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TCM and Other Sources for Classic Film


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Seriously doubt this.  His movies are of one limited genre for one thing.  More importantly, he is continuously interrupting for inane commentary and long commercials.  Movies on TCM are never interrupted.  You may have to listen to silly comments at introduction and end (mute button works well here), but can watch the movies without interruption.

I have tried to watch Svengoolie and quit after the third long commercial break in about 20 minutes.  Even muting doesn't help.  Tried recording and fast forwarding and that didn't work either.

BTW, I watch MeTV for the old tv shows-and watch it frequently, even though I have cable with all the premium channels.

Regardless,this thread is getting really silly.  MeTV almost exclusively shows old tv shows, NOT movies.  TCM shows old movies and NO tv shows.

this network and gettv are much more of a competition to TCM than MeTV will ever be.

you mention svengoolie's inane commentary and long commercials. actually a lot of his interjections are quite informative about a film's background. and svengoolie doesn't try to come across like some cinema academic just a regular guy. :D

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you mention svengoolie's inane commentary and long commercials. actually a lot of his interjections are quite informative about a film's background. and svengoolie doesn't try to come across like some cinema academic just a regular guy. :D

I consider myself really fortunate that I don't know any "regular" guys like that! Actually, Nipkow, I think you've insulted generations of "regular" guys!

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I consider myself really fortunate that I don't know any "regular" guys like that! Actually, Nipkow, I think you've insulted generations of "regular" guys!

So why is it not okay to insult the average joes, but okay to insult Svengoolie...? Insert head-scratching and double take expression here.

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My mistake, less than 5% (if that) of TCM's programming is old TV shows.

BUT they are related directly to Classic Movies.  Johnny Carson is about classic movie personalities and the Screen Directors Playhouse is TV shows by Movie Screen Directors

Regardless, MeTV is NOT a threat to TCM and is not cutting in on TCM's audience.

I have got to quit reading this thread!!!!!

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So why is it not okay to insult the average joes, but okay to insult Svengoolie...? Insert head-scratching and double take expression here.

I think it's ok to criticize (which is different from insulting) the quality of individual arts presenters, actors, directors, etc. That's part of what we're here for.  My feeling about Svengoolie is akin to something Dorothy Parker once said about someone: "Tonstant Weader Fwowed Up."

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I think it's ok to criticize (which is different from insulting) the quality of individual arts presenters, actors, directors, etc. That's part of what we're here for.  My feeling about Svengoolie is akin to something Dorothy Parker once said about someone: "Tonstant Weader Fwowed Up."

I think it's ok to criticize (which is different from insulting) the quality of individual arts presenters, actors, directors, etc.

 

Now that's interesting. So it IS OK! Guess I have to learn how to criticize. :D :D :D

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I think it's ok to criticize (which is different from insulting) the quality of individual arts presenters, actors, directors, etc.

 

Now that's interesting. So it IS OK! Guess I have to learn how to criticize. :D :D :D

Of course, insult is often in the eye/mind of the recipient, and some people are SO sensitive!  Are you one of those delicate creatures? I guess we have to be careful. I once said something unkind about Barbara Stanwyck on this board, and another poster took it so personally that she was off the boards for days. I later heard from another poster that the poster in question even considered never coming back, she was that sensitive.  So I learned, be careful about how you BS about BS!

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My mistake, less than 5% (if that) of TCM's programming is old TV shows.

BUT they are related directly to Classic Movies.  

The Joan Crawford telefilm DELLA was a failed pilot that did not sell. It wasn't even considered good enough for network television in the 60s, yet here it turned up on TCM all these years later. I would call it filler. 

 

TCM also showed an episode Crawford did of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. that was combined with another episode and renamed THE KARATE KILLERS. The episode has a 3.3 rating (very low) on the internet movie database, and the film made by combining the two episodes has a 4.5 rating. Hardly a classic movie.

 

When Eleanor Parker was Star of the Month, TCM showed a two-part episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. featuring Parker that was renamed HOW TO STEAL THE WORLD. Not a classic movie either.  So yeah, TCM has been airing classic television like ME-TV.

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Of course, insult is often in the eye/mind of the recipient, and some people are SO sensitive!  Are you one of those delicate creatures? I guess we have to be careful. I once said something unkind about Barbara Stanwyck on this board, and another poster took it so personally that she was off the boards for days. I later heard from another poster that the poster in question even considered never coming back, she was that sensitive.  So I learned, be careful about how you BS about BS!

Are you one of those delicate creatures?

 

MEEEEEEE????????????? :D:D:D

 

Oh, man, thank you for the laugh, Swithin. I'm as sensitive as the hide of the poor remaining white rhino, which man in his greed will kill off very soon.

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I think it's ok to criticize (which is different from insulting) the quality of individual arts presenters, actors, directors, etc.

 

Yep, it's a long-held tradition to throw tomatoes at show-biz people who fail to please us.

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Yep, it's a long-held tradition to throw tomatoes at show-biz people who fail to please us.

Goes back to the days of the Commedia dell'Arte -- perhaps earlier. 

 

But you know DB, you all may be right about this political correctness in hindsight thing.  One of my favorite movies is The Best Years of Our Lives. How can I love a film where the man is the soldier and the woman is the housewife? That is SO politically incorrect of me! And I love A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  How can I love a film in which the NYC cop is Irish? Hateful stereotypes! I'm ashamed of myself.

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Goes back to the days of the Commedia dell'Arte -- perhaps earlier. 

 

But you know DB, you all may be right about this political correctness in hindsight thing.  One of my favorite movies is The Best Years of Our Lives. How can I love a film where the man is the soldier and the woman is the housewife? That is SO politically incorrect of me! And I love A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  How can I love a film in which the NYC cop is Irish? Hateful stereotypes! I'm ashamed of myself.

 

Excuse me here Swithin, but I THINK the more "politically incorrect" thing in that there "Tree in Brooklyn" story MIGHT be that the father is a DRUNKEN IRISHMAN, and NOT so much that the COP'S lineage ALSO stems from the Emerald Isle!

 

(...uh huh...now THERE's ya a "stereotype", dude!!!) LOL 

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Excuse me here Swithin, but I THINK the more "politically incorrect" thing in that there "Tree in Brooklyn" story MIGHT be that the father is a DRUNKEN IRISHMAN, and NOT so much that the COP'S lineage ALSO stems from the Emerald Isle!

 

(...uh huh...now THERE's ya a "stereotype", dude!!!) LOL 

They are both stereotypes, but even in movies about drunks who aren't Irish, the cops are Irish. And even in movies set in NYC that aren't about drunks at all, the cops are Irish. Remember Dargo that stereotypes are not only negative -- they can be positive, but if stereotypes are wrong, they're always wrong!

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So is "All blacks are athletic", but the utterance of such a stereotype is seen as objectionable, and thus has negative connotations.

 

And speakin' o' "Jewish stereotypes"...

 

Let's remember here that Hank Greenberg AND Sandy Koufax disprove the "stereotype" that "Jews aren't very good at athletics"!!! Though then again, I suppose only two examples can only be used as "anecdotal evidence" here, huh. ;)

 

LOL

 

(...JUS' kiddin', JUS' kiddin' here, and goin' for the old joke here, THAT'S all...I know there were and are many more than just those two)

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They are both stereotypes, but even in movies about drunks who aren't Irish, the cops are Irish. And even in movies set in NYC that aren't about drunks at all, the cops are Irish. Remember Dargo that stereotypes are not only negative -- they can be positive, but if stereotypes are wrong, they're always wrong!

 

And in all seriousness here Swithin...sorry, but I'm not quite gettin' this comment of yours here.

 

You see, just because the Irish would go from being the "outcasts" in their new land(NYC, in particular) during the early to mid 19th Century and then soon "assimilate" into their new environment to become "trusted members" of American society for it to become a "cliche" of the "Irish Cop" by the early 20th Century, how exactly does it follow that this "positive stereotype" became "wrong" again???

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They are both stereotypes, but even in movies about drunks who aren't Irish, the cops are Irish. And even in movies set in NYC that aren't about drunks at all, the cops are Irish. Remember Dargo that stereotypes are not only negative -- they can be positive, but if stereotypes are wrong, they're always wrong!

 

In movies stereotypes are necessary plot devices.   Most movies are only a few hours long and one has to convey a lot in a very short timeframe.   So all roles lack depth and utilize stereotypes;   e.g. the mom,  the butler,   the punk,  the gangster,   the lawyer,  doctor,   working class man,  etc....

 

A movie stereotype is 'right' by definition if it conveys the character to the audience.   

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And in all seriousness here Swithin...sorry, but I'm not quite gettin' this comment of yours here.

 

You see, just because the Irish would go from being the "outcasts" in their new land(NYC, in particular) during the early to mid 19th Century and then soon "assimilate" into their new environment to become "trusted members" of American society for it to become a "cliche" of the "Irish Cop" by the early 20th Century, how exactly does it follow that this "positive stereotype" became "wrong" again???

Here's one of the definitions of stereotype: "a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing." It doesn't have to be positive or negative. A bigger issue is not the endlessly repeated arguments that take place here about stereotypes in movies, but the concept of stereotypes. NYC police men were predominantly Irish, at a point in the City's history, so there is a certain historic accuracy to cops on movies being depicted as Irish, as perhaps there is in depicting people in other jobs according to perhaps the ethnicities of people who held those jobs.  It may be the viewers prejudice that views a certain kind of job as inferior. I do agree with James' point about plot devices. 

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Here's one of the definitions of stereotype: "a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing." It doesn't have to be positive or negative. A bigger issue is not the endlessly repeated arguments that take place here about stereotypes in movies, but the concept of stereotypes. NYC police men were predominantly Irish, at a point in the City's history, so there is a certain historic accuracy to cops on movies being depicted as Irish, as perhaps there is in depicting people in other jobs according to perhaps the ethnicities of people who held those jobs.  It may be the viewers prejudice that views a certain kind of job as inferior. I do agree with James' point about plot devices. 

 

Here is my stereotype story;  When I was 25 or so I went to a business meeting in the NorthEast (first time I was there since I was in middle management).  I really looked young and the rest of the guys all where 'older' as far as their looks.  We were all wearing suits and I didn't really fit in.    At the formal dinner all the hired help were black.     I did notice this and felt 'well times really haven't changed'.     Than this black waiter comes to me and makes a joke that I didn't really belong there since I was too young and my suit didn't really fit.    I was offended and felt like saying 'well you clearly belong in the place you're at!'.     I didn't but it just goes to show that stereotypes are used by everyone.

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Here is my stereotype story;  When I was 25 or so I went to a business meeting in the NorthEast (first time I was there since I was in middle management).  I really looked young and the rest of the guys all where 'older' as far as their looks.  We were all wearing suits and I didn't really fit in.    At the formal dinner all the hired help were black.     I did notice this and felt 'well times really haven't changed'.     Than this black waiter comes to me and makes a joke that I didn't really belong there since I was too young and my suit didn't really fit.    I was offended and felt like saying 'well you clearly belong in the place you're at!'.     I didn't but it just goes to show that stereotypes are used by everyone.

True. Sometimes stereotypes are joined with prejudices, sometimes not. I've had rheumatoid arthritis since I was a kid. When I was a teenager, it was particularly bad. I never wanted to use a cane. But I did often need to sit. I was sitting in one of the front seats on an NYC bus one day. An old woman got on the bus, looked at me, and said "I want that seat!" Normally, even in my condition, I would still get up for an old person, but I really resented her tone and that she assumed because I was young, I was healthy and should get up. She seemed to me to be healthy as a horse, despite her age, so I just said, "Sorry, I have arthritis." She shouted to the whole bus, "It's ok, he's arthritic!" (Or words to that effect).  I looked the stereotype of a healthy teen. Her prejudice was that I was therefore healthy and should give up my seat to her.  She claimed no physical infirmity, apart from the rights of her age.  I was going to say, "Leave me alone you old bag!," but I was a bit more civil than she was.

 

Which reminds me -- There was a lot of fuss (as perhaps there should be) about "Saturday Night Live" not having a woman of color on the show. So they were shamed into hiring one. But who speaks for the elderly? Why is no one in the regular cast much over 35? No one seems to care.

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