Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Fanofmovies

A Clockwork Orange

Recommended Posts

I watched this movie for the first time today.  It is definitely a film that is to be watched and then discussed in a group setting.  I would love to hear others' takes on this film.  I can do some research but I like discovering symbolism and metaphorical meanings through discussing films with others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched this movie for the first time today.  It is definitely a film that is to be watched and then discussed in a group setting.  I would love to hear others' takes on this film.  I can do some research but I like discovering symbolism and metaphorical meanings through discussing films with others.

 

Looks like parts of the movie is coming true, referring to some young peoples lack of empathy and compassion toward their fellow man. Glad Alex at the end got a taste of his own medicine.

 

The drinking of milk plus to get intoxicated reminds me of "Alien Nation" where the newcomers gets drunk on sour milk.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that is not sufficiently commented on is that notwithstanding the charisma of Malcolm MacDowell's performance he is not nearly as smart as he thinks he is.  His response to mutiny in the ranks is to engage in a pre-emptive attack, with the result that they betray him the first chance they get (that very night as it happens).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit I've never been able to sit through the entire movie. In fact, the last time I was over to a friends house and he suggested we pop a Kubrick film into his Blu-Ray so we could watch it on his new 70 inch TV, and when he suggested THIS movie, I told him no thanks I'd rather watch "Dr.Strangelove" for the umpteenth time instead.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was another of my high school obsessions. Coming on the heels of Strangelove and 2001, it pretty much had me convinced Kubrick was some kind of all-time moviemaking genius (doubts began to form with Barry Lyndon).

 

My best friend and I spent much of our senior year calling each other "droogies" in horrible English accents. To  quote my favorite New Yorker cartoon, "Someday we'll look back on this time in our lives and think, 'Man, we were high'."

 

Fan of Movies, the novel is worth checking out.  As I recall, Anthony Burgess includes an essay on how he created the slang from bits of Russian and other sources.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 As I recall, Anthony Burgess includes an essay on how he created the slang from bits of Russian and other sources.

 

Burgess is amazing at language invention. He created all of the dialog for 'Quest for Fire' (1981) - in my opinion, one of the greatest movies ever made. And while not a smidge of it is in English (or any other known language) - and there are no subtitles - everything being communicated is understood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit I've never been able to sit through the entire movie. In fact, the last time I was over to a friends house and he suggested we pop a Kubrick film into his Blu-Ray so we could watch it on his new 70 inch TV, and when he suggested THIS movie, I told him no thanks I'd rather watch "Dr.Strangelove" for the umpteenth time instead.

Thanks for sharing this!  I really HAD to make myself watch this where as Dr. Strangelove is much for "palatable".  I am curious.  What is it that makes it so..."distasteful" to you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing that is not sufficiently commented on is that notwithstanding the charisma of Malcolm MacDowell's performance he is not nearly as smart as he thinks he is.  His response to mutiny in the ranks is to engage in a pre-emptive attack, with the result that they betray him the first chance they get (that very night as it happens).

Thanks for pointing that out to me.  I picked up on the "simplicity" of his mind but not actually how his lack of intelligence created his own circumstances.  Is there an underlying statement of "lack of intelligence fosters violent behavior"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was another of my high school obsessions. Coming on the heels of Strangelove and 2001, it pretty much had me convinced Kubrick was some kind of all-time moviemaking genius (doubts began to form with Barry Lyndon).

 

My best friend and I spent much of our senior year calling each other "droogies" in horrible English accents. To  quote my favorite New Yorker cartoon, "Someday we'll look back on this time in our lives and think, 'Man, we were high'."

 

Fan of Movies, the novel is worth checking out.  As I recall, Anthony Burgess includes an essay on how he created the slang from bits of Russian and other sources.

I may read the novel perhaps it would give an added level of appreciation.  I basically walked away with the idea that the movie is saying "violence is bad, but attempting to control people's behavior is worse".  Is that really all there is to it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Droogies!

 

I remember reading this novel for my college religion/science fiction course and then seeing the film. I had to write a paper on it, so since they weren't throwing patrons out after each showing, I sat through it four complete times. Uh, I went into the theater in daylight and when I came out it was almost midnight and I felt drugged...a bit like Alex.

 

I've not seen the movie for years, so excuse any detail mistakes...

 

Reading the book helped a lot with the Russian and other linguistic intrigues and I believe the title of a natural thing like an orange with a mechanical thing, like a clock shows that the Ludovician treatment is the combination of two incompatible entities.

 

Two other things that make the movie superb are the music and the fashion and décor. I believe that there is also the interesting connection to superstar musician Walter Carlos and his contribution, but when you look him up you might have to now spell his/her name as Wendy Carlos. There are very few photos of him online, which is a whole other fascinating story but I digress.

 

This is one of the few if not only, sci-fi movies which does not have everyone in the future wearing similar boring clothing. This film actually went to the trouble of showing different strata of taste, style and class through the décor and fashions, as you remember the Cat Lady was high end avant garde stuff and the parents of Alex had lowbrow clothing and furnishings, in my opinion.

 

The combining of one who had great taste in music with a bloodthirst in violence, was genius by its author, as it made the belief that Alex was worth saving from his own vices a plausible concept. 

 

A definite five-star flick, no question. I could still watch it over and over as I love the "Thieving Magpie" music [which again influences the rape scene]  and the incredible photography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Droogies!

 

I remember reading this novel for my college religion/science fiction course and then seeing the film. I had to write a paper on it, so since they weren't throwing patrons out after each showing, I sat through it four complete times. Uh, I went into the theater in daylight and when I came out it was almost midnight and I felt drugged...a bit like Alex.

 

I've not seen the movie for years, so excuse any detail mistakes...

 

Reading the book helped a lot with the Russian and other linguistic intrigues and I believe the title of a natural thing like an orange with a mechanical thing, like a clock shows that the Ludovician treatment is the combination of two incompatible entities.

 

Two other things that make the movie superb are the music and the fashion and décor. I believe that there is also the interesting connection to superstar musician Walter Carlos and his contribution, but when you look him up you might have to now spell his/her name as Wendy Carlos. There are very few photos of him online, which is a whole other fascinating story but I digress.

 

This is one of the few if not only, sci-fi movies which does not have everyone in the future wearing similar boring clothing. This film actually went to the trouble of showing different strata of taste, style and class through the décor and fashions, as you remember the Cat Lady was high end avant garde stuff and the parents of Alex had lowbrow clothing and furnishings, in my opinion.

 

The combining of one who had great taste in music with a bloodthirst in violence, was genius by its author, as it made the belief that Alex was worth saving from his own vices a plausible concept. 

 

A definite five-star flick, no question. I could still watch it over and over as I love the "Thieving Magpie" music [which again influences the rape scene]  and the incredible photography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to watch this film any more than Dargo does. This is the first film I ever walked out of. Whatever Kubrick thinks he is doing, he is showing that rape, violence, and sadism are "cool" if the "cool" do them. If you identify with the victims, this is not an enjoyable film.

 

Burgess' novel was inspired by the fact that some Nazis enjoyed Beethoven and other classical composers, so that it was possible to enjoy and appreciate great music and yet commit horrific crimes. Through the medium of his prose, he could create the distance needed to explore this conundrum.

 

On the other hand, film is a much more visceral medium, and Kubrick's directorial choices remove that  distancing which was available in the novel.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing this!  I really HAD to make myself watch this where as Dr. Strangelove is much for "palatable".  I am curious.  What is it that makes it so..."distasteful" to you?

 

Well, right off the bat when McDowell and his cohorts beat up the drunk on the street and then a little later when they invade that home and he rapes the wife while singing "Singin' in the Rain". THAT'S just about the time I say to myself somethin' like, "Okay, I THINK I get Kubrick's idea here about the dichotomy of modern life, with there being the unreal fantasy depicted in films like the Gene Kelly movie and contrasting that with the gritty real violence to be found in the modern world", but by THIS time I've pretty much have had enough of how Kubrick is setting up what I know through reading of the story's premise about it questioning which is worse, extreme antisocial behavior or the measures to eradicate it.

 

(...I guess one might say I "just couldn't take the visuals used to press the point of the story" for very long...I don't know, maybe that's a failing on my part)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, right off the bat when McDowell and his cohorts beat up the drunk on the street and then a little later when they invade that home and he rapes the wife while singing "Singin' in the Rain". THAT'S just about the time I say to myself somethin' like, "Okay, I THINK I get Kubrick's idea here about the dichotomy of modern life, with there being the unreal fantasy depicted in films like the Gene Kelly movie and contrasting that with the gritty real violence to be found in the modern world", but by THIS time I've pretty much have had enough of how Kubrick is setting up what I know through reading of the story's premise about it questioning which is worse, extreme antisocial behavior or the measures to eradicate it.

 

(...I guess one might say I "just couldn't take the visuals used to press the point of the story" for very long...I don't know, maybe that's a failing on my part)

_________________________________________________________________________

 

I don't think it's a failing on your part, I agree. Saw Clockwork Orange in a theater when it first was released, too upsetting then and still is. I'll always pass on this one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so glad to hear someone else struggling with this movie.  I suppose I automatically assume that since it was a "Best Picture" nominee there is some type of intrinsic benefit, but this was difficult for me.  I am able to see the artistic brilliance with the utilization of the music in contradiction to the violence as well as other unique aspects to the movie but overall I found it difficult to stomach.  When I considered this, I related it to how I responded to "12 Years a Slave", which was also difficult for me to watch; however, whereas "Slave" was a strictly dramatic interpretation with no pretense about the purpose of the violence, "Clockwork"'s utilization of violence to make a point about society is so obscure that I think it gets lost. I ended up wondering exactly what the point was.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to watch this film any more than Dargo does. This is the first film I ever walked out of. Whatever Kubrick thinks he is doing, he is showing that rape, violence, and **** are "cool" if the "cool" do them. If you identify with the victims, this is not an enjoyable film.

 

Burgess' novel was inspired by the fact that some Nazis enjoyed Beethoven and other classical composers, so that it was possible to enjoy and appreciate great music and yet commit horrific crimes. Through the medium of his prose, he could create the distance needed to explore this conundrum.

 

On the other hand, film is a much more visceral medium, and Kubrick's directorial choices remove that  distancing which was available in the novel.

Thanks for sharing this.  Although the connection between the sadism of the Nazi regime and the beauty of Beethoven is obvious when you point it out, I missed the connection in the film. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...