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'Tis beauteous Maureen SOTM July 2014


Arturo
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While TCM gave short shrift to Susan Hayward's birthday tribute yesterday, preempting most of the schedule, tonight they give up a full night of films featuring another beautiful redhead, Maureen O'Hara. Included among the movies will be two films rarely shown she did at 20th Century Fox: SENTIMENTSL JOURNEY (1946), and FORBIDDEN STREET/BRITANNIA MEWS.

 

SPOILER ALERTS!

The former is a tearjerker with a dying Maureen entrusting John Payne with their adopted daughter. The latter has her as a 19th Century British miss being disowned by her family after marrying poor artist Dana Andrews; hw plays a dual role.

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Its not only tonite, for Maureen is Star of the Month!  Maybe you could retitle this thread to reflect that.  I'm wondering if there will be as much discussion of her as about other STOMs.  For, though she was a fine actress and could hold her own opposite anyone, I do not believe she ever had the ability to carry movies as others.

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Its not only tonite, for Maureen is Star of the Month!  Maybe you could retitle this thread to reflect that.  I'm wondering if there will be as much discussion of her as about other STOMs.  For, though she was a fine actress and could hold her own opposite anyone, I do not believe she ever had the ability to carry movies as others.

I didn't realize until I tuned in last night that she is SOTM. I don't see an edit button for thread titles.

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I didn't realize until I tuned in last night that she is SOTM. I don't see an edit button for thread titles.

Go to your original post. Click Edit...then you will see another button that says Full Editor. Click on that, and you will be able to update the thread title. You can also do this on your Linda Darnell thread, by deleting October 2013, so it is more current.

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I was able to record those 2 films and one other last night. Thanks for the spoiler alert, so I could avoid reading it. Havent seen any of those films..........I wonder if TCM plans to air that interview RO did with her? Wasnt she interviewed at the festival? Maybe its not ready yet......

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Viewed SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY (1946), and FORBIDDEN STREET/BRITANNIA MEWS last night.  First time for both of these.

 

SJ isn't really the type of movie I enjoy but it had some fine moments.   Interesting to see Bendix in his role since I was so us to him being in early noir movies.      My wife was crying like a baby!

 

As for Forbiden Street;  Well I just couldn't get into the Dana Andrews character as an artist.   Like with Bendix,  maybe I have seen him in too many noirs,  but he pulled off a musician in Night Song.    When he started to act like a cad,  that was the Andrews I was expecting.    But his voice?  What was up with that?    There were a few scenes where both O'Hara and his voice looked dubed like a cheap Japanese monster film.

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Viewed SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY (1946), and FORBIDDEN STREET/BRITANNIA MEWS last night.  First time for both of these.

 

SJ isn't really the type of movie I enjoy but it had some fine moments.   Interesting to see Bendix in his role since I was so us to him being in early noir movies.      My wife was crying like a baby!

 

As for Forbiden Street;  Well I just couldn't get into the Dana Andrews character as an artist.   Like with Bendix,  maybe I have seen him in too many noirs,  but he pulled off a musician in Night Song.    When he started to act like a cad,  that was the Andrews I was expecting.    But his voice?  What was up with that?    There were a few scenes where both O'Hara and his voice looked dubed like a cheap Japanese monster film.

 

Well, I think the best word I could use to describe my impression of SJ would be, "treacly", James. Gotta admit though that I thought little Connie Marshall was really good in it. 

 

And regarding FS, I was wondering who dubbed in Dana Andrews' really bad British accent in this thing when he played Maureen's first husband? I checked the IMDb website, and a few people there thought it might have been Alexander Knox, but to me it sounded as if his old "Laura" co-star Clifton might have done it.

 

(...THOUGH I suppose it COULD have been Knox DOIN' a Clifton Webb impression for some reason) 

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Sentimental Journey is a fine example of that good ole Hollywood

hokum, sort of way off the tracks but fairly entertaining. I figured

Maureen would be back in the afterlife, since the star usually is

not killed off two-thirds of the way through the movie. :(

 

Speakin' of which here Vautrin...a little known "fact" is that the original script for "Psycho" had Janet Leigh returning to visit Tony Perkins in a spirit form and tellin' him, "I KNEW something was wrong with you after that whole 'a mother is a boy's best friend' line of yours!" 

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Did anyone else see Robert Osborne's brief interview with Maureen O'Hara before TCM's showing of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" Tuesday night? It was done during the TCM Classic Film Festival in April. I was impressed by how sharp her mind and memories were at the age of 93. And her sense of humor was delightful!

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And I'll bet she also said to him, "If you think you're going to get into the

after world with that tired old print dress, you've got another think coming."

 

LOL

 

YEAH! How'd ya KNOW???

 

(...got your hands on that original script TOO, did YA?!)

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Yeah, it's surprising what one can pick up at a yard sale.

 

Yeah, you're right! In FACT, just a few weeks back at a yard sale I happened upon a(watch how I so smoothly get this baby back on track here) DVD collection of Maureen O'Hara movies!

 

(...ain't I slick) ;)

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JamesJazzGuitar ~ Thanks for confirming what I thought might have been my imagination. I watched a brief part of The Forbidden Street (1949) before giving up for the night. I noticed the phenomenon you mentioned: the voice that came from Dana Andrews's mouth not only seemed out-of-sync but sounded nothing like the actor attempting a British accent.

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Did anyone else see Robert Osborne's brief interview with Maureen O'Hara before TCM's showing of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" Tuesday night? It was done during the TCM Classic Film Festival in April. I was impressed by how sharp her mind and memories were at the age of 93. And her sense of humor was delightful!

 

Oh, D-mn! I missed that. I didnt watch it as i've seen it so many times. I was hoping they would show that as a complete interview. :( not just filler...

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A very professional segue, though I prefer the Gutenberg Bible I found on a table next to

a stack of old Reader's Digests. I do agree that the actress who played the mystical orphan

did pretty well and was fairly restrained in the role for the most part.

 

Yeah, little Connie Marshall intrigued me enough to go check out her bio in the IMDb website. She started out getting very good notices in her early career, but soon fell into that common fate of many child actors who would be "discarded" by Hollywood as they reached adolescence. She also played one of Grant's and Loy's two children in "Mr. Blanding Builds His Dream House".

 

(...btw...good find on that Gutenberg Bible!) ;)

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Beauteoufs?

The beautiful eggs of Maureen O'Hara?

 

I JOKE, I JOKE, I KEED I KEED.

 

Love your posts and wonderful taste in the ladies, Arturo.

 

Y'know, while watching Maureen the other night in How Green Was My Valley? I sat up and took note at how strong she is in the scene where she stands up for the knocked-up girl in church who is being publicly shamed and humiliated by a vicious Barry Fitzgerald (and for the record, I really prefer vicious Barry Fitzgerald to goopy, sentimental, touchy-feely Barry Fitzgerald. I wish he had played more b@st@rds.)

 

It occurred to me that her performances in Valley, as well as in The Quiet Man, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Dance, Girl, Dance are startlingly ahead of their time in their feminism. (it's been a while- too long- since I've seen Rio Grande, but I remember being quite impressed with her in that one too.)

 

I know there were other actresses who, of course, played strong women- but those four films present such ahead-of-their-time versions of strong women that it's worth sitting up and taking note. And I don't think Maureen O'Hara gets the kind of credit she deserves for it- maybe it's in part due to her beauty, maybe in part to the fact that she did do a lot of mediocre films- and in her later years- gave some mediocre performances (I'm looking at you, Big Jake ) and then of course, there is McClintock!- but, alas, her name is not often dropped in the same breath as Davis, Crawford and Katharine Hepburn when it comes to the greats who played strong women.

 

But it should be.

 

Here is her dance-hall speech from Dance Girl, Dance:

 

Judy O'Brien: Go on, laugh, get your money's worth. No-one's going to hurt you. I know you want me to tear my clothes off so you can look your fifty cents' worth. Fifty cents for the privilege of staring at a girl the way your wives won't let you. What do you suppose we think of you up here with your silly smirks your mothers would be ashamed of? We know it'd the thing of the moment for the dress suits to come and laugh at us too. We'd laugh right back at the lot of you, only we're paid to let you sit there ...

 

And then, there's The Quiet Man, which I know is a somewhat divisive film (for the record, I didn't like it the first time I saw it, it clicked on viewing #2) and she certainly plays a somewhat divisive character. I remember mentioning her role in The Quiet Man another time on these boards, saying it was a brilliant performance- far better than any of the five nominees for Best Actress in 1952 and I got pummelled for it.  So many people chimed in to say how much they hated her character in that film and how dumb I was for thinking she was great in the role.

 

Kind of bummed me out.

 

But the thing is, that's what being a great actress is: it's not playing the character the way that people will like; it's playing her the way that is true. And it takes that second viewing to make you realize Mary Kate is not being some small-minded, materialistic fool with her demands to have her property- she's striking out against the male oligarchy that controlled women via inheritance laws and dowries throuoghout Europe.

 

It's a performance that roars and triumphs, bold and maybe one of the most courageous of the 1950's; and it makes a fascinating companion to the others I've mentioned because it's a rare role that people living today can look at and say (at the risk of sounding hopelessly trite): you go girl.

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Beauteoufs?

The beautiful eggs of Maureen O'Hara?

 

I JOKE, I JOKE, I KEED I KEED.

 

Love your posts and wonderful taste in the ladies, Arturo.

 

Y'know, while watching Maureen the other night in How Green Was My Valley? I sat up and took note at how strong she is in the scene where she stands up for the knocked-up girl in church who is being publicly shamed and humiliated by a vicious Barry Fitzgerald (and for the record, I really prefer vicious Barry Fitzgerald to goopy, sentimental, touchy-feely Barry Fitzgerald. I wish he had played more b@st@rds.)

 

It occurred to me that her performances in Valley, as well as in The Quiet Man, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Dance, Girl, Dance are startlingly ahead of their time in their feminism. (it's been a while- too long- since I've seen Rio Grande, but I remember being quite impressed with her in that one too.)

 

I know there were other actresses who, of course, played strong women- but those four films present such ahead-of-their-time versions of strong women that it's worth sitting up and taking note. And I don't think Maureen O'Hara gets the kind of credit she deserves for it- maybe it's in part due to her beauty, maybe in part to the fact that she did do a lot of mediocre films- and in her later years- gave some mediocre performances (I'm looking at you, Big Jake ) and then of course, there is McClintock!- but, alas, her name is not often dropped in the same breath as Davis, Crawford and Katharine Hepburn when it comes to the greats who played strong women.

 

But it should be.

 

Here is her dance-hall speech from Dance Girl, Dance:

 

Judy O'Brien: Go on, laugh, get your money's worth. No-one's going to hurt you. I know you want me to tear my clothes off so you can look your fifty cents' worth. Fifty cents for the privilege of staring at a girl the way your wives won't let you. What do you suppose we think of you up here with your silly smirks your mothers would be ashamed of? We know it'd the thing of the moment for the dress suits to come and laugh at us too. We'd laugh right back at the lot of you, only we're paid to let you sit there ...

 

And then, there's The Quiet Man, which I know is a somewhat divisive film (for the record, I didn't like it the first time I saw it, it clicked on viewing #2) and she certainly plays a somewhat divisive character. I remember mentioning her role in The Quiet Man another time on these boards, saying it was a brilliant performance- far better than any of the five nominees for Best Actress in 1952 and I got pummelled for it.  So many people chimed in to say how much they hated her character in that film and how dumb I was for thinking she was great in the role.

 

Kind of bummed me out.

 

But the thing is, that's what being a great actress is: it's not playing the character the way that people will like; it's playing her the way that is true. And it takes that second viewing to make you realize Mary Kate is not being some small-minded, materialistic fool with her demands to have her property- she's striking out against the male oligarchy that controlled women via inheritance laws and dowries throuoghout Europe.

 

It's a performance that roars and triumphs, bold and maybe one of the most courageous of the 1950's; and it makes a fascinating companion to the others I've mentioned because it's a rare role that people living today can look at and say (at the risk of sounding hopelessly trite): you go girl. [/quote

 

Thanks LonaHanson, and great comments about Maureen. SInce I'm at work right now I can't comment fully,.other than to agree she did play a strong woman in many films, including her female pirates.

 

PS......Oops, I had edited the thread title,.not having originally realized.she was SOTM. I guess I added that F inadvertently. I will see if I can still change.it.

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Nicely stated post, Lorna. However, I've always gotten the sense that while she did play "the strong woman" very effectively in many of her roles, her roles with Wayne always seemed to have her ultimately bending to his will by the end of the movie. Though of course, that WAS the predominate man/woman dynamic of that era in both reel AND real life.

 

(...might that be the reason you say you got "pummelled" for stating this the last time?...not so much the quality of her performance(s), but the idea that her character's "feminist" stances in these instances only went so far?...just wonderin')

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Beauteoufs?

 

 

It occurred to me that her performances in Valley, as well as in The Quiet Man, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Dance, Girl, Dance are startlingly ahead of their time in their feminism.

 

I wonder about that statement. Do feminists really like Maureen O'Hara's work in a film like The Quiet Man? I would think she makes them cringe.

 

Sure, she's feisty and strong willed and stands up to a (for the most part) surprisingly passive John Wayne. That is, until the end, when the Duke drags her across the field, and toys with the idea of spanking "the nice lady" with a large stick. At the film's end O'Hara is serving dinner to Wayne and McLaglen just like a good wife should (I'm sure, in the opinion of John Ford, among many others).

 

In other words, the fiery Mary Kate Danaher has been tamed. She's that beautiful wild prize horse that has finally been roped and taught to know her proper place by John Wayne.

 

I realize that The Quiet Man is, for many, the Maureen O'Hara film and performance, and she's a joy to watch in the film (even though I find her character to be a real pain at times). But is Mary Kate, ultimately, a role model for feminism?

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Well-spoken, Tom JH. The kinds of things you discuss have always troubled me about QUIET MAN, despite its visual beauty and despite O'Hara's great performance. Every time I watch it, I get exasperated by her stuborness, withholding her "wifely treasures" from John Wayne as some sort of weird punishment to him for her brother's actions. The film does successfully generate our sympathies for Wayne's character to the point where I think men and women alike with their 1952 mindsets were meant to cheer and laugh approvingly when he finally "puts her in her place". We even get a little coda to make sure the audience knows that she's happily accepted her public humiliation and enforced submission, so no one should walk away from the film being troubled by it. If I could ever get them to sit still through it (highly unlikely), I would love to show this film to my two teenage nieces and hear from them what their 2014 perspective is on this presentation of what "a woman's place" should be.

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valid points, everyone who has rebutted.

 

all i can throw in, is that there is still dignity in fighting a battle that is ultimately lost.

 

it's curious that Maureen does both her best and her worst work opposite Wayne. I'm not trying to be negative, because she was a damn fine actress; but, every time I watch Big Jake, I wince at how bad she is; and I don't know why. And, yes, McClintock! has issues galore.

 

I am really looking forward to seeing Rio Grande again because, if I remember correctly, she's great in the film and it's a great study of a complicated relationship between an estranged husband and wife...

 

When is it airing?

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valid points, everyone who has rebutted.

 

all i can throw in, is that there is still dignity in fighting a battle that is ultimately lost.

 

 

In thinking of The Quiet Man, I'd say there is.

 

The ending of that film is largely a chauvinist male fantasy come true. The thing is, with Mary Kate's seemingly entrenched stubborness throughout the film and Sean Thornton's gentle tolerance, when Thornton, at the end, finally turns into more of the screen John Wayne that viewers know, a lot of female viewers will be cheering him on, as well.

 

Aside from however one may regard Mary Kate's change in character at the end (whether positive or negative), I don't think anyone would dispute the glorious magnificence of the actress playing the role, an actress clearly at the peak of her career.

 

In that respect, long live Maureen O'Hara as Mary Kate Danaher.

 

The+Quiet+Man+4.jpg

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In thinking of The Quiet Man, I'd say there is.

 

The ending of that film is largely a chauvinist male fantasy come true. The thing is, with Mary Kate's seemingly entrenched stubborness throughout the film and Sean Thornton's gentle tolerance, when Thornton, at the end, finally turns into more of the screen John Wayne that viewers know, a lot of female viewers will be cheering him on, as well.

 

Aside from however one may regard Mary Kate's change in character at the end (whether positive or negative), I don't think anyone would dispute the glorious magnificence of the actress playing the role, an actress clearly at the peak of her career.

 

In that respect, long live Maureen O'Hara as Mary Kate Danaher.

 

 

 

Do you mean female viewers when the film was released or female viewers now or both?    It would be interesting to see the movie in a theater today to see the reaction of female viewers to the ending.    I remember seeing Dead Reckoning with Bogie and Liz Scott.   When Bogie makes the comment that a man should be able to shrink women and big them back to life size only when they wish,  the women in the audience booed.    The men (at least the smart ones),  keep quite!    

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Do you mean female viewers when the film was released or female viewers now or both? 

Both, though today, obviously, the protesters would be far more numerous than at the time of the film's original release.

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As a film buff with a feminist bent, I would say The Quiet Man is a problematic film.  It's visually beautiful, well-directed, and has some spirited performances, O'Hara's being one of them.  However, I can't lay the character of Mary Kate at her door, so to speak, because this is a character based on the screenwriter's and director's vision, not hers.  The story is about a strong woman who is "humbled," and within its context was probably accepted at its time.  I don't find John Ford a director whose films are especially kind to women; his movies tend to be very "male" in perspective.  I actually find O'Hara's character in How Green Was My Valley and Ma Joad in The Grapes of Wrath anomalies, rather than typical of Ford, and of course he had to be relatively faithful to his source material in those two films. (I find early Ford preferable to later Ford.  The Searchers and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance are the only later movies that I really enjoy.)   I certainly wouldn't interpret O'Hara as being a "feminist" actress, although she often played strong women, and even women in action roles, as in Against All Flags. These roles may have been given to her as much as for her physical ability to play them (she's called a "tomboy" in her interview with Osborne).  Also, she photographed beautifully in technicolor, which made her ideal for action films which were often made in color.

 

As much as I like O'Hara, I still see her as primarily within the confines of the studio system where others had control over her films scripts, etc.;  whereas, I might call someone like Bette Davis a feminist because not only did she choose strong roles, she actually tried to command a great deal of creative control of her career at a time when this was difficult for a woman.  

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