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TomJH

The Crying Elephant

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In the 1927 movie Chang a baby elephant is tied up by a farmer if I remember right and the herd saves it by destroying the whole village.

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This one will touch you.

 

 

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Rampaging elephant stops after hearing baby's cry

 

QMI Agency Mar 12, 2014

 

, Last Updated: 12:48 PM ET

 

An elephant that destroyed home in the Purulia district of West Bengal during a recent rampage stopped after it heard a baby crying under the debris.

The father told the Times of India on Tuesday the family was sitting down for dinner when they heard a crash in the bedroom.

"We ran over and were shocked to see the wall in pieces and a tusker standing over our baby. She was crying and there were huge chunks of the wall lying all around and on the cot," Dipak Mahato said. "The tusker started moving away but when our child started crying again, it returned and used its trunk to remove the debris."

The girl had some minor injuries from the falling debris, but was otherwise unscathed.

Wildlife official Om Prokash said elephants are "gentle giants" who only come in contact with humans when searching for food.

The elephant has been blamed for killing three people and destroying 17 homes.

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A very touching story about the elephant. There are some people that think animals don't feel/have emotions. When I was 15 I got my first horse. She was in foal and when the little colt arrived my mom wouldn't let me keep him. We didn't have enough money or room for a second horse. After the new owner picked up the colt and left was so hard for me, but heartbreaking for his mother. She ran back and forth in the pasture looking for her baby. She had the loudest, most shrill whinny I ever heard. She looked frantic. This went on all night. She just wanted her baby back.

I know this wasn't about elephants but I just wanted to share my experience about an animal feeling pain.

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A very touching story about the elephant. There are some people that think animals don't feel/have emotions. When I was 15 I got my first horse. She was in foal and when the little colt arrived my mom wouldn't let me keep him. We didn't have enough money or room for a second horse. After the new owner picked up the colt and left was so hard for me, but heartbreaking for his mother. She ran back and forth in the pasture looking for her baby. She had the loudest, most shrill whinny I ever heard. She looked frantic. This went on all night. She just wanted her baby back.

I know this wasn't about elephants but I just wanted to share my experience about an animal feeling pain.

How traumatic for you and for your horse, mockingbird66.  Experiences like that really stay with you.  

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Related to my reply in the Mr Ed thread, a traveling animal entertainer had several miniature ponies and one elephant.  The trainer said it was more a pet. Lol.  Took the photos myself. A coal shovel is used for a pooper scooper.

 

261cbyq.jpg

 

 

waqag2.jpg

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Bravo! About time . . .
 
Ringling Bros.’ Circus to End Use of Elephants Company Says Public’s Concern for Animal Treatment Led to Decision
 
The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus says the "Greatest Show on Earth" will go on without elephants. Kenneth Feld, Ringling Bros. owner, said the last 13 performing elephants will retire by 2018. Photo: AP
Associated Press
Updated March 6, 2015 8:10 a.m. ET 

 

 

POLKCITY, Fla.—The Ringling Bros. and Barnum& Bailey Circus says the “Greatest Show on Earth” will go on without elephants.

Animal rights groups took credit for generating the public concern that forced the company to announce its pachyderm retirement plan on Thursday. But Ringling Bros.’ owners described it as the bittersweet result of years of internal family discussions.

“It was a decision 145 years in the making,” said Juliette Feld,referring to P.T. Barnum’s introduction of animals to his “traveling menagerie” in 1870. Elephants have symbolized this circus since Barnum brought an Asian elephant named Jumbo to America in 1882.

 

BN-HG347_0305el_P_20150305104233.jpg The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus said it will phase out its iconic elephant acts by 2018. Photo: Associated Press
Kenneth Feld—whose father bought the circus in 1967 and who now runs Feld Enterprises Inc. with his three daughters—insisted that animal rights activists weren’t responsible.

 

“We’re not reacting to our critics; we’re creating the greatest resource for the preservation of the Asian elephant,” Kenneth Feld told the Associated Press as he broke the news that the last 13 performing elephants will retire by 2018, joining 29 other pachyderms at the company’s 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in central Florida.

 

But Mr. Feldacknowledged that because so many cities and counties have passed “anti-circus” and “anti-elephant” ordinances, it is difficult to organize tours of three traveling circuses to 115 cities each year. Fighting legislation in each jurisdiction is expensive, he said.

 

“All of the resources used to fight these things can be put toward the elephants,” Mr. Feld said.

Los Angeles prohibited the use of bull-hooks by elephant trainers and handlers last April. Oakland, California, did likewise in December, banning the devices used to keep elephants in control. Last month, the city of Asheville, North Carolina nixed wild or exotic animals from performing in the municipally-owned, 7,600-seat U.S. Cellular Center.

 

“There’s been somewhat of a mood shift among our consumers,” said Alana Feld, the company’s executive vice president. “A lot of people aren’t comfortable with us touring with our elephants.”

Ingrid E. Newkirk,the president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, said her group made that happen.

 

“For 35 years PETA has protested Ringling Bros.’ cruelty to elephants,” she wrote in a statement. “We know extreme abuse to these majestic animals occurs every single day, so if Ringling is really telling the truth about ending this horror, it will be a day to pop the champagne corks, and rejoice…If the decision is serious, then the circus needs to do it NOW.”

 

Carol Bradley,the author of the book “Last Chain on Billie: How One Extraordinary Elephant Escaped the Big Top,” which is about a non-Ringling circus elephant, said she believes the Feld family “realized it was a losing PR battle.”

 

“This is an enormous, earth-moving decision,” she said. “When I heard the news, my jaw hit the floor. I never thought they’d change their minds about this.”

 

She wondered if the Feld family’s decision had anything to do with the fallout over “Blackfish,” a documentary exploring why the orca Tilikum killed SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau in 2010.

The documentary argues that killer whales in captivity become more aggressive to humans and each other. Since it aired, several entertainers pulled out of performances at SeaWorld Entertainment Inc.parks, and Southwest Airlinesended its marketing partnership.

 

Ringling also has been targeted by activists who say forcing animals to perform is cruel and unnecessary.

 

In 2014, Feld Entertainment won $25.2 million in settlements from groups including the Humane Society of the United States, ending a 14-year legal battle over allegations that circus employees mistreated elephants.

 

The initial lawsuit was filed by a former Ringling barn helper who accepted at least $190,000 from animal-rights groups. The judge called him “essentially a paid plaintiff” who lacked credibility and standing to sue, and rejected the abuse claims.

 

Kenneth Feld testified about the elephants’ importance to the show during that 2009 trial.

“The symbol of the ‘Greatest Show on Earth’ is the elephant, and that’s what we’ve been known for throughout the world for more than a hundred years,” he said.

 

Asked by a lawyer whether the show would be the same without elephants, Feld replied, “No, it wouldn’t.”

 

Asked again this week, he said, “Things have changed.”

 

Pat Cuviello, a San Mateo, California-based animal activist who has protested and videotaped Ringling’s animals since 1988, said he was ecstatic to hear the news.

 

“I hope at some point they get rid of all the animals in all the circuses,” he said.

 

For now, animals remain part of this circus: Tigers, dogs and goats are still performing, and a Mongolian troupe of camel stunt riders joined its Circus Xtreme show this year. But audiences can expect more motor sports, daredevils and feats of human physical capabilities to be showcased in the future.

 

With a total of 43 elephants, Feld owns the largest herd in North America, and spends about $65,000 yearly to care for each one. New structures will be needed to house the retiring elephants at the rural center, which is close enough to Orlando to attract tourists eventually if that is what Feld decides to offer.

 

Kenneth Feld said initially the center will be open only to scientists and others studying the Asian elephant, but he “hopes it expands to something the public will be able to see.”

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The Ringling Brothers train occasionally goes through my area.  It stopped a couple of times for the locomotive to take on supplies and for the people/animals to rest.  I went up to the elephant car, even though they were shackled, the leg irons were loosely worn and I saw no type of mistreatment. The elephants were calm and gentle.  Another American icon about to become history. sigh.

 

(sample photo)

slideshow_1002314326_APTOPIX_South_Carol

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The elephants in "300" are CGI, that's why them falling off a cliff don't bother me. (no harm, no foul)

 

2828014-300elephant.jpg

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The Ringling Brothers train occasionally goes through my area.  It stopped a couple of times for the locomotive to take on supplies and for the people/animals to rest.  I went up to the elephant car, even though they were shackled, the leg irons were loosely worn and I saw no type of mistreatment. The elephants were calm and gentle.  Another American icon about to become history. sigh.

 

(sample photo)

slideshow_1002314326_APTOPIX_South_Carol

The writing was on the wall in 2013 when the Los Angeles City Council (I love LA!) banned the bullhook, the weapon (like a fireplace poker), used to control them.  Oakland banned the bullhook last December.

 

Circus elephants spend their lives in cramped cages and trailers. The leg shackles prevent them from taking more than one step, and elephants are critters who like to be on the move.   They do not have regular care.  (Circus elephants who are retired to sanctuaries normally have arthritis, foot sores, and other health problems.)  The abuse and unnatural conditions can result in those swaying and repetitive movements you sometimes see in circus or zoo animals.

 

They are trained with intimidation and physical abuse.  They are beaten, whipped, shocked, and denied food and water if they act up.  They are taught that if they disobey their trainers they will be hurt.  They are forced to perform uncomfortable, painful acts.  (This has all been documented.)  They occasionally rebel by attacking or killing trainers, rampaging, etc.

 

The circus is no circus for elephants, and I say 2018 cannot come soon enough for them.

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The Ringling Brothers train occasionally goes through my area.  It stopped a couple of times for the locomotive to take on supplies and for the people/animals to rest.  I went up to the elephant car, even though they were shackled, the leg irons were loosely worn and I saw no type of mistreatment. The elephants were calm and gentle.  Another American icon about to become history. sigh.

 

(sample photo)

 

 

I say another shameful and cruel practice about to become history.    Great!  

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16525791317_7611d6fcf7_c.jpgElephant Drinking at Water Hole, Chobe National Park, Botswana

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This has nothing to do with elephants but it does deal with what I strongly suspect was animal cruelty.

 

For years a tiny carnival (comprised of games and rides) has set up camp twice a summer in a corner of the plaza at the top of my street. For a number of years the attractions included a pony ride. The pony, however, was tethered to a long thin plank of wood forcing it to walk in a circle, with kids riding on its back.

 

It pained me to look at this tiny pony, whose head was always bowed, whether walking or standing still, hair covering his eyes. I remember how, when there were no kids riding on him, the pony would stand still, head always bowed, almost like a statue. This completely submissive little animal barely looked as if he had any life in him. I seriously wondered if he might be blind or, at least, had seriously impaired vision.He never raised his head to look at anybody.

 

There was a small trailer off to the side, with bits of hay sticking out underneath its door, obviously the pony's home. I never saw anyone strike the pony (obviously with paying customers around) but the conditions of its existence were such that it must have lead a miserable life, being cooped up in a dingy trailer, taken from plaza to plaza, and then tethered to that wood.

 

A number of years ago the pony ride disappeared as an attraction, and, for that, I was glad. I sometimes wonder what may have been the fate of that little pony.

 

In any event, I am glad that within three years (wish it was sooner) elephants will be freed from the unnatural and, I'm sure, cruel life that they must suffer at Barnum and Bailey's.

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FREE ALL DOGS, CATS, GOLDFISH, CANARIES, and COCKATOOS!!  KEEPING PETS IS THE LOWEST AND MOST VIRULENT SLAVERY on the face of the EARTH!!  FREEDOM, FREEDOM NOW!!  KNIT SWEATERS FOR THE FIELD MICE!!  HUG A MOSQUITO TODAY!!  This extreme silliness is what we are moving towards.  I had fried chicken tonight and did not shed a tear for the chicken.  Imagine that.  I am also a hunter and a fisherman and I shed no tears as I eat their flesh.  My long dead father was a cattle rancher and I am proud to have come from the ranching heritage.  The older I get the sillier the human race evolves.  Now a circus is thought to be a criminal enterprise as are the makers of a mink coat.  Leather???  How dare anyone own something made of leather!! 

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FREE ALL DOGS, CATS, GOLDFISH, CANARIES, and COCKATOOS!!  KEEPING PETS IS THE LOWEST AND MOST VIRULENT SLAVERY on the face of the EARTH!!  FREEDOM, FREEDOM NOW!!  KNIT SWEATERS FOR THE FIELD MICE!!  HUG A MOSQUITO TODAY!!  This extreme silliness is what we are moving towards.  I had fried chicken tonight and did not shed a tear for the chicken.  Imagine that.  I am also a hunter and a fisherman and I shed no tears as I eat their flesh.  My long dead father was a cattle rancher and I am proud to have come from the ranching heritage.  The older I get the sillier the human race evolves.  Now a circus is thought to be a criminal enterprise as are the makers of a mink coat.  Leather???  How dare anyone own something made of leather!! 

 

I don't believe in mistreating animals (cruelty towards them) but you are right when it come to food animals.  Chickens, cows, pigs, etc are needed for food and animal right activist do tend to go overboard at times..  The human brain needs protein from meat for proper development  Man has always hunted, fish, raised animals for survival.

 

Any endangered animal i.e. tigers, giant pandas need be saved from extinction.

 

By the way deer hunting is VERY POPULAR in my area.

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