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BasilBruce

Dr. Zhivago Haters Gather Here!

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The movie is overblown. Like somebody said no chemistry between Sharif and Christie but if you wanna take a cold dirty freezing train ride to adiyatin or whatever the hell it was called, this is the movie for you.

 

 

The best part of the film starts with the train ride to Yuriatin. I don't watch the first half of the film anymore, but I still love the second half.

 

pdvd_006.jpg

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I think that one reason Zhivago is not as well liked as other Lean pictures is that the movie seems to come off smug. It just seems to have an overblown feel to it, almost as if you should like it because it is a David Lean picture. But to me the only characters that were cared for were Tonya and Pasha (even though he was a commie). To bad they didn't end up together. I still think Pasha could have lived if he had ran away, he must have been in shape from all that lonely long distance running. ;)

 

As someone said there is nothing wrong with loving Zhivago, after all I watch That Hagen Girl for a guilty pleasure.

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I still think Pasha could have lived if he had ran away, he must have been in shape from all that lonely long distance running. ;)

 

 

 

:)

 

 
Tom Courtenay: another actor I like even though I hate DR ZHIVAGO.

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I think you should change the title of this thread to something like 'tell me why you love Dr. Zhivago'.    

 

Or Movies that are not our cup of tea.

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I'd love to see a sequel chronicling the Komerovsky/Lara years. :)

292mnp4.jpg

Now that's chemistry!..even if it is a bit one-sided.  :D

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She'd come to Moscow to look for her child. I helped her as best I could, but I knew it was hopeless. I think I was a little in love with her. One day she went away and didn't come back. She died or vanished somewhere, in one of the Labour Camps. A nameless number on a list that was afterwards mislaid. That was quite common in those days

 

 

General Yevgraf Zhivago

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I have to say I think this is a great movie, on IMDB it gets an 8.0 and is the 6th highest grossing film adjusted for inflation. So the "masses" like me like it as well.

 

It reminds me of Gone with the Wind in a way. Yes the characters are not perfect, but it shows what happens under that political climate to those that should be happy but can't be. Everybody is in the same misery except for the selected political few, and those few are under threat as well.

 

The characters end up as you would expect, broken and lost, and kids don't know who their true parents were.

 

When i see a movie like this it reminds me of how lucky we are to live in this Country, to be able to write on message boards and not be prosecuted. It is almost an endorsement for freedom.

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Something happened to David Lean in the late 50s. Before that he made really good movies. My theory is, he caught some kind of illness during the filming of Bridge on the River Kwai (a rare kind of malaria, brought on by a bite from a Sri Lankan mosquito ) that affected his brain. Henceforth he was seized with an obsession to make big long fat epic movies (it had something to do with rejecting his last name.)

 

I essentially agree with the above. I don't exactly hate Zhivago -- I like the music, the photography, and Steiger. But I don't really care for any of his epics. BOTRK is a shameful distortion of history (it was hated by the surviving prisoners who'd worked on the railroad). LOA is 3 hours+ but never explains the political issues involved (of particular interest now) and after seeing it we understand no more about T.E. Lawrence than we did before.

 

It's very curious that Lean started as an editor, as all his epics could use considerable pruning.

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I found the scenery, sets & photography breathtakingly beautiful. But I've always hated the movie-unlikeable charactors I cannot empathise with- I hate any story that glorifies adultery. But many people don't have the same issues I do and love the film-I think that's great. I may even give it another try based on MovieMadness's assessment.

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I think it's safe to say that the most agree that the music, backgrounds, and cinematography are brilliant. It just seems that the characters and plot ruin the movie. I agree that the characters running around are hard to like, but come to think of it most of Lean's characters are very flawed. Do you think people dislike Zhivago's characters more than Lean's others? If so why?

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I think it's safe to say that the most agree that the music, backgrounds, and cinematography are brilliant. It just seems that the characters and plot ruin the movie. I agree that the characters running around are hard to like, but come to think of it most of Lean's characters are very flawed. Do you think people dislike Zhivago's characters more than Lean's others? If so why?

I detest the score, so not safe to assume.

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Sorry, Basil, I gotta go with johnm001 on this one. I've said on these boards in the past, but since we're talking specifically about Dr. Zhivago again, I'll say it again:

 

It reaches a point in the film where I feel if I hear that "Somewhere My Love" theme one more time, with Julie Christie looking all saintly, suffering, yet with a faint sad smile playing about her lovely lips, I want to dump a big samovar of Russian tea over her head.

 

I wouldn't mind "Lara's Theme", or "Somewhere My Love", or whatever it's called, so much if they didn't keep playing it every time they want the audience's eyes to fill with tears. 

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 I agree that the characters running around are hard to like, but come to think of it most of Lean's characters are very flawed. Do you think people dislike Zhivago's characters more than Lean's others? If so why?

 

Well, Lean had done two films that dealt exclusively with adulterous love before Zhivago: Brief Encounter (1946) and the less-well-known, but nonetheless interesting The Passionate Friends (1949), which starred his onetime wife Ann Todd, Trevor Howard (again) and Claude Raines. I think the latter is his least-mentioned feature as a director, but it's good- when I first saw it on TCM  a year or so ago, I was like "I wonder who directed that?" and then I went to imdb and was all "ooooh." It has a very well done, artful finale that stays with you.

 

Maybe he was a tad blase' about the subject as he had handled it well twice- and both in time periods (1946 and 1949) where such a topic was really not viewed positively, in fact the production code was in effect*. So maybe- in wanting to stay relevant years later while making Zhivago- Lean was too casual, maybe too daring, too blase, in his telling of the story, not thinking that- well- there's another side to this story and one he had covered better before he had won two directing Oscars and had a couple of HUGE movies under his belt- ie when he still had something to prove.

 

Plus, Zhivago was made right in the middle of The 60's- which, again, I was not alive during, but it is my understanding that they were nuts and it shows in the films- I think there was an effort to have Zhivago reflect the (at the time) present-day. 

 

*- did England have a Production Code? Whatever you get my point.

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Completely off-topic: Lorna, every time I see that new Joan C. avatar of yours, I get all nervous. Joan looks pretty scary in that one.

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Completely off-topic: Lorna, every time I see that new Joan C. avatar of yours, I get all nervous. Joan looks pretty scary in that one.

 

It's meant to inspire fear.

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I detest the score

 

I also find the score annoying . . . although perhaps it's because I associate it with the movie.

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I still say if the score to Zhivago was done with an Accordion, it would be a whole different film.

 

"If Yuri had a squeezebox, Russia wouldn't sleep at night..."

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Plus, Zhivago was made right in the middle of The 60's- which, again, I was not alive during, but it is my understanding that they were nuts and it shows in the films- I think there was an effort to have Zhivago reflect the (at the time) present-day. 

 

Hmmmm...interesting premise here..."Kid"(wink, wink), however I've never noticed any of these "anachronisms" any time I've watched this film. As I believe MissW or maybe it was Swithin pointed out earlier, adultery is as old as the hills(or maybe the Ural Mountains might be more appropriate here) , and I still think the basic problem with this movie is that the two leads who commit the adultery are just sooooo damn BOR-ing!

 

(...and have little chemistry, as I said much earlier in this thread)

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It's meant to inspire fear.

 

You don't see the pistol she is holding. It is further down in the photo which has been cropped.

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I still say if the score to Zhivago was done with an Accordion, it would be a whole different film.

 

"If Yuri had a squeezebox, Russia wouldn't sleep at night..."

 

Good point.

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Okay, okay! Before somebody wacks me over the head with it. I know. I know. I always get the names of the two women confused. Geraldine Chaplin is Zhivago's loving and dutiful wife Tonya...and Julie Christie is the beautiful redheaded Lara. I always make that mistake with myself. So a sequel should chronicle the Komerovsky/Lara years.

Now if you could infuse Tonya's wonderful easy-to-get-along-with personality into Lara that would really be splendid luck for Komerovsky.  :lol:

292mnp4.jpg

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Hmmmm...interesting premise here..."Kid"(wink, wink), however I've never noticed any of these "anachronisms" any time I've watched this film. As I believe MissW or maybe it was Swithin pointed out earlier, adultery is as old as the hills(or maybe the Ural Mountains might be more appropriate here) , and I still think the basic problem with this movie is that the two leads who commit the adultery are just sooooo damn BOR-ing!

 

(...and have little chemistry, as I said much earlier in this thread)

Speaking of anachronisms, anyone else notice the hair? Then again beehives might have been all the rage during the revolution.

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Speaking of anachronisms, anyone else notice the hair? Then again beehives might have been all the rage during the revolution.

 

Well if beehives were the rage they should of used the B-52s as their background music  (Ok that group didn't exist at the time but you get the point).

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