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Paths Of Glory / All Quiet On The Western Front tonite


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Paths of Glory is okay if you like downbeat endings. None too cheery watchin' them three guys get railroaded by that crud George MacCready. It is certainly well-acted but if you're gonna take on a system, win! :angry:  Followed by the ever-popular All Quiet on the Western Front. That one is always good for me. You can really sink your teeth into it. I like the part where these WW1 german guys insist that if they're gonna go thru hell they're at least gonna do it on a full stomach so they put their boots down and demand being given the entire chuck wagon full of delicious grub. :) It's just like what Frank McHugh said last friday in The Fighting 96th...

 

"An army ain't an army unless it eats! It's just a walkin' famine."

 

WW1 Fighting men deserve grub...and plenty of it! :)

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Followed by King Vidor's Masterpiece THE BIG PARADE (1925). Without the blockbuster success of THE BIG PARADE, ALL QUITE ON THE WESTERN FRONT probably would not have even been made until decades later, just like PATHS OF GLORY. WINGS likely would not have been produced at all.

 

THE BIG PARADE brought back the War Drama to the screen. which had fallen out of favor with the public. And this is only the second time that the long awaited restored version has been shown on TCM, after it debuted last September 25th.

 

If you have never seen THE BIG PARADE before, don't overlook tonight's broadcast.

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I think All Quiet is one of the best pictures ever made. I was in high school when I first saw it and I remember sitting through at least half of it with my mouth hanging open. Lew Ayers is every mother's son, and the school kid's ambition to go to war is an all powerful scene. The butterfly, the sniper... Oy.

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I feel the same way about THE BIG PARADE. Still one of the finest films ever produced.

 

A few years ago. probably the fall of 2011 they had a guy on I think from George Eastman House, when TCM debuted the Silent version of ALL QUIET in prime time. The print was amazing, probably better then the Talkie. Anyway, the guest host said that the film is still considered incomplete to this day. They are still looking for missing scenes from both versions.

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Paths of Glory is okay if you like downbeat endings. None too cheery watchin' them three guys get railroaded by that crud George MacCready. It is certainly well-acted but if you're gonna take on a system, win! :angry:  Followed by the ever-popular All Quiet on the Western Front. That one is always good for me. You can really sink your teeth into it. I like the part where these WW1 german guys insist that if they're gonna go thru hell they're at least gonna do it on a full stomach so they put their boots down and demand being given the entire chuck wagon full of delicious grub. :) It's just like what Frank McHugh said last friday in The Fighting 96th...
 
"An army ain't an army unless it eats! It's just a walkin' famine."
 
WW1 Fighting men deserve grub...and plenty of it! :)

 

Macready played some of the least appealing characters ever. It turns out that in real life he was a really good guy. Sort of like Dan Duryea.

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Paths of Glory is okay if you like downbeat endings. None too cheery watchin' them three guys get railroaded by that crud George MacCready.

 

 

Yeah, you're certainly right here, ND.

 

In fact, the ONLY movie I can think of with an even MORE downbeat ending(and maybe you'll agree with me here...and somethin's tellin' me you will) is when Richard Carlson shoots that poor ol' water-breathin' creature in that there Black Lagoon and then it sinks to the bottom!

 

(...yep, now THERE'S ya a "downbeat ending", huh!) ;)

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Yeah, you're certainly right here, ND.

 

In fact, the ONLY movie I can think of with an even MORE downbeat ending(and maybe you'll agree with me here...and somethin's tellin' me you will) is when Richard Carlson shoots that poor ol' water-breathin' creature in that there Black Lagoon and then it sinks to the bottom!

 

(...yep, now THERE'S ya a "downbeat ending", huh!) ;)

Yeah, but ol' Carlson did stop them from plugging the gillman even more.  :) 

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Macready played some of the least appealing characters ever. It turns out that in real life he was a really good guy. Sort of like Dan Duryea.

 

In the same vein, this would be similar to how actor Wayne Morris, who so effectively plays the cowardly Lt. Roget in this film, in real life was awarded four Navy Distinguished Flying Crosses and two Air Medals during his military service in WWII.

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In the same vein, this would be similar to how actor Wayne Morris, who so effectively plays the cowardly Lt. Roget in this film, in real life was awarded four Navy Distinguished Flying Crosses and two Air Medals during his military service in WWII.

 

To me Morris does his best work in the film.   He was under contract with Warners and while he was in some very good movies like Kid Galahad,   he was only OK in those WB years (of course Kid Galahad had Bette Davis,  E.G. Robinson and Bogie so it as kind of hard to shine with that type of talent around).

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Paths of Glory is the only Kubrick film I've seen that I like without reserve.

 

I'm going to try attaching a youtube link below. It's a complete episode of Tales from the Crypt, an HBO show back in the 1990's. Kirk Douglas guest stars in a 40 minute episode that is an intriguing companion piece to Paths of Glory. It's called Yellow and he earned an Emmy nomination for it. 

 

I really recommend it; if you want to skip over the lame-o-la intro by The Crypt Keeper; please feel free, but check out the episode, all fans of Paths: (it's also, I stress, NOT a "horror" episode; introduction aside.)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjgLzzfZTPs

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I'm having trouble believing that Gen. Wesley Clark is saying that July 28th marks the 100th anniversary of World War I.  That conflict began with the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand (his wife was killed, too) on June 28, 1914, not July 28th.  Big oops on that one.

 

BLU

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I'm having trouble believing that Gen. Wesley Clark is saying that July 28th marks the 100th anniversary of World War I.  That conflict began with the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand (his wife was killed, too) on June 28, 1914, not July 28th.  Big oops on that one.

 

BLU

 

He also said something to the effect that it was a surprise that All Quiet on the Western Front won the Best Picture Oscar because it told things from the German standpoint, and they were our opponents in two World Wars.

 

All Quiet was released ca. 1931, ten years before we went to war with Germany the second time.

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Now why in the world are you guys so surprised about these little mistakes?

 

I mean, just like that old saw about the term "Military Intelligence bein' an oxymoron", there's NOW a few folks around here who ALSO think the term "TCM Proofreader" is an oxymoron TOO!!!

 

In fact, ONE guy around here even made THAT one of his "famous" "NEWS items" very recently on these boards, and so whatsamatter here?! Don't you guys ever read "The NEWS"???!!! 

 

LOL

 

(...btw Lorna...loved watching that Tales from the Crypt episode...you're right, it was very well done, but I kept thinking about the real life troubles Eric Douglas had...maybe that's why he was so good in it)

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In the same vein, this would be similar to how actor Wayne Morris, who so effectively plays the cowardly Lt. Roget in this film, in real life was awarded four Navy Distinguished Flying Crosses and two Air Medals during his military service in WWII.

 

Didn't know that about Morris. I had this film on in the background when I heard this voice that was so familiar. There was Wayne! I always wondered what he did years after his movies with Priscilla Lane.  I want to learn more about him. I like him.

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Didn't know that about Morris. I had this film on in the background when I heard this voice that was so familiar. There was Wayne! I always wondered what he did years after his movies with Priscilla Lane.  I want to learn more about him. I like him.

 

Unfortunately yogi, Wayne would die at the much too much of the young age of 45 from a massive heat attack in 1959, and is buried at the Arlington National Cemetery.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayne_Morris_(American_actor)

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I think Paths Of Glory is a much more complicated movie than it appears to be on the surface. While most people are sympathetic to the Kirk Douglas character in this movie I think military planners would fault him as much as the others for the outcome of the attack.

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anyone catch this one early today? Not sure if a premiere, but I hadn't seen it before.

Gotta agree w/Maltin review here, a German version of AQOTWF, without the sentiment or speechifying

 

3:00 AM
93 min
war

German soldiers face terror and despair on the front lines during World War I.

CastGustav Diessl , Claus Clausen , Else Heller .

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW: D: G. W. Pabst. Fritz Kampers, H. J. Moebis, Claus Clausen, Gustav Puttjer, Jackie Monnier, Hanna Hoessrich, Vladimir Sokoloff.

 

"Pabst's first sound film is a bone-chilling, unrelentingly bleak--and ultimately pacifistic--account of German soldiers battling their French counterparts in the trenches during WW1. Without the benefit of modern special effects, Pabst creates a vividly realistic, horrifying view of war, and effectively contrasts the tedium and sudden bedlam universally experienced by soldiers. Makes an intriguing double-bill with his KAMERADSCHAFT (1931). As powerful an antiwar statement as ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT"

 

2526_1_1.jpg

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anyone catch this one early today? Not sure if a premiere, but I hadn't seen it before.

Gotta agree w/Maltin review here, a German version of AQOTWF, without the sentiment or speechifying

 

3:00 AM
93 min
war

German soldiers face terror and despair on the front lines during World War I.

CastGustav Diessl , Claus Clausen , Else Heller .

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW: D: G. W. Pabst. Fritz Kampers, H. J. Moebis, Claus Clausen, Gustav Puttjer, Jackie Monnier, Hanna Hoessrich, Vladimir Sokoloff.

 

"Pabst's first sound film is a bone-chilling, unrelentingly bleak--and ultimately pacifistic--account of German soldiers battling their French counterparts in the trenches during WW1. Without the benefit of modern special effects, Pabst creates a vividly realistic, horrifying view of war, and effectively contrasts the tedium and sudden bedlam universally experienced by soldiers. Makes an intriguing double-bill with his KAMERADSCHAFT (1931). As powerful an antiwar statement as ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT"

 

2526_1_1.jpg

 I wonder whether Pabst won a blue ribbon for this film.

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I think Paths Of Glory is a much more complicated movie than it appears to be on the surface. While most people are sympathetic to the Kirk Douglas character in this movie I think military planners would fault him as much as the others for the outcome of the attack.

Certainly the outcome of the court-martial. Dax can plainly see that the defendants don't have a chance and the verdict already decided but he just stands there like a polite gentleman and takes it.

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He also said something to the effect that it was a surprise that All Quiet on the Western Front won the Best Picture Oscar because it told things from the German standpoint, and they were our opponents in two World Wars.

 

All Quiet was released ca. 1931, ten years before we went to war with Germany the second time.

Yes, I noticed that too. Which begs the question, which is more serious?  Mr. Osborne making a mistake about a film, or a retired general who does not know his military history?

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Yes, I noticed that too. Which begs the question, which is more serious?  Mr. Osborne making a mistake about a film, or a retired general who does not know his military history?

 

Actually Rich, while I think the General's statement could have been more clearly stated, I have to say I don't really think he was implying the thought that Germany was "an enemy" of the U.S. during the time AQOTWF was filmed and released, but more the idea that for a major Hollywood film to portray "The Great War" from the POV of a U.S. enemy during that conflict was somewhat of a groundbreaking proposition.

 

In more modern times, perhaps a correlative thought might be Clint Eastwood's 2006 "Letter From Iwo Jima" and his presenting the same POV aspect from Japanese soldiers' perspective and how even in the 21st Century still seemed to mildly jar the sensibilities of some American moviegoers who would view that film upon its release.

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Actually Rich, while I think the General's statement could have been more clearly stated, I have to say I don't really think he was implying the thought that Germany was "an enemy" of the U.S. during the time AQOTWF was filmed and released, but more the idea that for a major Hollywood film to portray "The Great War" from the POV of a U.S. enemy during that conflict was somewhat of a groundbreaking proposition.

 

 

Of course.  I was being semi-facetious.  On the other hand, I wonder if the teleprompter had directions on it, like "move your right hand every so often to let viewers know you're alive."

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Wesley Clark has his dates correct. While Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were assassinated on June 28, 1914, war was not officially declared until July 28, 1914. So strictly speaking, this month does indeed mark the one-hundredth anniversary of WWI. 

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Of course.  I was being semi-facetious.  On the other hand, I wonder if the teleprompter had directions on it, like "move your right hand every so often to let viewers know you're alive."

 

LOL

 

Yeah, well, it COULD have been worse, ya know Rich!

 

(...uh-huh...at least the General is a LITTLE more animated and at least uses a LITTLE more inflection in HIS voice than did little Matthew Broderick when HE hosted HIS Friday Night Spotlight series, RIGHT?!) LOL

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