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TCM and Other Sources for Classic Film


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The Planet of the Apes Franchise on YouTube

I spotted the first three installments (anyway) streaming free on the channel. Looks like they're repeating what they did with the Godzilla movies. Love it. Will definitely watch them in order. Glad I kept my Premium subscription (no ads, though my roomate swears an adblocker does the trick - I doubt it).

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8 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Ando,

Are you going to tell us what has been added on the Criterion Channel this month?

🙂 I'm hoping Eucalyptus P. Milstone will take the lead. He did a great job last month. If we don't get an entry from him I'd be glad to do a quick run-down.

 

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Fail Safe (1958, Sidney Lumet)

A technical malfunction sends American planes to Moscow to deliver a nuclear attack precipitating a potential all-out war. People, unfairly, compare this film to Kubrick's film, Dr. Strangelove, but Lumet strikes a different tone altogether. Strangelove never feels like there's anything but greater hijinks at risk and never really rises above lampoon (imo), though the ultimate message of men being cavalier with the fate of the human race is, admittedly, similar. Lumet's film, on the other hand, is deadly serious and even induces a bit of sweat. Makes you appreciate Strangelove all the more. Recommended. Free on Plex. 

 

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Thursday February 3, 2022

screen

Brod on TCM

born yesterday

big house u.s.a.

down three dark streets

convicted

Had to do a double take. For some reason Brod didn't equate to Broderick Crawford in my mind, TB. :) He's one of the more unsung of the old Hollywood players. My favorite performance from him is in Robert Rossen's 1949 film, All The Kings Men. Ok, admittedly, the fiesty Mercedes McCambridge is the other great draw but the film is a classic and, of course, was remade in 2006 with Sean Penn in the lead. The Rossen film is currently streaming free on Plex.

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FEBRUARY 2022 HIGHLIGHTS

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Featuring a new introduction by Criterion curatorial director Ashley Clark

A perfect storm of rhythm, bass, melody, and political and spiritual messaging, reggae was born in Jamaica in the late 1960s and early ’70s, and has since gone on to become one of the most influential, popular, and genre-exploding forms of music around the globe. The first classic reggae film, Perry Henzell’s wildly entertaining drama The Harder They Come, starring the great Jimmy Cliff as singer-outlaw Ivanhoe Martin, thrummed with hard-edged authenticity and set a template for future classics like Rockers and the recently rediscovered Babylon, whose casts of real-life reggae stars and industry figures lend a sense of raw reportage to fictional narratives. Unsurprisingly, many documentarians have also turned their gaze on reggae’s key trailblazers (The Upsetter: The Life and Music of Lee Scratch Perry, The Story of Lovers Rock), amplifying the movement’s resounding cinematic legacy.

  • The Harder They Come, Perry Henzell, 1972
  • Blacks Britannica, David Koff, 1978
  • Rockers, Theodoros Bafaloukos, 1978
  • Babylon, Franco Rosso, 1980
  • Omega Rising Women of Rastafari, D. Elmina Davis, 1988
  • A Reggae Session, Stephanie Bennett and Thomas Adelman, 1988
  • We the Ragamuffin, Julian Henriques, 1992
  • Babymother, Julian Henriques, 1998
  • No Place Like Home, Perry Henzell, 2006
  • The Upsetter: The Life and Music of Lee Scratch Perry, Ethan Higbee and Adam Bhala Lough, 2008
  • The Story of Lovers Rock, Menelik Shabazz, 2011

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For trailblazing singer and screen star Harry Belafonte, acting and activism were always closely intertwined. Rising to prominence in the 1950s, the Jamaican American Belafonte became the first singer to sell over a million records with his chart-topping album Calypso, which introduced the Caribbean musical style to listeners around the world. Inspired by his mentor Paul Robeson, Belafonte used his celebrity to take on roles that challenged racial prejudices and taboos in films like the hard-hitting noir Odds Against Tomorrow and the apocalyptic science-fiction drama The World, the Flesh and the Devil, both of which he coproduced. Projecting an easygoing charisma and passionate intensity in front of the camera and making key contributions behind it (the hip-hop drama Beat Street, which he produced and composed the music for but did not appear in, is also included here), Belafonte was instrumental in transforming the depiction of Black Americans on-screen and remains a fiercely outspoken advocate for progressive political and social change.

  • Bright Road, Gerald Mayer, 1953
  • Odds Against Tomorrow, Robert Wise, 1959
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil, Ranald MacDougall, 1959
  • The Angel Levine, Ján Kadár, 1970
  • Uptown Saturday Night, Sidney Poitier, 1974
  • Beat Street, Stan Lathan, 1984
  • Kansas City, Robert Altman, 1996

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Featuring hours of supplemental features from Criterion’s Blu-ray box set, as well as a new introduction to Watermelon Man by film scholar Racquel J. Gates

Director, writer, composer, actor, and one-man creative revolutionary Melvin Van Peebles jolted American independent cinema to new life with his explosive stylistic energy and unfiltered expression of Black consciousness. Though he undeniably altered the course of film history with the anarchic Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, that pop-culture bombshell is just one piece of a remarkably varied career that also encompassed forays into European art cinema (The Story of a Three Day Pass), mainstream Hollywood comedy (Watermelon Man), and Broadway musicals (Don’t Play Us Cheap). Each facet of Van Peebles’s renegade genius is on display in this tribute to a transformative artist whose caustic social observation, radical formal innovation, and uncompromising vision established a new cinematic model for Black creative independence.

  • The Story of a Three Day Pass, 1967
  • Watermelon Man, 1970
  • Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, 1971
  • Don’t Play Us Cheap, 1972

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While melodrama had been a cinematic staple since the dawn of film history, it took Douglas Sirk, working in luridly expressionistic Technicolor, to realize the full emotional and aesthetic possibilities of the form. Throughout the 1950s, the German-born Sirk helmed a string of deliriously stylized soap operas that turned the genre’s artifice against itself, using its lavish mise-en-scène, wildly improbable plotting, and histrionic excess to create scorching critiques of suburban conformism, traditional family values, and American class and racial attitudes. These films—including the operatically perverse Written on the Wind and the stingingly subversive Imitation of Life—stand as some of the most heartbreaking, outrageous, and visually complex ever made within the Hollywood studio system.

  • Magnificent Obsession, 1954
  • All That Heaven Allows, 1955
  • Written on the Wind, 1956
  • Imitation of Life, 1959

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For over three decades, native New Yorker Stanley Nelson has been committed to crafting empathetic, thoughtful, and deeply researched documentaries that illuminate a variety of African American experiences. A MacArthur “Genius” Fellow and multiple Emmy Award winner, whose latest film, Attica, is shortlisted for an Academy Award, the prolific Nelson is as capable of creating warm, intimate personal portraits (A Place of Our Own, about the forty years he spent summering at Oak Bluffs, a Black-oriented resort community on Martha’s Vineyard) as he is of spinning thrilling, expansive tales of unfairly overlooked Black contributions to cultural life (The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords, Tell Them We Are Rising), and pulsating studies of Black activism in action (Freedom Summer, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution)

  • The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords, 1999
  • A Place of Our Own, 2004
  • Freedom Summer, 2014
  • The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, 2015
  • Tell Them We Are Rising, 2017

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From earning an Academy Award nomination for his very first screen role in The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming to his Oscar win forty years later for Little Miss Sunshine, Alan Arkin has enjoyed an eclectic and distinguished career as both an actor and director. A lifelong cinephile who grew up watching international masterpieces at New York’s legendary Thalia theater, he sits down with his son and fellow actor, Adam Arkin, to discuss his passionate opinions on movies, sharing what he learned about acting from the great French film stars and singling out the director he would have given anything to work with. As something of a specialist in black comedy, the films Arkin has selected unsurprisingly include several superlative examples of the genre, including a devastatingly funny Italian gem (Mafioso), a wild counterculture parable (Greaser’s Palace), and an absurdist art-world satire (The Square).

  • Lost Horizon, Frank Capra, 1937
  • Of Mice and Men, Lewis Milestone, 1939
  • The Wages of Fear, Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1953
  • The Horse’s Mouth, Ronald Neame, 1958
  • Mafioso, Alberto Lattuada, 1962
  • Greaser’s Palace, Robert Downey Sr., 1972
  • Running on Empty, Sidney Lumet, 1988
  • The Square, Ruben Östlund, 2017

COMPLETE LIST OF FILMS PREMIERING ON THE CRITERION CHANNEL THIS MONTH:

  • Alan & Naomi, Sterling Van Wagenen, 1992
  • All That Heaven Allows, Douglas Sirk, 1955
  • The Angel Levine, Ján Kadár, 1970
  • Babylon, Franco Rosso, 1980
  • Babymother, Julian Henriques, 1998
  • Bamako, Abderrahmane Sissako, 2006
  • Beat Street, Stan Lathan, 1984
  • Blacks Britannica, David Koff, 1978
  • The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, Stanley Nelson, 2015
  • The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords, Stanley Nelson, 1999
  • Bright Road, Gerald Mayer, 1953
  • Cake Walk, Ulysses Jenkins, 1983
  • Chez Jolie Coiffure, Rosine Mbakam, 2018
  • Citizen Ruth, Alexander Payne, 1996 **
  • Company Line, Kevin Jerome Everson, 2009
  • Death on the Nile, John Guillermin, 1978
  • Delphine’s Prayers, Rosine Mbakam, 2021
  • A Different Image, Alile Sharon Larkin, 1982
  • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, Luis Buñuel, 1972
  • Don’t Play Us Cheap, Melvin Van Peebles, 1972
  • Dream City, Ulysses Jenkins, 1983
  • Ears, Nose and Throat, Kevin Jerome Everson, 2016
  • Erie, Kevin Jerome Everson, 2010
  • Far from Heaven, Todd Haynes, 2002
  • Feathers, A. V. Rockwell, 2018
  • Floyd Norman: An Animated Life, Michael Fiore and Erik Sharkey, 2016
  • Freedom Summer, Stanley Nelson, 2014
  • Glenville, Kevin Jerome Everson and Kahlil Pedizisai, 2020
  • The Harder They Come, Perry Henzell, 1972
  • The Heartland, Marquise Mays, 2021
  • Hive, Blerta Basholli, 2021
  • How to Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It), Joe Angio, 2005
  • IFO, Kevin Jerome Everson, 2017
  • Imitation of Life, Douglas Sirk, 1959
  • Inconsequential Doggereal, Ulysses Jenkins, 1981
  • Kansas City, Robert Altman, 1996 **
  • The Learning Tree, Gordon Parks, 1969
  • Les cinq cent balles, Melvin Van Peebles, 1963
  • Lost Horizon, Frank Capra, 1937
  • Love Meetings, Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1964
  • Magnificent Obsession, Douglas Sirk, 1954
  • Mass of Images, Ulysses Jenkins, 1978
  • The Metamorphosis of Birds, Catarina Vasconcelos, 2020
  • Mississippi Mermaid, François Truffaut, 1969
  • The Movement of Things, Manuela Serra, 1985
  • Mutual Native Duplex, Ulysses Jenkins, 1990
  • Native Son, Pierre Chenal, 1951
  • The Nomadics, Ulysses Jenkins, 1991
  • No Place Like Home, Perry Henzell, 2006
  • Notions of Freedom, Ulysses Jenkins, 2007
  • Odds Against Tomorrow, Robert Wise, 1959
  • Omega Rising Women of Rastafari, D. Elmina Davis, 1988
  • Personal Best, Robert Towne, 1982
  • Pier Kids, Elegance Bratton, 2019
  • A Place of Our Own, Stanley Nelson, 2004
  • Planet X, Ulysses Jenkins, 2006
  • Rambling Rose, Martha Coolidge, 1991
  • A Reggae Session, Stephanie Bennett and Thomas Adelman, 1988
  • Remnants of the Watts Festival, Ulysses Jenkins, 1980
  • Rockers, Theodoros Bafaloukos, 1978
  • Running on Empty, Sidney Lumet, 1988
  • Self Divination, Ulysses Jenkins, 1989
  • Shaft, Gordon Parks, 1971
  • Sound That, Kevin Jerome Everson, 2014
  • The Square, Ruben Östlund, 2017 **
  • The Story of a Three Day Pass, Melvin Van Peebles, 1967
  • Sun Children, Majid Majidi, 2020
  • Sunlight, Melvin Van Peebles, 1957
  • Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, Melvin Van Peebles, 1971
  • Tell Them We Are Rising, Stanley Nelson and Marco Williams, 2017
  • Three Pickup Men for Herrick, Melvin van Peebles, 1957
  • The Two Faces of a Bamiléké Woman, Rosine Mbakam, 2018
  • Two-Zone Transfer, Ulysses Jenkins, 1979
  • The Upsetter: The Life and Music of Lee Scratch Perry, Ethan Higbee and Adam Bhala Lough, 2008
  • Uptown Saturday Night, Sidney Poitier, 1974
  • Watermelon Man, Melvin Van Peebles, 1970
  • We the Ragamuffin, Julian Henriques, 1992
  • Without Your Interpretation, Ulysses Jenkins, 1983
  • The World, the Flesh and the Devil, Ranald MacDougall, 1959
  • Written on the Wind, Douglas Sirk, 1956
  • Zebrahead, Anthony Drazan, 1992
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2 hours ago, ando said:

Had to do a double take. For some reason Brod didn't equate to Broderick Crawford in my mind, TB.

He didn't go by the name Broderick. Everyone called him Brod.

Love all those great Columbia films he made after he earned the Oscar-- BORN YESTERDAY, CARGO TO CAPETOWN, THE MOB, SCANDAL SHEET, THE LAST POSSE and my favorite LAST OF THE COMANCHES.

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The Fugitive Kind (1960, Sidney Lumet)

Drifter, Valentine "Snakeskin" Xavier, wanders into a sleepy Southern town and gets embroiled in a love triangle with an unhappy wife and a town outcast. This one is based on the Tennessee Williams play, Orpheus Descending. It's a poetic, slow burner about hate among tragic characters looking for redemption where they can find it. The tone of the film is a bit off-kilter but Marlon Brando, Anna Magnani and Joanne Woodward make it memorable. Free on tubi.

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Hair (1979, Milos Forman)

Why people continue to crap on this film because it isn't what happened a decade earlier irritates me. The score, the fabulous singing, the threadbare plot, the explosive choreography and general subject matter are all based on the 60s live phenomena that was the HAIR musical. It's a paean to that historical event and era but is very much its own animal - and a classic at that. Whoever said a film had to have even a tangental relation to its original source? Shakespeare sure didn't. Foreman put together a fantastic production to provide a glimpse for generations who were not around when the 60s erupted and to reveal issues that every American generation has had to contend with since then. The styles may have changed. Almost nothing else has.  Free on tubi.  BTW, tubi rocks. 

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On 2/4/2022 at 10:20 AM, TopBilled said:

Friday February 4, 2022

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Teachers on TCM

to sir with love

stand and deliver

more teachers...

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The Karate Kid (1984, John G. Avildsen)

A martial arts master agrees to teach karate to a bullied teenager. Oscar nod for Pat Morita as karate master, Mr. Miyaki. Free on the Peacock Channel.

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Saturday February 5, 2022

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Dietrich on TCM

rancho notorious

more Dietrich

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Witness For The Prosecution (1957, Billy Wilder)

A veteran British barrister must defend his client in a murder trial that has surprise after surprise. 6 Oscar nods, including Best Picture. Free on tubi. Great copy.

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Bryce Bennett, Ryan Cochran-Siegle and Travis Ganong of the United States will compete for the Alpine Skiing competition's first medal of the 2022 Winter Olympic Games in the men’s downhill event, live on NBC tonight starting at 10 p.m. In honor I'm rewatching the 1969 Robert Redford paean to the sport -

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Downhill Racer (Michael Ritchie) on The Criterion Channel

One of my favorites from Redford. Good performances and, of course, excellent coverage of Alpine crashing. 

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8 hours ago, ando said:

ryan-cochran-siegle.jpg

Bryce Bennett, Ryan Cochran-Siegle and Travis Ganong of the United States will compete for the Alpine Skiing competition's first medal of the 2022 Winter Olympic Games in the men’s downhill event, live on NBC tonight starting at 10 p.m. In honor I'm rewatching the 1969 Robert Redford paean to the sport -

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Downhill Racer (Michael Ritchie) on The Criterion Channel

One of my favorites from Redford. Good performances and, of course, excellent coverage of Alpine crashing. 

more snow...

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Dekalog I (1988, Krzysztof Kieślowski)

Kieślowski's first installment of the famous 10 part extended film set that centers around each of the biblical Ten Commandments. Dekalog I, which is a meditation on the commandment, I AM THE LORD THY GOD; THOU SHALT HAVE NO OTHER GOD BUT ME, involves a semantics professor and computer hobbyist, raising his young son to look to science for answers while his aunt lives a life rooted in faith. Set deep in the heart of a frozen Warsaw this first entry in the series is one of the most unforgettable films I've seen. Streaming on easterneuropeanmovies.com. The Criterion Channel needs to get the rights to this classic. It's one of the best on the label. The co-writer on DekalogKrzysztof Piesiewicz, talks about the project, beginning with the challenge of the first film:

 

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Henry V (1989, Kenneth Branagh)

The best way to see Branagh's version of The Bard's history, of course, would be on the largest screen (preferable IMAX, though extant prints may not make this possible) that your local cinema has to offer. That's how I initially saw it. Branagh conjured a splendid bit of magic. Free on tubi.

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