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Taxi Movies


ElCid
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Looked these up on TCMdb, IMdb and Wikipedia. Believe following is correct?

Brooklyn Orchid, 50 mins., Jan. 1942

Two Mugs From Brooklyn, 45 mins., Dec. 1942 (AKA The McGuerins From Brooklyn)

Taxi, Mister?, 46 mins., Apr. 1943

Two Knights From Brooklyn, feature length, 1949

    Two Knights was made by compiling Two Mugs and Taxi, Mister? into one feature length movie.

    I have recordings of Brooklyn Orchid, Taxi, Mister? and Two Knights From Brooklyn.

    Apparently Two Knights From Brooklyn and Brooklyn Orchid contain all of the "taxi" material?

    Thanks, 

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Yea,  I had to look up her name by searching The Big Sleep.     Either way great minds think alike.   But in this case I can't say I was letting my mind do my thinking!

 

LOL

 

So, some OTHER part of your anatomy then, eh?! ;)

 

(...yeah, I certainly understand THAT, alright...Joy can have that affect on some of us guys, huh...too bad she wasn't in more movies)

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Yeah, Bendix is fine in those I suppose, but for MY money ya STILL can't beat Frank Faylen and Douglas Fowley when it comes to drivin' cabs! ;)

 

I'd go with Harold Lloyd in Speedy,

while driving him from downtown to Yankee Stadium.  After the ride was over, the Babe turns to Lloyd and says "If I ever want to commit suicide I'll call you".

 

And then there's the classic scene in The Great McGinty, where Brian Donlevy and Akim Tamaroff are brawling in the back seat with no holds barred while Frank Moran just keeps up this totally nonsensical monologue in the front seat, totally oblivious to the mayhem that's going on behind him.  Of course since he's technically a chauffeur rather than a cab driver, this may not qualify as an entry.

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My all time favourite movie cabbie:

 

dc33f00f-ba9e-488d-98ea-1d393e0b30af_zps

 

Tom D'Andrea in Dark Passage

 

Okay, okay, AFTER Joy Barlowe, D'Andrea is my favourite movie cabbie.

 

D'Andrea's laid back conversational style was perfect for the talkative cab driver who picks up Bogie's character and will eventually take him to the plastic surgeon that will finally make him look like Bogart.

 

This is a film noir with a lot of great moments, many of them courtesy the supporting players. D'Andrea's hilarious tale of the client that he picked up with a pair of gold fish in a bowl, followed by the "slippity slop" trip that they took across the up and down Frisco terrain is a memorable moment. The fish are slopping out of the bowl during the trip, thrown back into it again, only to get tossed out with the next steep hill. D'Andrea ends his tale by saying that they all got to the final destination.

 

"But you never saw a wetter guy or two tireder goldfish."

 

A classic colourful anecdote and D'Andrea, who had the screen just to himself when he tells it, sells the tale beautifully. It makes me wish that this character actor could have had more such opportunities in the movies.

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My all time favourite movie cabbie:

 

dc33f00f-ba9e-488d-98ea-1d393e0b30af_zps

 

Tom D'Andrea in Dark Passage

 

Okay, okay, AFTER Joy Barlowe, D'Andrea is my favourite movie cabbie.

 

D'Andrea's laid back conversational style was perfect for the talkative cab driver who picks up Bogie's character and will eventually take him to the plastic surgeon that will finally make him look like Bogart.

 

This is a film noir with a lot of great moments, many of them courtesy the supporting players. D'Andrea's hilarious tale of the client that he picked up with a pair of gold fish in a bowl, followed by the "slippity slop" trip that they took across the up and down Frisco terrain is a memorable moment. The fish are slopping out of the bowl during the trip, thrown back into it again, only to get tossed out with the next steep hill. D'Andrea ends his tale by saying that they all got to the final destination.

 

"But you never saw a wetter guy or two tireder goldfish."

 

A classic colourful anecdote and D'Andrea, who was the screen just to himself when he tells it, sells the tale beautifully. It makes me wish that this character actor could have had more such opportunities in the movies.

 

I agree that D'Andrea is the driver in one of the best,  if not the best,  taxi car scene of the studio era.   I love that fish story and what makes it even better is that Bogie is sitting in the back with a lot on his mind and here we have a guy telling him a very silly story.

 

Now D'Andrea is on to Bogie from the start;   I always assumed he told this story as a way to calm Bogie down and not to annoy him.     Yes,  a classic film noir secondary character.   Movies like this wouldn't be the same without guys like him.

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 Movies like this wouldn't be the same without guys like him.

Right, James. How much would we love film noir if those films didn't have players like this in them, even if they're secondary by nature.

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Right, James. How much would we love film noir if those films didn't have players like this in them, even if they're secondary by nature.

 

Dark Passage does have 3 secondary male character and each plays his part well,  the other two being Clifton Young as at cheap hood and Rory Mallinson as Bogie's friend George.  

 

I recall seeing Clifton Young in a few really good movies, like Nora Prentiss, and the Mitchumn noir type westerns Pursued and Blood on the Moon.        But the movie I remember him most in is That Way With Women,  where the lead actress part was played by,  you guessed it,  Martha Vickers!    He makes fun of her hat at a baseball game.     Sadly he died at the of age 34.  

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Dark Passage does have 3 secondary male character and each plays his part well,  the other two being Clifton Young as at cheap hood and Rory Mallinson as Bogie's friend George.  

 

I recall seeing Clifton Young in a few really good movies, like Nora Prentiss, and the Mitchumn noir type westerns Pursued and Blood on the Moon.        But the movie I remember him most in is That Way With Women,  where the lead actress part was played by,  you guessed it,  Martha Vickers!    He makes fun of her hat at a baseball game.     Sadly he died at the of age 34.  

Clifton James can also be seen in many of the Joe McDoakes shorts that air on TCM. James not only died young but terribly - killed in a fire.

 

And don't forget another of the key character actor contributors to Dark Passage:

 

darkpassage14_zpse4ccd0fb.jpg

 

Houseley Stevenson, a memorably bizarre performance as the back alley plastic surgeon, who at one point says that if he didn't like a man he could turn his face into that of a monkey or a bulldog. Here he is with our favourite cabbie, Tom D'Andrea. (Definitely best to be on this plastic surgeon's good side prior to surgery).

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I agree that D'Andrea is the driver in one of the best,  if not the best,  taxi car scene of the studio era.   I love that fish story and what makes it even better is that Bogie is sitting in the back with a lot on his mind and here we have a guy telling him a very silly story.

 

Now D'Andrea is on to Bogie from the start;   I always assumed he told this story as a way to calm Bogie down and not to annoy him.     Yes,  a classic film noir secondary character.   Movies like this wouldn't be the same without guys like him.

A little coincidence here. The thread is "William Bendix Taxi movies". You said that Tom D'Andrea is your favorite cabbie. Well,, in "The Life of Riley" on TV, Bendix was the star, and D'Andrea played his neighbor, Gillis.

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Hmmmm...well maybe if we try hard enough, we can replace Bacon with Bendix in the minds of people around the world in that whole "Seven Degrees of Separation" thing???

 

Okay, I'll start...

 

Kim Kardashian

 

(...and no...just because both William and Kim had/have rather large rear ends, ya can't use that!)

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What about James Cagney as Eddie Bartlett in The Roaring Twenties. Is he the biggest star to play a cabbie?

 

Ya know bd, you might be right. Well, along with maybe Don Ameche(a pretty big star in his day) in the very funny and entertaining 1939 film MIDNIGHT, and where he plays a Paris taxi driver.

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What about James Cagney as Eddie Bartlett in The Roaring Twenties. Is he the biggest star to play a cabbie?

 

Well, there's no question that the 1976 megahit Taxi Driver was the biggest moneymaker and most critically acclaimed movie about a cabbie, but whether James Cagney or Robert DeNiro would be considered the "biggest star" is one of those questions whose answer likely depends on how you doctor the argument.  Personally, I love em both, the movies and the stars, since they're both inimitable in their own ways.

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What about James Cagney as Eddie Bartlett in The Roaring Twenties. Is he the biggest star to play a cabbie?

 

Well, there's no question that the 1976 megahit Taxi Driver was the biggest moneymaker and most critically acclaimed movie about a cabbie, but whether James Cagney or Robert DeNiro would be considered the "biggest star" is one of those questions whose answer likely depends on how you doctor the argument.  Personally, I love em both, the movies and the stars, since they're both inimitable in their own ways.

I really don't think De Niro, as good as he is, has had a career approaching Cagney's.

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I really don't think De Niro, as good as he is, has had a career approaching Cagney's.

 

Really?! Well, considering he's won two Oscars and has starred in some the greatest films ever made since the 1970s(now now...don't pull a "FredCDobbs" on me here ol' buddy, LOL) I'd say he's AT LEAST "approached" little Jimmy in the pantheon of the great movie actors of all time, anyway.

 

(...though sure, he certainly can't do that whole stiff lookin' tap dancin' thing Jimmy could muster, I'll grant ya THAT!!!)

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Really?! Well, considering he's won two Oscars and has starred in some the greatest films ever made since the 1970s(now now...don't pull a "FredCDobbs" on me here ol' buddy, LOL) I'd say he's AT LEAST "approached" little Jimmy in the pantheon of the great movie actors of all time, anyway.

That's exactly what I'm doing. Since we on these boards are assumed to be primarily old movie fans, you've got to go with Cagney. I also have to say that I prefer Marie Dressler to Reese Witherspoon.

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That's exactly what I'm doing. Since we on these boards are assumed to be primarily old movie fans, you've got to go with Cagney. I also have to say that I prefer Marie Dressler to Reese Witherspoon.

 

Well sure. Little Jimmy WAS probably one of the top movie actors of all time, however when you used that phrase "not approaching" I just had to call you on that, that's all.

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