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Quentin Tarantino's List of Top 10 Greatest Films (as of 2012)


HoldenIsHere
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For those who are interested (and those who are not may skip this thread) below is the complete list of American director Quentin Tarantino's Top 10 Films from SIGHT & SOUND's 2012 poll.

 

The individual Top 10 lists for some of the filmmakers who participated were published in the print version of the magazine.

 

There are actually 12 films on Tarantino's list, which I think means there were two ties . . .or maybe Tarantino just gets to have 12 because he is Tarantino.

(Martin Scorsese also has 12 films on his list; David O. Russell has 11.)

 

 

  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966, dir. Sergio Leone)
  • Apocalypse Now (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  • The Bad News Bears (1976, dir. Michael Ritchie)
  • Carrie (1976, dir. Brian DePalma)
  • Dazed and Confused (1993, dir. Richard Linklater)
  • The Great Escape (1963, dir. John Sturges)
  • His Girl Friday (1940, dir. Howard Hawks)
  • Jaws (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
  • Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971, dir. Roger Vadim)
  • Rolling Thunder (1977, dir. John Flynn)
  • Sorcerer (1977, dir. William Friedkin)
  • Taxi Driver (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)

      

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For those who are interested (and those who are not may skip this thread) below is the complete list of American director Quentin Tarantino's Top 10 Films from SIGHT & SOUND's 2012 poll.

 

The individual Top 10 lists for some of the filmmakers who participated were published in the print version of the magazine.

 

There are actually 12 films on Tarantino's list, which I think means there were two ties . . .or maybe Tarantino just gets to have 12 because he is Tarantino.

(Martin Scorsese also has 12 films on his list; David O. Russell has 11.)

 

 

  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966, dir. Sergio Leone)
  • Apocalypse Now (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  • The Bad News Bears (1976, dir. Michael Ritchie)
  • Carrie (1976, dir. Brian DePalma)
  • Dazed and Confused (1993, dir. Richard Linklater)
  • The Great Escape (1963, dir. John Sturges)
  • His Girl Friday (1940, dir. Howard Hawks)
  • Jaws (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
  • Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971, dir. Roger Vadim)
  • Rolling Thunder (1977, dir. John Flynn)
  • Sorcerer (1977, dir. William Friedkin)
  • Taxi Driver (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)

 

The "Kill Bill" movies were quite good.  Like to make a joke but some on the boards are too sensitive.

 

2040.jpg

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For those who are interested (and those who are not may skip this thread) below is the complete list of American director Quentin Tarantino's Top 10 Films from SIGHT & SOUND's 2012 poll.

 

The individual Top 10 lists for some of the filmmakers who participated were published in the print version of the magazine.

 

There are actually 12 films on Tarantino's list, which I think means there were two ties . . .or maybe Tarantino just gets to have 12 because he is Tarantino.

(Martin Scorsese also has 12 films on his list; David O. Russell has 11.)

 

 

  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966, dir. Sergio Leone)
  • Apocalypse Now (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  • The Bad News Bears (1976, dir. Michael Ritchie)
  • Carrie (1976, dir. Brian DePalma)
  • Dazed and Confused (1993, dir. Richard Linklater)
  • The Great Escape (1963, dir. John Sturges)
  • His Girl Friday (1940, dir. Howard Hawks)
  • Jaws (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
  • Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971, dir. Roger Vadim)
  • Rolling Thunder (1977, dir. John Flynn)
  • Sorcerer (1977, dir. William Friedkin)
  • Taxi Driver (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)

 

 

How should one interpret 'top 10'?     Favorite films?    Films that infulenced his development as a director the most?   What he feels are the most well made films?    

 

I'm not really expecting an answer.   I just wonder what criteria he used to decide his top 10.    Now when I say top 10 I just mean my favorites.  

 

Anyway I see those Pretty Maids here.    So it was more then him just liking this film.    I missed Ben's comment.   Did he mention the top 10 or just say that the film was a favorite of Tarantino's.

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Ya know Holden, I'm thinkin' here that it's kind of a shame you specified "Tarantino" in your thread's title, and especially after also mentioning Scorsese and Russell in your opening post but only the number of films on THEIR list, as I believe this could make for an even more interesting thread if it were more about any and all notable directors' favorite films and not just Tarantino's.

 

(...aaah but alas...because no threads around here EVER go off-topic, my thought is probably doomed to failure, huh!) ;)

 

LOL

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How should one interpret 'top 10'?     Favorite films?    Films that infulenced his development as a director the most?   What he feels are the most well made films?    

 

I'm not really expected an answer.   I just wonder what criteria he used to decide his top 10.    Now when I say top 10 I just mean my favorites.  

 

It is a good question though.

 

The Director's Top Ten Greatest Films of All Time in SIGHT & SOUND was devised through a poll of 358 directors.

The 10 films with the most votes from the individual directors' lists comprised the Director's Top Ten.

SIGHT & SOUND published the individual lists of some of the directors in the print version of the magazine. 

I don't think the individual directors elaborated on the criteria that they used to come up with their individual list of the Greatest Films of All-Time.

 

At the same time, SIGHT & SOUND published a list of the 50 Greatest Films of All Time from the results of a poll by the British Film Institute of 846 international film critics. The BFI conducts the poll every 10 years.

The 2012 poll was the first time in 50 years that CITIZEN KANE was not in the top spot, moving to #2 after VERTIGO.

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Scorcese's Top 12 is a lot more eclectic than Tarantino's. It appears to be in alphabetical order.

 

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Stanley Kubrick
(1963) – Federico Fellini
Ashes and Diamonds (1958) – Andrzej Wajda
Citizen Kane (1941) – Orson Welles
The Leopard (1963) – Luchino Visconti
Paisan (1946) – Roberto Rossellini
The Red Shoes (1948) – Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger
The River (1951) – Jean Renoir
Salvatore Giuliano (1962) – Francesco Rosi
The Searchers (1956) – John Ford
Ugetsu Monogatari (1953) – Mizoguchi Kenji
Vertigo (1958) – Alfred Hitchcock

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Interesting list =  I would have to combine the two for my own list- I thoughrously enjoyed both "Kill Bill" movies- Tarantino loves cinema from art house  to grindhouse and it shows in his work.

 

Case study: the 1977(?) Charlie's Angels movie ripoff Seven from Heaven aka Angel's Revenge, which was featured on one of the best episodes of MST3K during the Comedy Central era. It's highly likely a film that influenced him because:

 

A. The plot is very much akin to the failed TV pilot Uma Thurman's character describes having appeared in in Pulp Fiction.

 

and

 

B. It has a bizarre story structure, with a flashback in the beginning that takes up an unexpected 2/3 of the film; not at all unlike the unique structure of Pulp Fiction...when you see it, you can see how he took inspiration in one positive aspect of an otherwise dreadfully bad, artistically bankrupt film.

 

Inspiration comes from all kinds of places.

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  • His Girl Friday (1940, dir. Howard Hawks)

It's one of my favorites too.

 

 

Yes,  His Girl Friday is one of my favorties and the only film he chose made before 1963.   This is why I asked what his criteria was for picking his top 10.   To me it looks more like a list of films he and I grew up with.     But maybe he just doesn't have the same type of respect for studio-era movies and especially pre-codes and noir that I do.    

 

To pick one movie made before 1963 and have it be His Girl Friday strikes me as odd.    Of course often one's reasoning is very simple;  He just found the movie flat out funny! 

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To pick one movie made before 1963 and have it be His Girl Friday stikes me as odd.    Of course often one's reasoning is very simple;  He just found the movie flat out funny! 

 

OR...in a case of extreme irony, Tarantino HIMSELF is really into "name-dropping", and thus really appreciates movies where one of the characters drops HIS actual given name into the story at one point.

 

(...OR, Tarantino just likes the name "Archie Leach" for some reason) 

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