that my favorite Nicholas Brothers number is from Vincente Minelli's The Pirate, choreographed and performed by/with Gene Kelly. There's that famous story of Kelly scheduling a block of rehearsal time to go over the number with them and getting flummoxed after they performed it perfectly after one demonstration. 

 

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brother_1.jpg  clssyt1.jpg

O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000, Joel & Ethan Coen)

In the deep south during the 1930s, three escaped convicts search for hidden treasure while a relentless lawman pursues them.

A favorite and one of the genuine classics of the new millennium. Great soundtrack. Should run til the end of the month.

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Went looking for a Billy Wilder film on Criterion this morning and found this one -

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People On Sunday (1930, Siodak/Ulmer/Gliese/Siodmak/Zinneman)

Clearly a talented team effort this film captures everyday people out and about in pre-Nazi (Weimar) Berlin. With no scripted dialogue Billy Wilder was apparently responsible for the screenplay (I strongly suspect the editing,too, though IMDb doesn't indicate who did that). The soundtrack is evocative and mood-setting but I listen with my favorite jazz. You could get away with it in 1930. :)

 

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I took a look at the Criterion Channel (I already subscribe to it but don't watch it every week)...I was glad to see the Paramount western DENVER AND RIO GRANDE (1952) included as part of Sterling Hayden's spotlight. Plus the Republic western JOHNNY GUITAR (1954) was thrown in for good measure!

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Downhill Racer (1969, Donald Ritchie)

You can find the DeWeese article online but the film is currently streaming on The Criterion Channel, one of my favorite films about the personal lives of professional athletes. It's one of Robert Redford's best (imo) and the ski footage is masterfully edited. The four extra features which accompany the film are interesting, including fine doc on Ritchie.

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION ON THE MOVIES TV NETWORK -

All I needed was to see the first day of February on their schedule to know that The Movies Network is on point.  Their full schedule is not available, but you can see the February schedule one day at a time. Today, I saw February 1, 2022 - The following movies are scheduled: Bright Road, with Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte,  The Blackboard Jungle with Sidney Poitier, followed by Edge of the City, with Poitier, Ruby Dee, and John Cassavettes.

Looking forward to the rest of February on the Movies TV Network

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Interview With The Vampire (1994, Neil Jordan)

A vampire tells his epic life story: love, betrayal, loneliness, and hunger. To me it's one of the most terrifying, campy and dark variations on a vampire theme with a screenplay by Ann Rice.  It's currently streaming on Netflix. The late Larry King interviewed Rice back in '94 for the film's release:

 

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There Will Be Blood (2007, Paul Thomas Anderson)

A story of family, religion, hatred, oil and madness, focusing on a turn-of-the-century prospector in the early days of the business. YouTube premier this month. Also on Netflix. Anderson's films are certainly set in a wide range of enviornments. My favorite is his feature debut, Hard Eight. But this one, which features Oscar winners, Day-Lewis and cinematographer, Robert Elswit, is pretty good, too (soundtrack is oddly conspicuous.) 

 

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8 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Thursday January 6, 2022

Screen Shot 2020-02-06 at 5.59.11 PM.jpeg

Headlines on TCM

rope

 

It's been a while since I've seen ROPE. Looking forward to watching it again!

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High Noon (1952, Fred Zinnemann)

A lawman stands alone to defend a town of cowardly citizens against a gang of revenge-seeking criminals. Great looking copy on YouTube. 

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