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Which Classics Would You See on the Silver Screen?


BasilBruce
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Hello all,

             I know that TCM presents classic films in large theaters across the country, but what films would you love to see in an actual theater? I was recently thinking about what it would be like to watch the Big Country or Libeled Lady on the big screen, as when you're in a movie theater all of your attention is focused on the movie.

Also do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?

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Hello all,

             I know that TCM presents classic films in large theaters across the country, but what films would you love to see in an actual theater? I was recently thinking about what it would be like to watch the Big Country or Libeled Lady on the big screen, as when you're in a movie theater all of your attention is focused on the movie.

Also do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?

 

All 4:3 format films (that's about 1:33 to 1). All such classics, and some that aren't so classic.

 

There is nothing like seeing the old films on big clear sharp screens. Luckily, many big cities continue to open up retro theaters all over the US.

 

I was lucky enough to see Treasure of the Sierra Madre on the big screen in 1948, Sunset Boulevard on the big screen in 1950. High Noon on the big screen in 1952. I saw Gone With the Wind on a big screen during a re-release in 1953. Invasion of the Body Snatchers on the big screen in 1956. And dozens more before 1960.

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Hello all,

             I know that TCM presents classic films in large theaters across the country, but what films would you love to see in an actual theater? I was recently thinking about what it would be like to watch the Big Country or Libeled Lady on the big screen, as when you're in a movie theater all of your attention is focused on the movie.

Also do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?

 

I don't agree that when one is in a movie theater all of one's attention is focused on the movie.    Don't forget there is the audience and that plays a role in one's viewing experience.    e.g.  hearing people laugh or cry can impact how one views a film.   

 

So yea,  watching a movie in a theater can impact one's opinion of the movie.    e.g.  "I didn't think the movie was that funny but most in the audience must of felt it was,,,  they were laughing like crazy".

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I don't agree that when one is in a movie theater all of one's attention is focused on the movie.    Don't forget there is the audience and that plays a role in one's viewing experience.    e.g.  hearing people laugh or cry can impact how one views a film.   

 

So yea,  watching a movie in a theater can impact one's opinion of the movie.    e.g.  "I didn't think the movie was that funny but most in the audience must of felt it was,,,  they were laughing like crazy".

So dramas are more similar on TV and a theatre than are comedies. That is because comedies are accompanied by audience laughter in theatres. That can either heighten the experience, by creating a spirit of mirth, or be distracting, if the laughter drowns out the dialogue.

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So dramas are more similar on TV and a theatre than are comedies. That is because comedies are accompanied by audience laughter in theatres. That can either heighten the experience, by creating a spirit of mirth, or be distracting, if the laughter drowns out the dialogue.

 

I agree that an audience plays a bigger role related to comedies.   Note that most T.V. comedies have a laugh track for a reason.    Dramas don't have a cry track!       But an audience can also impact the viewing of Horror films.   

 

As for comedy take a film like His Girl Friday.    The diaglog is hard enough to follow since the actors are talking so fast and often at the same time.   Imagine being in a theatre and having to hear the dialog over the sound of all the laughter. 

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See Lots of movies on the Big Screen with an appreciative audience in one theater this Labor Day Weekend in Hollywood. Cinecon 50 in Hollywood; What is Cinecon, Celebrity Guests, Memorabilia show; stay at the Loew's Hotel; become a Volunteer; profits go to film preservation; registration form.

Cinecon will be having its 50th Anniversary August 28th-September 1, 2014 at the Egyptian Theater, over 50 films, celebrity banquet, movie memorabilia show at the Loew's hotel.

 

Here are some of the titles scheduled for this years show. More films to come.

50film_eastwest2.jpg

U.S. Premiere of EYE Institute’s New Restoration of EAST IS WEST (1922)

Cinecon strives to bring film fans the opportunity to see the latest film restorations from archives and Hollywood studios, and we are especially pleased this year to be able to present the Constance Talmadge film East Is West for the first time on any American screen since its 1922 release.

Recently restored by the EYE Institute of the Netherlands, East Is West is based on a play written by Samuel Shipman and John B. Hymer, which opened Christmas day 1918 in Manhattan’s Astor Theater, and by the standards of the day was a tremendous hit, running for nearly two years, and racking up 680 performances. The play starred future movie character actress Fay Bainter in the role of Ming Toy.

Brought to the screen by producer Joseph M. Schenck and director Sidney Franklin as a vehicle for the delightful Constance Talmadge with a scenario by screenwriter Frances Marion and photography by Tony Gaudio, East Is West has been one of the most sought-after Constance Talmadge films, and this new EYE Institute restoration brings it back to the screen. For a preview visit: http://youtu.be/QySm_qotNMs

50film_alwaystrouble.jpg

ALWAYS IN TROUBLE (1938)
We’ve been reacquainting Cinephiles with the films of Jane Withers for that past several years, and here’s yet another of Jane’s top notch comedies in which a spoiled family learns the value of work when they’re castaway on a desert island

 

COURT-MARTIAL (1928)
Betty Compson plays Confederate raider Belle Starr in Court-Martial, a tale set in the immediate aftermath of the American Civil War co-starring Jack Holt.

50film_heaven.jpg

A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN (1940)
Gloria Jean, Robert Stack, and a host of policeman "uncles" played by some of the silent screen’s leading stars, including Charles Ray, Maurice Costello, Monte Blue and William Desmond. Directed by Andrew Marton.

50film_griffith.jpg

PATHS TO PARADISE (1925)
A truly unique silent screen comic was Raymond Griffith, whose inability to become flustered when confronted with disaster made his screen persona both familiar and unpredictable. Paths to Paradise is part Trouble in Paradise, part Cops, and all fun. Betty Compson is the "Queen of Crooks", and Griffith is the "Dude from Deluth" in this hilarious tale of crook vs. crook Directed by Clarence Badger, and based on the 1914 play Heart of a Thief by Paul Armstrong.

 

NIGHT OF JANUARY 16TH (1941)
Based on Ayn Rand’s 1935 mystery play, this was directed by William Clemens, who helmed the four Bonita Granville Nancy Drew pictures. Robert Preston, Ellen Drew and Nils Asther take the leading roles.

 

THE NIGHT BEFORE THE DIVORCE (1942)
A screwball follow-up to 1941’s Moon Over Her Shoulder, this film pits a hapless husband against his super-efficient wife. Resentment leads to infidelity, divorce proceedings and (believe it or not) murder! Lynn Bari, Joseph Allen, Jr., Mary Beth Hughes and Nils Asther star in this oddball comedy directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

HOLD THAT BLONDE (1945)
Twenty years after Paths to Paradise, Paul Armstrong‘s play Heart of a Thief was remade starring past Cinecon guest Eddie Bracken and Veronica Lake as the wayward thieves, with director George Marshall, at the peak of his comic powers, calling the shots.

 

HUMAN CARGO (1936)
Rita Cansino (soon to become Rita Hayworth), Claire Trevor, Ralph Morgan and Brian Donlevy in Human Cargo, directed by Allan Dwan.

 

THE BARONESS AND THE BUTLER (1938)
Based on the 1936 Austrian play, Jean, by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete. The Baroness and the Butler has William Powell as Johan Porok, butler to Hungarian Count Sandor (Henry Stephenson). He gets elected to parliament on the social progressive ticket, even as he vows to maintain his position as a gentleman’s gentleman. Joseph Schildkraut co-stars, and Anabella plays the spoiled baroness.

 

LOVE LETTERS OF A STAR (1932)
Blackmail, suicide, murder, a cover-up not to mention yachts and sea planes all wrapped up in an efficient 66 minutes of screen time with Henry Hunter, Polly Rowles and C. Henry Gordon in the leads, and Lewis R. Foster sitting in the director’s chair.

50film_travelin.jpg

TRAVELIN’ ON (1922)
A rarely screened William S. Hart Western, and, from all reports, one of his very best. Hart plays a mysterious stranger, in love with a preacher’s wife, who takes the blame for her husband’s crimes. Directed by longtime Hart associate Lambert Hillyer, Travelin’ On also features Ethel Grey Terry, Brinsley Shaw and James Farley.

transparent.gif

BUCK BENNY RIDES AGAIN (1940)
Three years before his long-running radio show really hit its stride, the full-blown character for which Jack Benny would be remembered was in evidence for the first time in this delightful comedy musical, also featuring Ellen Drew, Phil Harris, Dennis Day, Andy Devine and Eddie "Rochester" Anderson.

ONE IN A MILLION (1936)
In her screen debut, ice skating star Sonja Henie is surrounded with a top-notch supporting cast, including Adolphe Menjou, Arline Judge, Jean Hersholt, Ned Sparks, and Don Ameche. What more could you ask for? The Ritz Brothers? They’re on hand as well!

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT (1920)
The first screen version of Mark Twain’s classic novel about an ingenious New Englander who is transported back in time and place to the days of King Arthur’s England. Starring Harry Myers.

KENTUCKY PRIDE (1925)
Director John Ford and screenwriter Dorothy Yost put audiences through their emotional paces with this "kitchen sink" drama that includes just about everything that can happen to a horse in a horse racing movie and still end up with a happy ending. Henry B. Walthall and Gertrude Astor star.

 

As always films are listed here pending final clearance and are subject to change.

 

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See Lots of movies on the Big Screen with an appreciative audience in one theater this Labor Day Weekend in Hollywood. Cinecon 50 in Hollywood; What is Cinecon, Celebrity Guests, Memorabilia show; stay at the Loew's Hotel; become a Volunteer; profits go to film preservation; registration form.

Cinecon will be having its 50th Anniversary August 28th-September 1, 2014 at the Egyptian Theater, over 50 films, celebrity banquet, movie memorabilia show at the Loew's hotel.

 

Here are some of the titles scheduled for this years show. More films to come.

50film_eastwest2.jpg

U.S. Premiere of EYE Institute’s New Restoration of EAST IS WEST (1922)

Cinecon strives to bring film fans the opportunity to see the latest film restorations from archives and Hollywood studios, and we are especially pleased this year to be able to present the Constance Talmadge film East Is West for the first time on any American screen since its 1922 release.

Recently restored by the EYE Institute of the Netherlands, East Is West is based on a play written by Samuel Shipman and John B. Hymer, which opened Christmas day 1918 in Manhattan’s Astor Theater, and by the standards of the day was a tremendous hit, running for nearly two years, and racking up 680 performances. The play starred future movie character actress Fay Bainter in the role of Ming Toy.

Brought to the screen by producer Joseph M. Schenck and director Sidney Franklin as a vehicle for the delightful Constance Talmadge with a scenario by screenwriter Frances Marion and photography by Tony Gaudio, East Is West has been one of the most sought-after Constance Talmadge films, and this new EYE Institute restoration brings it back to the screen. For a preview visit: http://youtu.be/QySm_qotNMs

50film_alwaystrouble.jpg

ALWAYS IN TROUBLE (1938)
We’ve been reacquainting Cinephiles with the films of Jane Withers for that past several years, and here’s yet another of Jane’s top notch comedies in which a spoiled family learns the value of work when they’re castaway on a desert island

 

COURT-MARTIAL (1928)
Betty Compson plays Confederate raider Belle Starr in Court-Martial, a tale set in the immediate aftermath of the American Civil War co-starring Jack Holt.

50film_heaven.jpg

A LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN (1940)
Gloria Jean, Robert Stack, and a host of policeman "uncles" played by some of the silent screen’s leading stars, including Charles Ray, Maurice Costello, Monte Blue and William Desmond. Directed by Andrew Marton.

50film_griffith.jpg

PATHS TO PARADISE (1925)
A truly unique silent screen comic was Raymond Griffith, whose inability to become flustered when confronted with disaster made his screen persona both familiar and unpredictable. Paths to Paradise is part Trouble in Paradise, part Cops, and all fun. Betty Compson is the "Queen of Crooks", and Griffith is the "Dude from Deluth" in this hilarious tale of crook vs. crook Directed by Clarence Badger, and based on the 1914 play Heart of a Thief by Paul Armstrong.

 

NIGHT OF JANUARY 16TH (1941)
Based on Ayn Rand’s 1935 mystery play, this was directed by William Clemens, who helmed the four Bonita Granville Nancy Drew pictures. Robert Preston, Ellen Drew and Nils Asther take the leading roles.

 

THE NIGHT BEFORE THE DIVORCE (1942)
A screwball follow-up to 1941’s Moon Over Her Shoulder, this film pits a hapless husband against his super-efficient wife. Resentment leads to infidelity, divorce proceedings and (believe it or not) murder! Lynn Bari, Joseph Allen, Jr., Mary Beth Hughes and Nils Asther star in this oddball comedy directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

HOLD THAT BLONDE (1945)
Twenty years after Paths to Paradise, Paul Armstrong‘s play Heart of a Thief was remade starring past Cinecon guest Eddie Bracken and Veronica Lake as the wayward thieves, with director George Marshall, at the peak of his comic powers, calling the shots.

 

HUMAN CARGO (1936)
Rita Cansino (soon to become Rita Hayworth), Claire Trevor, Ralph Morgan and Brian Donlevy in Human Cargo, directed by Allan Dwan.

 

THE BARONESS AND THE BUTLER (1938)
Based on the 1936 Austrian play, Jean, by Ladislaus Bus-Fekete. The Baroness and the Butler has William Powell as Johan Porok, butler to Hungarian Count Sandor (Henry Stephenson). He gets elected to parliament on the social progressive ticket, even as he vows to maintain his position as a gentleman’s gentleman. Joseph Schildkraut co-stars, and Anabella plays the spoiled baroness.

 

LOVE LETTERS OF A STAR (1932)
Blackmail, suicide, murder, a cover-up not to mention yachts and sea planes all wrapped up in an efficient 66 minutes of screen time with Henry Hunter, Polly Rowles and C. Henry Gordon in the leads, and Lewis R. Foster sitting in the director’s chair.

50film_travelin.jpg

TRAVELIN’ ON (1922)
A rarely screened William S. Hart Western, and, from all reports, one of his very best. Hart plays a mysterious stranger, in love with a preacher’s wife, who takes the blame for her husband’s crimes. Directed by longtime Hart associate Lambert Hillyer, Travelin’ On also features Ethel Grey Terry, Brinsley Shaw and James Farley.

transparent.gif

BUCK BENNY RIDES AGAIN (1940)
Three years before his long-running radio show really hit its stride, the full-blown character for which Jack Benny would be remembered was in evidence for the first time in this delightful comedy musical, also featuring Ellen Drew, Phil Harris, Dennis Day, Andy Devine and Eddie "Rochester" Anderson.

ONE IN A MILLION (1936)
In her screen debut, ice skating star Sonja Henie is surrounded with a top-notch supporting cast, including Adolphe Menjou, Arline Judge, Jean Hersholt, Ned Sparks, and Don Ameche. What more could you ask for? The Ritz Brothers? They’re on hand as well!

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT (1920)
The first screen version of Mark Twain’s classic novel about an ingenious New Englander who is transported back in time and place to the days of King Arthur’s England. Starring Harry Myers.

KENTUCKY PRIDE (1925)
Director John Ford and screenwriter Dorothy Yost put audiences through their emotional paces with this "kitchen sink" drama that includes just about everything that can happen to a horse in a horse racing movie and still end up with a happy ending. Henry B. Walthall and Gertrude Astor star.

 

As always films are listed here pending final clearance and are subject to change.

 

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Why is the silver screen called the silver screen? The screen is not silver.

 

Most screens of the classic era had glass beads imbedded in their white surfaces which helped make them seem brighter and whiter when a projector light hit them, and so they looked like highly polished silver.

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I would love to see "Vertigo" and "Lady From Shanghai" on the big screen.  I'd also love to see "Smokey and the Bandit" which is a decidedly less highbrow film that some of the ones mentioned here.  I just love that movie.

 

There's a movie theater in my town, The Elsinore, that was built in 1926 and was originally a Warner Brothers theater.  It had it's heyday through the early 50s when Warners sold it.  The theater kept changing hands and falling into disrepair until the early 80s when it was deemed unusable and the city wanted to tear it down and put in a parking lot.  Thanks to the efforts of some concerned citizens, they formed a committee to fight the demolishing of this beautiful theater and finally in 2002, after 20 some years of various events that happened, the theater began to be extensively remodeled.  3 years and 3.2 million dollars later, the theater has been restored to its former 1926 glory.  I don't know if anyone is interested in theater restoration, but here's the link to the article for this beautiful theater.

 

http://www.elsinoretheatre.com/about/history.html

 

Anyway, my little history lesson had a point.  The Elsinore, in Salem, shows a classic film every Wednesday night during the Fall, Winter and Spring college terms.  The "Wednesday Evening Film Series" as it's called, is presented by the Film Studies class at Chemeketa Community College here in Salem.  A ticket costs $5.  Every week a classic film is shown, but they alternate between "talkies" and silent movies.  One week its a "talkie," the next week a silent, and so on.  During the silent movies, which I honestly don't often attend unless they're showing Buster Keaton or Chaplin or something, an organist accompanies the film on the Wurlitzer-- just like it would have been done in the 1920s.  I don't go to every movie they show.  Since they release the entire term's schedule ahead of time, I make a note of the ones I want to see.  Anyway, I've been able to see a lot of my favorite films there such as Psycho, The Birds, North By Northwest, Gentleman Jim, Sabrina, From Here to Eternity, just to name a few. 

 

I wish TCM would do some more of their theater events.  I did see Casablanca and Singin' in the Rain a few years ago when they were showing "for one night only!" which turned into two nights only (at least in the Portland area) because the events were so popular, they sold out. 

 

I love seeing movies in the theater, at least for me, I'm less distracted than if I watch movies at home.  If it's a movie I've seen before, I often notice things on the big screen that I've never noticed before.  For me, though, a lot of people that attend movies have a lot to learn about theater etiquette.  Nobody wants to hear your running commentary about the film; if you have to hack and cough through the movie-- stay home; and if you've seen the movie before, shut up about it and don't give away parts of the movie before it happens and, in the theater I go too, it never sells out and why oh why when someone comes in, they have to sit right in front of you instead of staggering themselves over a few seats.  This theater is old, it doesn't have stadium seating.  I'm only 5'2, give me a break and don't sit in front of me unless you're short like I am! Honestly, if I were rich, I would rent out the whole damn theater and only let people in who've proven their movie watching etiquette to me.  Ultimately, when my husband and I move into the house we're trying to save up for, we'll have a home theater and perhaps my annoyances with watching movies with strangers will disappear.  However, there's something to be said for watching a movie in a big theater... it's a Catch 22, I suppose.

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I agree that an audience plays a bigger role related to comedies.   Note that most T.V. comedies have a laugh track for a reason.    Dramas don't have a cry track!       But an audience can also impact the viewing of Horror films.   

 

As for comedy take a film like His Girl Friday.    The diaglog is hard enough to follow since the actors are talking so fast and often at the same time.   Imagine being in a theatre and having to hear the dialog over the sound of all the laughter. 

I guess the audience would have to laugh as quickly as the characters are talking, like 5 ha ha 's in 3 seconds.

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Movies that I've been lucky enough to see on the big screen:

 

A Streetcar Named Desire

Double Indemnity

Night of the Hunter

 

Also, there is a special film festival this summer at our art museum called "For Laughing Out Loud".  Each week starting this Thursday (through August) there will be a different classic film showing in the series.  I have tickets to see:

 

Hands Across the Table (Carole Lombard, Fred MacMurray)

Theodora Goes Wild (Irene Dunne)

True Confession (Lombard and MacMurray)

His Girl Friday (Russell and Grant)

Too Many Husbands (Jean Arthur)

Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday)

 

I'm super excited. :)

 

Also, to BasilBruce's question, "Do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?", I would say yes - I liked the movies I saw a lot more on the big screen, because I was more easily able to "be absorbed" in the scenes (but good writing and cinematography also helps...)

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You are lucky EugeniaH, Theodora Goes Wild and His Girl Friday would be very good films to see on the big screen.

 

Thinking more about what I asked you guys, I'd have to say that there are some films that I think have to be put on the big screen. I was thinking about Lawrence of Arabia and Ben-Hur. The epics would feel different I think compared to a movie house rather than an ipad.

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Hello all,

             I know that TCM presents classic films in large theaters across the country, but what films would you love to see in an actual theater? I was recently thinking about what it would be like to watch the Big Country or Libeled Lady on the big screen, as when you're in a movie theater all of your attention is focused on the movie.

Also do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?

 

Sort of a mute point now.  Whats left of many small theatres are forced to closed their doors due to the requirements of going to digital projection.  One would have to be lucky enough to have a theatre that can acquire the old classics on 35mm film. (luckier if it has its own film achieve)  I will not waste my time watching them on a big screen if digitally projected - it's not quite the same. 

 

TheParamount.jpg

 

paramount-theatre-austin-texas-marquee-s

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Hello, Hamradio,

 

yes, most of the screenings at this years Cinecon 50 are Film not digital.  The Cinecon staff would prefer all the films screened be 35mm (and most of them are) over 16mm and 16mm before accepting digital.  They have been doing this 50 years, and most of the people putting this on are film (not digital) collectors.  

 

 

Screening at Cinecon 50 Revised June 27, 2014

Cinecon is highly regarded among film fans for screening the rare and unusual films of the silent and early sound era—films that seldom get seen on a big screen. Cinecon combs the major film archives and Hollywood studio vaults to select often forgotten gems that deserve a fresh look and reappraisal. At Cinecon there is something for everyone—comedy, drama, musicals, Westerns. We show the latest restorations—and some one-of-a-kind rarities.

All films will be shown at Grauman's Egyptian Theater at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard, most in 35mm. Silent films feature live musical accompaniment. For a full list of films with screening times please check out our schedule page.

Society for Cinephiles present the 50th annual Cinecon classic film festival and memorabilia show in Hollywood over Labor Day weekend, August 28 through September 1, 2014. Cinecon is the oldest and the grandest of the movie related fan festivals, and Cinecon 50 promises to offer an outstanding five day program of unusual films, exciting celebrity guests and one of the best movie memorabilia marts in the nation.

Special guests will be announced as confirmed.

We also want to call attention to the dealers' rooms where collectors will find one of the best movie memorabilia marts in the country.

egyptsign.jpgThis year's host hotel will again be the Loews Hollywood Hotel located at 1755 North Highland Avenue next to the Hollywood and Highland entertainment complex. As in recent years all film screenings will be held in the Lloyd E. Rigler Theatre at the restored Grauman's Egyptian on Hollywood Boulevard.

We also want to encourage you to take advantage of our pre-event discount rate. Individually, festival registration and a banquet ticket would add up to $195.00. When you pre-register and book the whole package before Cinecon-- registration and banquet--the rate is $160.00--a savings of $35.

The discount applies only to registrations received or postmarked on or before August 20, 2014.

If you love movies, Cinecon 50 is the place to be over Labor Day weekend. See you here!

And as always, you can also reach us by mail for further information at: Cinecon 50, 3727 W. Magnolia Blvd.#760 Burbank CA 91505. Or by email at cineconinfo@earthlink.net.

 

Profits for cinecon go to film preservation!

Film Preservation - Nitrate Won't Wait!

everything.jpg

83% of American silent films are considered lost.

We Can't Have Everything, directed by Cecil B. DeMille and set in a movie studio with Tully Marshall doing a parody of DeMille, is one of thousands of American silent films that are not known to survive in any archive or private collection.

Part of the reason for this loss is the volatile nature of the silver nitrate film stock used by the film industry before 1950. When stored improperly the film will begin to decompose. Over time the emulsion (top layer of film) will bubble up and separatebadfilmstrip.jpg from the film base in random splotches and the photographic images will be lost. If left unchecked the film will continue to decompose until, in its final state, it becomes a fine brown powder that is highly flammable. Even when stored properly there is still a risk of nitrate deterioration. Many film archives are in a race to catch these films in time and preserve them for future generations to enjoy. But some films are lost simply because there is not enough money to complete the sometimes costly process of restoring them.

Cinecon is a strong advocate of film preservation and has made a number of grants over the years to institutions like the UCLA Film and Television Archive, National Film Preservation Foundation, Museum of Modern Art, Library of Congress, American Film Institute and the George Eastman House to aid the cause, and we are very pleased to say that some of our members have made individual contributions to these institutions as well. As part of our program every year we screen recently restored films and invite the preservationists to come and discuss their work.

badfilm.jpg

Some films that Cinecon has helped to preserve through its contributions are His Glorious Night (1929) the notorious early talkie that is said to have destroyed John Gilbert's movie career, Lena Rivers (1915) a rare early feature by actress Beulah Pointer who had earlier adapted the famed novel for the stage, Bud's Recruit (1918) an unusual example of director King Vidor's earliest surviving screen work, and Wild Bill Hickok (1923) William S. Hart's long unseen Western, for which Cinecon paid to make a screening print.

To learn more about film preservation or find out how you can make a contribution please visit the links above.

 

 

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Movies that I've been lucky enough to see on the big screen:

 

A Streetcar Named Desire

Double Indemnity

Night of the Hunter

 

Also, there is a special film festival this summer at our art museum called "For Laughing Out Loud".  Each week starting this Thursday (through August) there will be a different classic film showing in the series.  I have tickets to see:

 

Hands Across the Table (Carole Lombard, Fred MacMurray)

Theodora Goes Wild (Irene Dunne)

True Confession (Lombard and MacMurray)

His Girl Friday (Russell and Grant)

Too Many Husbands (Jean Arthur)

Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday)

 

I'm super excited. :)

 

Also, to BasilBruce's question, "Do you think watching a movie in a theater effects the movie in your opinion?", I would say yes - I liked the movies I saw a lot more on the big screen, because I was more easily able to "be absorbed" in the scenes (but good writing and cinematography also helps...)

 

Nice list of comedies to see on the big screen.     I have seen at least 10 Bogart movies on the big screen.   I live about 60 miles south of Hollywood and there are still a few movie theaters there and they use to run Bogie fest from time to time.  

 

As for being more absorbed;   Well that is true especially if one sits up close.    I remember sitting in the front row to watch The Big Sleep.    I only did this so I could see the start with Martha Vickers in her tennis outfit   (and yea Tom,  I got in yet another Martha Vickers reference!).

 

But after being in the front row for a while I had to move back.   One one feels they are almost in the movie that experience is a little too much.

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Profits for cinecon go to film preservation!

Film Preservation - Nitrate Won't Wait!

This is  "The Bluebird" (1918)  by which I've purchased from Grapevine video.  We all need to thank them for getting to this film in the nick of time.  Nitrate decomp is quite obvious.  

 

Check it out.  Don't know what's up with the bad sound which is NOT on my DVD.

 

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