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Thanks for letting me know about I SAW WHAT YOU DID, being a Bill Castle film...

You are most welcome, Tiki! Let us know what you think about it if you get a chance to see it...have a most special day!

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I think James Whale's The Invisible Man is better than either Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein.

I'm a big fan of Universal's horror films, the first round as well as the second. I won't forget watching Dracula's Daughter as a little kid, on the old Shock Theater in NYC, decades ago. It terrified me then and it scares me still. It's actually quite an intelligent film.  As far as I'm concerned, Bride of Frankenstein is a work of art, as is The Black Cat and many of the other Universals. I prefer Werewolf of London to The Wolf Man. Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man is great fun. I'm also a big fan of The Invisible Ray, one of the first films to deal with the responsibilities of science:

 

Violet Kemble Cooper to her son, played by Boris Karloff: "My son, you have broken the first rule of science."

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As far as I'm concerned, Bride of Frankenstein is a work of art

 

I don't think there's any question that critics agreed with that in 1935 - and most still do, I'd bet.

 

And it almost is - except for one problem I have with it. I mean, I really love most of the movie - it's brilliant. But Dr. Pretorius and his little people are just too ridiculous. They take me out of the movie - every damn time.

 

Even as a child I remember thinking "this is the best movie ever made" and then getting to that little people part and I'd let out a groan. It prevents me from placing this otherwise magnificent movie on top of the shelf where most feel it belongs.

 

Don't know why it bothers me so much, but it does. Maybe I feel that they took a great horror movie and tried to make it a children's movie or something - get more ticket buyers for it that way. I just don't know.

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I don't think there's any question that critics agreed with that in 1935 - and most still do, I'd bet.

 

And it almost is - except for one problem I have with it. I mean, I really love most of the movie - it's brilliant. But Dr. Pretorius and his little people are just too ridiculous. They take me out of the movie - every damn time.

 

Even as a child I remember thinking "this is the best movie ever made" and then getting to that little people part and I'd let out a groan. It prevents me from placing this otherwise magnificent movie on top of the shelf where most feel it belongs.

 

Don't know why it bothers me so much, but it does. Maybe I feel that they took a great horror movie and tried to make it a children's movie or something - get more ticket buyers for it that way. I just don't know.

 

I feel the same way about those 'little people' as you do.   They are so ridiculous that it pushes the movie into the camp category.  All horror is borderline camp but to me a great horror film gets right on the border but doesn't cross it.  The rest of Bride does that (e.g. the idea of creating a mate for the monster gets very close to that border but it is handled so well it doesn't cross it),  but those little people,   yea, way to south of the border.

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I'm a big fan of Universal's horror films, the first round as well as the second. I won't forget watching Dracula's Daughter as a little kid, on the old Shock Theater in NYC, decades ago. It terrified me then and it scares me still. It's actually quite an intelligent film.  As far as I'm concerned, Bride of Frankenstein is a work of art, as is The Black Cat and many of the other Universals. I prefer Werewolf of London to The Wolf Man. Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man is great fun. I'm also a big fan of The Invisible Ray, one of the first films to deal with the responsibilities of science:

 

Violet Kemble Cooper to her son, played by Boris Karloff: "My son, you have broken the first rule of science."

I think The Invisible Ray is terrific and would look great colorized.

 

I love it when karloff destoys a boulder with a radium beam. :)

28ix9i8.jpg

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I feel the same way about those 'little people' as you do.   They are so ridiculous that it pushes the movie into the camp category.  All horror is borderline camp but to me a great horror film gets right on the border but doesn't cross it.  The rest of Bride does that (e.g. the idea of creating a mate for the monster gets very close to that border but it is handled so well it doesn't cross it),  but those little people,   yea, way to south of the border.I 

I like the little people!  One of the great pleasures of Bride of Frankenstein is that it's artistry, for me, lies partly in its self-consciousness. Everything is there for a reason. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was part of the Gothic horror genre of the early 19th Century. Like Melmoth, the Frankenstein "monster" is a kind of Byronic hero, an outcast; this comes across more so in Bride than in the first film.

 

Bride opens with Mary, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron at home on a stormy night. It's pretty well known that Byron and Shelley were having an affair. James Whale shoots the scene, for the most part, to emphasize that -- Byron and Shelley in one frame; Mary in the other. Mary's story takes that a step further -- the (you'll pardon the expression) effeminate Dr. Praetorius invading Dr. Frankenstein's wedding night, and taking him away from his wife. The mad (but intentionally campy) Dr. P.'s homunculi (little people) would be typical of Dr. P's character. Alchemists were obsessed with them in the Middle Ages; the fascination resurfaced in the literature of Victorian England. It makes perfect sense that Dr. P., eager to create a full-sized human, would have been fascinated by the homunculi. And of course, there are jokes in the film's homunculi:  the little king (clearly representing Henry VIII) wants to escape to get to his wife. Charles Laughton was shooting Henry VIII; it wasn't easy for him and Elsa Lanchester to get together at that time. So that's a kind of joke.  

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I like the little people!  One of the great pleasures of Bride of Frankenstein is that it's artistry, for me, lies partly in its self-consciousness. Everything is there for a reason. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was part of the Gothic horror genre of the early 19th Century. Like Melmoth, the Frankenstein "monster" is a kind of Byronic hero, an outcast; this comes across more so in Bride than in the first film.

 

Bride opens with Mary, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron at home on a stormy night. It's pretty well known that Byron and Shelley were having an affair. James Whale shoots the scene, for the most part, to emphasize that -- Byron and Shelley in one frame; Mary in the other. Mary's story takes that a step further -- the (you'll pardon the expression) effeminate Dr. Praetorius invading Dr. Frankenstein's wedding night, and taking him away from his wife. The mad (but intentionally campy) Dr. P.'s homunculi (little people) would be typical of Dr. P's character. Alchemists were obsessed with them in the Middle Ages; the fascination resurfaced in the literature of Victorian England. It makes perfect sense that Dr. P., eager to create a full-sized human, would have been fascinated by the homunculi. And of course, there are jokes in the film's homunculi:  the little king (clearly representing Henry VIII) wants to escape to get to his wife. Charles Laughton was shooting Henry VIII; it wasn't easy for him and Elsa Lanchester to get together at that time. So that's a kind of joke.  

 

Well I like those lttle people also as far as them being cute and the funny inside joke related to Henry VIII,  but I still wouldn't have 'gone there' if I was the director of the movie.   One of the things I like most about the Frankenstien movies is that there is a sense of realism as it relates to the science.   The little people don't fit that mode.     Just too campy and while funny,  a distraction as it relates to horror aspect of the film.

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Well I like those lttle people also as far as them being cute and the funny inside joke related to Henry VIII,  but I still wouldn't have 'gone there' if I was the director of the movie.   One of the things I like most about the Frankenstien movies is that there is a sense of realism as it relates to the science.   The little people don't fit that mode.     Just too campy and while funny,  a distraction as it relates to horror aspect of the film.

after pretorius gets blown up,wonder how them little people got along in them jars? :lol:

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I think James Whale's The Invisible Man is better than either Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein.

I agree with that opinion, Nipkow. Mainly because of Claude Rains' wonderful performance. I wish he had done more horror films.

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I agree with that opinion, Nipkow. Mainly because of Claude Rains' wonderful performance. I wish he had done more horror films.

it does say a lot for Claude Rains that he could imbue so much into a film with just his voice, bandages and those nifty glasses.

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it does say a lot about Rains that he could imbue so much into a film with just his voice, bandages and those nifty glasses.

I quite agree...he also did THE WOLF MAN in 1941 for Universal. It's been awhile since TCM aired it.

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Svengoolie on Me-TV

images8.jpg

 

 

December 20th: I SAW WHAT YOU DID (1965)

Teens spend an evening prank calling, and the consequences lead to murder.

 

December 27th: THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS (1940)

The owner of a coal mine takes a drug to make himself invisible and gradually goes mad.

Reminder to set your DVRs...

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Svengoolie on Me-TV


images8.jpg


 


 


December 27th: THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS (1940)


The owner of a coal mine takes a drug to make himself invisible and gradually goes mad.


 


January 3rd: THE BLACK CASTLE (1952)


A man tries to find out what happened to two friends who visited an Austrian count.


 


 


 


1bc.png


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I just love the James Whale horror films and enjoy his non-horror, too.  I wish I had ME-TV!  I have AT&T and used to have Directv and neither one of them carry it.   I used to watch Svengoolie and later Son of Svengoolie every weekend growing up in Illinois - what fun!

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I just love the James Whale horror films and enjoy his non-horror, too.  I wish I had ME-TV!  I have AT&T and used to have Directv and neither one of them carry it.   I used to watch Svengoolie and later Son of Svengoolie every weekend growing up in Illinois - what fun!

Is James Whale's Show Boat (1936) the greatest filming of a musical ever? I think maybe it is. The filming of "Ol' Man River," sung exquisitely by Paul Robeson, is gorgeous -- look at how that camera moves, check out that montage! Whale (along with Hitchcock) knew more than most English directors of the period that a movie isn't just a filmed play!

 

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Yes, I do like the Whale SHOW BOAT which TCM does show from time to time.  Paul Robson and Helen Morgan - terrific!  The second half bogs down a bit and I don't like Irene Dunne's blackface number (as mentioned on another forum) but I think the first half is near-perfect.  If anyone is familiar with the Whale biography (by James Curtis but I'm not certain) that came out a few years before the movie bio (sort of) GODS & MONSTERS, you'll recall that Whale, as a gay man, had empathy for other "outsiders" (like gay people, African-Americans, other Brits working in the Hollywood studio system, people with substance issues) and got along well with them and vice versa.  And Whale's films always look great which I think is partly due to his early career as a set designer in English theater.  I would love TCM to find and show Whale's first feature, JOURNEY'S END, which I've never seen.  It's set in WW1, written by the guy who wrote THE OLD DARK HOUSE (R. C. Sherriff - not sure of the spelling)  and starring Colin Clive.  Once in a blue moon TCM shows REMEMBER LAST NIGHT? with Robert Young - an OK screwball comedy  not as good as SHOW BOAT or his horror movies but interesting history-wise for those curious about Whale's filmography. 

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Is James Whale's Show Boat (1936) the greatest filming of a musical ever? I think maybe it is. The filming of "Ol' Man River," sung exquisitely by Paul Robeson, is gorgeous -- look at how that camera moves, check out that montage! Whale (along with Hitchcock) knew more than most English directors of the period that a movie isn't just a filmed play!

 

 

 

HEY! Waddaya tryin' to do here by postin' this video of "Old Man River" here, Tom?!!!

 

(...wring out'a my eyes the last few tears I got left in me after watchin' Jimmy do his George Bailey act the other night or somethin'?!!!)

 

;)

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HEY! Waddaya tryin' to do here by postin' this video of "Old Man River" here, Tom?!!!

 

(...wring out'a my eyes the last few tears I got left in me after watchin' Jimmy do his George Bailey act the other night or somethin'?!!!)

 

;)

Who is Tom?

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Who is Tom?

 

OOPS! Dang it Swithin! I'm sorry. I meant YOU of course, not Tom!

 

(...just chalk this up to you makin' me get all emotional here with that clip of "Old Man River", shall we?!) ;)

 

LOL

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Btw Swithin, I'll add here that your use of this clip from the '36 version of SHOWBOAT in order to express your thoughts about James Whale's great work as a film director, prompted me to venture to the YouTube supplied version of the same scene in the George Sidney directed 1951 version. And while I've always thought William Warfield's singing voice was superior to Paul Robeson's, I must say I think you're correct about how Whale's direction and his use of that montage during Robeson's solo does indeed show one of the reasons why most people consider the earlier film superior to its Technicolor remake.

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Just a heads up. This morning Me-Tv started showing the re-runs of the old Abbott and Costello Tv show. Started with episode 1 season 1. Me-Tv will be airing the show 5am every morning. Great way to start off the New Year :)

Thanks for letting us know...!

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