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Initially one of the items on my bucket list (I actually have one) was to watch every picture that has won the "Best Picture (Production)" award from the Academy.  I have now watched 82 of 86 of them.  Now that I have come close to achieving my goal, I have started watching every movie ever nominated for the "Best Picture" award.  I have created a spread sheet and am actively working to watch all 512 movies.  I am wondering if anyone out there as done this.  I have been working on it since approximately January, 2014, and have around 140 more movies to watch.  I would love to be able to discuss this "quest" with anyone who is also doing this or has achieved this. Please respond and I will definitely get back to you!  Thanks! B)

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That's an interesting quest.  About the only one I've got that would match it in intent if not in scope is my goal of eventually seeing every movie by Barbara Stanwyck.  I'm up to about 65 so far, but there are still some that are yet to come. :)

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Thanks so much for responding.  That is interesting.  What made you chose Barbara Stanwyck?  What made you decide to watch her movies?

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hate to burst your bubble, but there are a few Best Picture nominees that whose prints have been lost or destroyed, so I don't think you or anyone can "officially" see all the nominees for BP that have ever been.

 

The Patriot from 1929 and The White Parade from 1934 come to mind immediately as two nominees that don't have complete prints still extant.

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Thanks so much for responding.  That is interesting.  What made you chose Barbara Stanwyck?  What made you decide to watch her movies?

 

Two reasons, one major and one minor.

 

Main reason:  IMO she was (and is) the greatest actress who's ever walked the face of the Earth, and right up there with Toshiro Mifune and Jean Gabin as one of the three greatest actors.  Never typecast, always interesting, capable of portraying every conceivable human emotion in the most naturalistic manner.  She was as good at listening her lines as she was at speaking them, a very underrated skill in an actor. She's not the only actress who's played a wide variety of parts, but there's no other actress with her emotional range, from tender and vulnerable to hard boiled murderous, with every stop on the way in between.

 

Minor reason:  With only a tiny handful of exceptions, her movies are set in the present, and she never did costume dramas, which I hate with a passion.  Some might see that as a limitation, but for me it's a feature, not a bug.

 

And one final reason:  TCM has access to just about all her movies, and shows nearly all of them on a fairly regular basis.  Of the 65 or so films of hers that I've seen to date, I've been able to record 61 of them from TCM.  One more reason TCM has my eternal gratitude.

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And one final reason:  TCM has access to just about all [of Barbara Stanwyck's] movies, and shows nearly all of them on a fairly regular basis.  Of the 65 or so films of hers that I've seen to date, I've been able to record 61 of them from TCM.  One more reason TCM has my eternal gratitude.

 

Have you seen No Man of Her Own (1950) ? It is my personal favorite Stanwyck film; it never airs on TCM (it's Paramount, I think.) It is on DVD through Olive Films though and sometimes it shows up on youtube.

 

Highly, highly recommended.

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A few months ago I started actively working on the simple Best Picture quest.  Not spending too much time on it but I do have the list that I check off - my count is now in the 50s out of 86 if my numbers are right.  I had also thought about the super quest, but I must admit it sounds pretty daunting.  (I considered putting this list together after I watched some 'lesser' winners and wondered what the competition was.  "Surely there had to be a better picture than this?!")

 

For the last few years I have tried to watch all of the new nominees - it became much more difficult when the Academy changed the procedure to allow more than 5 for Best Picture.  For the last 4 years I've seen all but 3 of the nominees - no brag intended, it was painful at times.

 

Thanks also LHF for the Stanwyck suggestion.  My current Stanwyck favorite is Remember the Night, but I'm originally from Indiana so I have a soft spot there.  Will have to check out NMoHO.

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The Patriot from 1929 and The White Parade from 1934 come to mind immediately as two nominees that don't have compete prints still extant.

 

The Patriot is essentially lost, aside from trailers and fragments. The White Parade has one surviving (incomplete) print at the UCLA film archive. You can see it if you make an appointment.

 

Anyone here seen East Lynne (1931)? It's the only other BP nominee never to be officially released on home video (though bootlegs exist).

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And one final reason:  TCM has access to just about all [of Barbara Stanwyck's] movies, and shows nearly all of them on a fairly regular basis.  Of the 65 or so films of hers that I've seen to date, I've been able to record 61 of them from TCM.  One more reason TCM has my eternal gratitude.

 

Have you seen No Man of Her Own (1950) ? It is my personal favorite Stanwyck film; it never airs on TCM (it's Paramount, I think.) It is on DVD through Olive Films though and sometimes it shows up on youtube.

 

Highly, highly recommended.

 

That's been on my "Saved" line at Netflix for several years now.  One of these years they'll get around to releasing it.  But in the meantime, I just found it on Bonanza for $6.79, so thanks for the heads up about the DVD. :)

 

P.S.  Right now there are only short clips of it on YouTube.

 

P.P.S.  There are so many of my "favorite" Stanwyck movies that it's almost impossible to narrow it down, but if I had to take five, it'd be So Big, Baby Face, Stella Dallas, Double Indemnity, and These Wilder Years.  And even though I usually can't stand westerns, I loved her in The Violent Men with Edward G. Robinson and Glenn Ford.  She could play evil with the best of them, and not just in Double Indemnity or The File on Thelma Jordan.

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Have you seen No Man of Her Own (1950) ?

 

That's been on my "Saved" line at Netflix for several years now.  One of these years they'll get around to releasing it.  But in the meantime, I just found it on Bonanza for $6.79, so thanks for the heads up about the DVD. :)

 

Daaamn. I'm tempted to sneak over there and outbid you.

 

There's a new classic DVD releasing company called Olive Films, they're a lot cheaper than Criterion and just as good (if not better) when it comes to print quality, extras, etc. They're the ones who did NMoHo.

 

No Man of Her Own, based on the novel I Married a Dead Man! by Cornell Woolrich is (for the most part) an extra moody and dark film noir, with a really terrific performance by Stanwyck as (for once) a sympathetic and good character living in Dark City.

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Okay, I just found the Olive version online, although I'd already ordered the Bonanza copy.  The Olive edition is $18.71, so I still probably would have gone  with the cheaper version.  I am so looking forward to actually seeing this movie, given that I've read about it in about half a dozen different books.

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A few months ago I started actively working on the simple Best Picture quest.  Not spending too much time on it but I do have the list that I check off - my count is now in the 50s out of 86 if my numbers are right.  I had also thought about the super quest, but I must admit it sounds pretty daunting.  (I considered putting this list together after I watched some 'lesser' winners and wondered what the competition was.  "Surely there had to be a better picture than this?!")

 

For the last few years I have tried to watch all of the new nominees - it became much more difficult when the Academy changed the procedure to allow more than 5 for Best Picture.  For the last 4 years I've seen all but 3 of the nominees - no brag intended, it was painful at times.

 

Thanks also LHF for the Stanwyck suggestion.  My current Stanwyck favorite is Remember the Night, but I'm originally from Indiana so I have a soft spot there.  Will have to check out NMoHO.

Thanks for sharing!  I have found the more "Best Picture" nominees I watch, the more I am able to pick up on influences on other films.  I originally started this as a goal to be achieved but I am finding that the process of watching these films is providing my so much awareness and insight to other films!

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The Patriot is essentially lost, aside from trailers and fragments. The White Parade has one surviving (incomplete) print at the UCLA film archive. You can see it if you make an appointment.

 

Anyone here seen East Lynne (1931)? It's the only other BP nominee never to be officially released on home video (though bootlegs exist).

Thanks for sharing this.  I would eventually discovered this but this does make it easier.   I suppose I will have adjust my bucket list to "All the available best picture nominees."

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If anyone else is interested in doing this, I would definitely be interested in providing mutual support and ongoing dialogue.  I generally watch one movie a day.  I watched A Clockwork Orange today.  I am still trying to process it. 

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Sorry for the sidetrack again, but I just finished watching No Man of Her Own (1950 version).  Don't want to spoil it for others who are also planning to see it for the first time, but what a fine Noir it is!  A real showcase for Barbara.  Wonderful script and direction also.  So glad it was brought up here. 

Just proves that even with the great coverage provided by TCM there are still 'hidden' gems that are worth seeking out.

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An acquaintance is doing the same thing as you are.  He has a blog called Matt vs.The Academy in which he selects a year at random, watches and reviews each nominated Best Picture and has a poll for each year for anyone to vote for their pick as Best Picture.  I've been following along and have contributed my comments on most of his posts (under my real name).  I must say that I'm impressed by his writing and insights.

 

Although he has been doing this for several years, it is slow going (he's an actor and has produced some small theater plays, and is a new father to boot). Each year may take him a month or two to complete.  Still, he's covered about 35 Academy years so far.  And yes, some nominees are not available. He had to go to the UCLA archive to watch East Lynne and The White Banner. You may wish to check it out and join in. 

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Wow! I'm not nearly as ambitious as you. I am embarking on seeing all of the Best Picture winners. I've seen "Wings", "The Broadway Melody", "All Quiet on the Western Front" and "Cimarron" so far.

 

 

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I have seen all the best picture winners, with Gentleman's Agreement being the last one I saw (earlier this year on TCM as it happens).  As for best picture nominees, let's see

 

2010-2013 37 out of 37 (100%)

2000-2009 54 out of 55 (98%)

1990-1999 44 out of 50 (88%)

1980-1980 47 out of 50 (94%)

1970-1979 44 out of 50 (88%)

1960-1969 38 out of 50 (76%)

1950-1959 36 out of 50 (72%)

1940-1949 57 out of 70 (81%)

1927-1939 77 out of 100 (77%)

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Wow! I'm not nearly as ambitious as you. I am embarking on seeing all of the Best Picture winners. I've seen "Wings", "The Broadway Melody", "All Quiet on the Western Front" and "Cimarron" so far.

So are you doing them in chronological order?  I thought about that originally, but it was too hard.  I have to just grab them as I can find them.  Thus, a spread sheet.  Please keep in me update about your progress.  I have found that part of the fun in doing this is sharing it with others!

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I have seen all the best picture winners, with Gentleman's Agreement being the last one I saw (earlier this year on TCM as it happens).  As for best picture nominees, let's see

 

2010-2013 37 out of 37 (100%)

2000-2009 54 out of 55 (98%)

1990-1999 44 out of 50 (88%)

1980-1980 47 out of 50 (94%)

1970-1979 44 out of 50 (88%)

1960-1969 38 out of 50 (76%)

1950-1959 36 out of 50 (72%)

1940-1949 57 out of 70 (81%)

1927-1939 77 out of 100 (77%)

I think it is interesting that you are approaching by decades.  I have mine in a spread sheet year by year.

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Yeah, I'm doing it in chronological order.  Thank goodness for TCM and Netflix. One thing: the 1932 winner "Cavalcade". It's not on dvd, according to Netflix. I've got the list in a Word document, I'm highlighting the ones I've seen. I'm kind of torn about re-seeing the films I've already seen, like "It Happened One Night", "The Apartment", etc. But I imagine I will.  

So are you doing them in chronological order?  I thought about that originally, but it was too hard.  I have to just grab them as I can find them.  Thus, a spread sheet.  Please keep in me update about your progress.  I have found that part of the fun in doing this is sharing it with others!

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Yeah, I'm doing it in chronological order.  Thank goodness for TCM and Netflix. One thing: the 1932 winner "Cavalcade". It's not on dvd, according to Netflix. I've got the list in a Word document, I'm highlighting the ones I've seen. I'm kind of torn about re-seeing the films I've already seen, like "It Happened One Night", "The Apartment", etc. But I imagine I will.  

I thought about doing it chronologically but determined that it would take too long due to films such as Cavalcade being shown only ever so often.  So I skipped around.  This was especially beneficial when it came to attempting to watch all the nominees for Best Picture.  I decided that if I could remember it well enough to summarize to someone, I would count it as "watched."  Case in point: I know I have seen "The French Connection" and while I know the basic plot summary, I can't remember watching it.  So I would not give myself credit for watching it.  (It is one of four that I have left to watch.)  On the other hand, I have seen certain films such as The Apartment several times before I started "record keeping" so I counted it. 

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