Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

TCM and Other Sources for Classic Film


Recommended Posts

Here is my stereotype story;  When I was 25 or so I went to a business meeting in the NorthEast (first time I was there since I was in middle management).  I really looked young and the rest of the guys all where 'older' as far as their looks.  We were all wearing suits and I didn't really fit in.    At the formal dinner all the hired help were black.     I did notice this and felt 'well times really haven't changed'.     Than this black waiter comes to me and makes a joke that I didn't really belong there since I was too young and my suit didn't really fit.    I was offended and felt like saying 'well you clearly belong in the place you're at!'.     I didn't but it just goes to show that stereotypes are used by everyone.

The fact that your suit didn't fit doesn't "fit in" with the rest of your story Why didn't it fit?

Link to post
Share on other sites

And speakin' o' "Jewish stereotypes"...

 

Let's remember here that Hank Greenberg AND Sandy Koufax disprove the "stereotype" that "Jews aren't very good at athletics"!!! Though then again, I suppose only two examples can only be used as "anecdotal evidence" here, huh. ;)

 

LOL

 

(...JUS' kiddin', JUS' kiddin' here, and goin' for the old joke here, THAT'S all...I know there were and are many more than just those two)

When you consider that the third best Jewish baseball player EVER was probably Al Rosen, who many have never heard of, that seems to say something.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my stereotype story...

I think we all have a stereotype story. One of my housekeepers was Mexican. I felt very close to her. I remember when I watched the 1959 version of IMITATION OF LIFE-- you know, the part where Lana Turner cries at the end when Juanita Moore dies, it really teared me up. You do become close to someone like that. My second housekeeper was from Australia. Ironically, the Mexican woman who worked for me was a legal citizen-- but the white woman (the Aussie) was illegal. So that in itself shows that the stereotype is not always true.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we all have a stereotype story. One of my housekeepers was Mexican. I felt very close to her. I remember when I watched the 1959 version of IMITATION OF LIFE-- you know, the part where Lana Turner cries at the end when Juanita Moore dies, it really teared me up. You do become close to someone like that. My second housekeeper was from Australia. Ironically, the Mexican woman who worked for me was a legal citizen-- but the white woman (the Aussie) was illegal. So that in itself shows that the stereotype is not always true.

TopBilled, you've just destroyed my stereotype of the TCM message board poster as someone who doesn't have housekeepers!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

TopBilled, you've just destroyed my stereotype of the TCM message board poster as someone who doesn't have housekeepers!

Not true, I've had a manservant my entire adult life. I don't know what I'd do without one. My current one is a dead ringer for Halliwell Hobbes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we all have a stereotype story. One of my housekeepers was Mexican. I felt very close to her. I remember when I watched the 1959 version of IMITATION OF LIFE-- you know, the part where Lana Turner cries at the end when Juanita Moore dies, it really teared me up. You do become close to someone like that. My second housekeeper was from Australia. Ironically, the Mexican woman who worked for me was a legal citizen-- but the white woman (the Aussie) was illegal. So that in itself shows that the stereotype is not always true.

ONE of your housekeepers?

 

ONE?

 

I'm in awe.

 

No, seriously. In a-w-e awe.

 

I'll leave it to someone else to ask the total number of housekeepers you had. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

ONE of your housekeepers?

 

ONE?

 

I'm in awe.

 

No, seriously. In a-w-e awe.

 

I'll leave it to someone else to ask the total number of housekeepers you had. :)

One at a time. As in the first one retired...I went without for awhile, then hired the other one. The Australian gal is married to a Mexican American (and she's still in the process of getting her immigration papers pushed through). Her husband was born and raised in Arizona. When they cross the border into California-- like when they go to San Diego-- we have checkpoints at all the borders-- and as long as she doesn't open her mouth to speak (betraying her Australian accent), they never suspect her of being illegal. But her husband gets stopped and questioned all the time. And incidentally, the border patrol agents are not all white-- some of them are Mexican Americans themselves. This is the state of the world today, folks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

One at a time. As in the first one retired...I went without for awhile, then hired the other one. The Australian gal is married to a Mexican American (and she's still in the process of getting her immigration papers pushed through). Her husband was born and raised in Arizona. When they cross the border into California-- like when they go to San Diego-- we have checkpoints at all the borders-- and as long as she doesn't open her mouth to speak (betraying her Australian accent), they never suspect her of being illegal. But her husband gets stopped and questioned all the time. And incidentally, the border patrol agents are not all white-- some of them are Mexican Americans themselves. This is the state of the world today, folks!

 

Maybe when lots more "white" people begin to travel to Mexico before entering the U.S., she'll fall under greater scrutiny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe when lots more "white" people begin to travel to Mexico before entering the U.S., she'll fall under greater scrutiny.

A lot of "white" Canadians go to Mexico for their meds-- these are the snowbirds who live in southern Arizona during the winter months. So there is a lot of back-and-forth traffic of all races and nationalities. One of the reasons I wanted to come up to Wisconsin for awhile is because I feel that Arizona is becoming too militaristic. Within a 50 mile radius, we had three branches of military plus all the border patrol personnel (many of them plus local law enforcement are ex-military). I am sure that where Dargo is located in the northern part of the state, it's not like it is in the southern part. I am still undecided about whether I will go back. I ended up renewing my lease on the place I took here so I could have more time to decide. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of "white" Canadians go to Mexico for their meds-- these are the snowbirds who live in southern Arizona during the winter months. So there is a lot of back-and-forth traffic of all races and nationalities. One of the reasons I wanted to come up to Wisconsin for awhile is because I feel that Arizona is becoming too militaristic. Within a 50 mile radius, we had three branches of military plus all the border patrol personnel. I am sure that where Dargo is located in the northern part of the state, it's not like it is in the southern part. I am still undecided about whether I will go back. I ended up renewing my lease on the place I took here so I could have more time to decide. 

 

But aren't they already U.S. residents? Just wait till more Australians and Swedes and Nords and Russians and Finns and Brits and all the other Caucasians from around the world start travelling to Mexico before entering the U.S.

 

Then we'll see whether "white" people start getting questioned a little more diligently.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But aren't they already U.S. residents? Just wait till more Australians and Swedes and Nords and Russians and Finns and Brits and all the other Caucasians from around the world start travelling to Mexico before entering the U.S. - then maybe she'll fall under more scrutiny.

That's a possibility. The Canadians-- many from Saskatchewan and British Columbia-- are obviously not U.S. residents, though some of them have time share condos in southern Arizona-- but I think they cannot exceed a certain number of months in the U.S. or the Canadian healthcare system drops them. So they usually go to Canada for Christmas then come back in January. Then leave again at Easter. That's a whole other story.

 

In Alexandra's case, she came over to spend time with her fiance (whom she met online); they rushed into marriage and she stayed. Now she is trying to become a legalized citizen. If she is questioned at any one of these checkpoints and she is found to be illegal, then she will likely be sent back to Australia until her immigration status is resolved.

 

By the way, in Mexican neighborhoods down in southern Arizona, border patrol agents do routine sweeps/raids where they suspect illegals to be staying. Her mother-in-law's home was 'inspected' a few years ago, because they were renting a room to some day laborers. Like I said, I don't think Sedona (where Dargo lives) has those kinds of things happening.

Link to post
Share on other sites

But aren't they already U.S. residents? Just wait till more Australians and Swedes and Nords and Russians and Finns and Brits and all the other Caucasians from around the world start travelling to Mexico before entering the U.S.

 

Then we'll see whether "white" people start getting questioned a little more diligently.

Isn't there a movie about that?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hold_Back_the_Dawn

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Snowbirds", as they're often referred to, are part-time residents of the U.S. While there, it's easy to understand that they would cross the nearest international border to obtain meds at a reasonable cost. But trust me, when they're in Canada, there's no way they'd dream of driving all the way to Mexico for their meds.

 

If the U.S. didn't allow such price gouging, none of this would be happening. They'd only live in the U.S. for the warm weather part of the year, which is why they are part-time residents to begin with.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Snowbirds", as they're often referred to, are part-time residents of the U.S. While there, it's easy to understand that they would cross the nearest international border to obtain meds at a reasonable cost. But trust me, when they're in Canada, there's no way they'd dream of driving all the way to Mexico for their meds.

 

If the U.S. didn't allow such price gouging, none of this would be happening.

I agree completely. We also have many non-Canadians in southern Arizona who go over to Mexico for dental work because the dentists in the U.S. are so expensive. When my Korean island dog (whom I brought home from my travels in Asia) had uterine cancer, I had her surgery done in Mexico, because the vets are less expensive (and just as good). An operation that cost $2000 in Arizona cost $235 in San Luis, Mexico. Now, imagine me, holding a sick pooch in a blanket, crossing the border. Yes, folks, it really happened! And she lived another three years, so it was worth it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree completely. We also have many non-Canadians in southern Arizona who go over to Mexico for dental work because the dentists in the U.S. are so expensive. When my Korean island dog (whom I brought home from my travels in Asia) had uterine cancer, I had her surgery done in Mexico, because the vets are less expensive (and just as good). An operation that cost $2000 in Arizona cost $235 in San Luis, Mexico. Now, imagine me, holding a sick pooch in a blanket, crossing the border. Yes, folks, it really happened! And she lived another three years, so it was worth it.

Top Billed, you just disproved yet another of my stereotypes: that TCM posters don't have Korean island dogs! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Top Billed, you just disproved yet another of my stereotypes: that TCM posters don't have Korean island dogs! 

Yeah, Swithin, we're shattering a lot of stereotypes today!  I say 'Korean Island Dog' because her breed came from a tiny island that I cannot pronounce very well, let alone spell correctly. She looked like a Pomeranian. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned earlier in the thread about THE MYSTERY OF MARIE ROGET. Apparently, Universal has just released it on home video as part of its Vault series.

 

Also available now is SUPERNATURAL, a 1933 horror film from Universal starring Carole Lombard and Randolph Scott.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

True. Sometimes stereotypes are joined with prejudices, sometimes not. I've had rheumatoid arthritis since I was a kid. When I was a teenager, it was particularly bad. I never wanted to use a cane. But I did often need to sit. I was sitting in one of the front seats on an NYC bus one day. An old woman got on the bus, looked at me, and said "I want that seat!" Normally, even in my condition, I would still get up for an old person, but I really resented her tone and that she assumed because I was young, I was healthy and should get up. She seemed to me to be healthy as a horse, despite her age, so I just said, "Sorry, I have arthritis." She shouted to the whole bus, "It's ok, he's arthritic!" (Or words to that effect).  I looked the stereotype of a healthy teen. Her prejudice was that I was therefore healthy and should give up my seat to her.  She claimed no physical infirmity, apart from the rights of her age.  I was going to say, "Leave me alone you old bag!," but I was a bit more civil than she was.

 

Oh SUUUURE, Swithin! Great way to perpetuate the stereotype that "New Yorkers are RUDE", dude!!!! LOL

 

(...I was talkin' about the old bitty here, not you of course) ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...